Allan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G.

Allan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G.

b: 20 MAR 1846
d: 14 JUN 1901
Barton Fields
Canterbury
England
From 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families' December 1902 pages 82 to 84:

>> 5. Allan Maclean Skinner, C.M.G., the younger son of Allan Maclean Skinner, Q.C., was born at Brighton on the 20th March, 1846, and died at Canterbury on the 14th June, 1901.
He was educated at Bruce Castle School, where he distinguished himself. In June, 1867, he was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn, and shortly afterwards entered the Civil Service of the Straits Settlements, then recently created, passing first in the examinations. This was the commencement of thirty years of continuous and honourable service in the Malay Peninsula.
Onthe 23rd September, 1875, he married at St. Saviour's, Clapham, Miss Ellen Shelford, daughter of the Rev. William Heard Shelford, rector of Preston St. Mary, Suffolk, and sister of Mr. Thomas Shelford, C.M.G., of Singapore. Their children are:

John Harding Skinner born 16th Sept., 1876
Caroline Emily Skinner born 18th Sept., 1877
Clifton Maclean Skinner born 19th Feb., 1879
Alan Leonard Dorney Skinner born 2nd Nov., 1880
Ellen Florance Skinner born 13th July 1884
William Shelford Skinner born 19th Dec., 1886
Mildred Skinner born 10th Sept., 1890


In 188I Mr. Allan Maclean Skinner was appointed Auditor-General, with a seat on the Legislative Council. He acted as Colonial Secretary of the Straits Settlements from 1884 to 1889, and as Deputy Governor in 1885. In 1887 he was appointed Resident Councillor of Penang, which appointment he continued to hold until his retirement in 1897, combining with it from 1888 onwards the office of Her Majesty's Consul for the Siamese States.
He took an active part in the bombardment of Selangor in 187I, the Perah negotiations in 1874, the Muir election in 1877, and in the proceedings generally which established the British Protectorate of the Malay Peninsula.
He was the first Inspector of Schools in the Colony and the originator of its educational system.
In 189I he was decorated with the Companionship of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in recognition of his public services.
During his residence in the East he contributed to local journals, and when his retirement from the service of his country brought with it time and leisure - though unfortunately accompanied by failing health - he devoted himself still more to literary pursuit. He wrote a history of Eastern Geography, which was published by Stanford and Co., and at the time of his death he was engaged on a history of the Straits Settlements. He also wrote much poetry. The following of his verses are quoted here as having a special and appropriate interest. They were written about his mother, Mrs. Caroline Emily Skinner, in January and February, 1901, immediately after her death, and only about four months before he himself passed away.


From 'Straits Settlements Civil Service List 1893', sent to me by Winson Saw:

"Skinner, Allan Maclean, C.M.G. Resident Councillor of Penang. First appointed in Public Service and first appointment in the colony - 24 November 1868; appointment as Councillor - 12 September 1887; annual salary - $9600;
SERVICE IN THE COLONY: Admitted to a cadetship S. S., 24 Nov 1868; passed final examination in Malay - 18 Nov 1870; Acting Magistrate P. W., April 1871 to 1873; Inspector of schools and prisons, 1873; Inspector of hospitals in addition, May 1873; thrice Acting Assistant Colonial Secretary between 1874 and 1879; confirmed as Assistant Colonial Secretary and Clerk of Councils July 1879; Auditor-General S.S., May 1881; Colonial Treasurer, Collector of Stamps and Accountant-General of the Supreme Court, S. S., 1 May 1882; Acting Colonial Secretary from March 1884 to October 1885; appointed Resident Councillor of P., 12 September 1887; but before taking up the appointment was again Acting Colonial Secretary from Nov 1887 to Nov 1889. Absent on leave from 8 July 1875 to 29 February 1876, from 13 July 1880 to 13 May 1881, from 1 January 1886 to 2 March 1887, and from November 1889 to 9 March 1890 and from 24 October 1891 to 1 November 1892. Is a Justice of the Peace, P.
GENERAL REMARKS: Admitted to the Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn, December 1863. Called to the Bar in Trinity Term 1867. Appointed Civil Comissioner to accompany the Rinaldo Expedition against Selangor in July 1871. Attended Governor Sir A. Clarke in the Pangkor Negotiations (January 1874); deputed to attend the Muar election, November 1877; appointed British Consul for the Siamese States of the West Coast of the Malay Peninsula, April 1888.

"Her Fifty Years"

Her fifty years, fast-bound in such a bond,
Must shame our murmurs; her delight in earth.
Her radiant vision of the Life beyond.
Brace other spirits. That abounding mirth
But for a moment rests upon the shelf:
--Her tired life has overslept itself.

"One Journey more"

One journey more for her, who many a year
In all its length had travelled through the land,
And held its green and living changes dear;-
To-day her children watch Life's failing sand.
And closing lids. For them, like her, before
Our eyes can meet again, one journey more.

"When all is still."

When all is still - the only comfort now
Speak softly as we used to, lest she hear
The.broken whispers in the room below
There lies the silent face we held so dear
--Age in its beauty; with its reverend brow.
Though coffined, yet a spirit brave and clear

" She ruled us well"

She ruled us well: the only lawful throne
Is loving strength, which cannot lose control.
As star to planet, may not soul to soul
Strike through some finer ether of its own?
Since loyal hearts are lords of human fate,
And neither dare usurp nor abdicate!

"The view she loved"*

The view she loved so well and made her own
Through many a sunset, many a sunny morn,
A deeper mystery will now adorn: -
Below, the shadows of the cliff are thrown,
The broad bay lies to westward; and afar
The great white wastes of water on the Bar.

"Dust to dust, ashes to ashes"

Now Life has paid its penalty:
And Faith reclaimed her fealty:
- O Grave, where is thy victory?
O Death, what hast thou won?

The selfishness that sways a man,
The anguish that dismays a man,
The passion that betrays a man,
Are over now and done;

The work completed valiantly,
The fight concluded gallantly.
The hope upheld triumphantly
For evermore go on!

He died at Canterbury, where he had lived since his retirement, and was on the 17th June, 1901, buried in the churchyard at St. Martin's.

*This was the view from Stone House, Abbotsham; the window of Mrs. C. E. Skinner's room commanded an uninterrupted view of Bideford Bay from Hartland Point to Baggy. <<

END

From the Calendar of wills at FRC:

SKINNER, Allan Maclean of Barton Fields Canterbury died 23 February 1901. Probate London 6 July to the reverend John Harding Skinner clerk. Effects £2,494 9s 6d.


From Winson Saw, Penang, Malaysia, April 2004:

"The reason why I'm interested in Allan Maclean Skinner is personal interest in pictures of Governors of Penang and Malacca during British era. As promised, I attach photos of Allan Maclean Skinner & Residency (place that Allan stayed when he was term of Resident Councillor (Governor) of Penang from (1887-1897).

Residency (now named as Seri Mutiara) built more than 100 years ago in Penang. Mr. A.M. Skinner was first Resident Councillor to stayed in this beautiful classical building. In 1890, just few month after it became local political place. Resident Councillor was also elect as President of Municipal Council of Georgetown shortly after their arrived in Penang. By that time many wealthy European forced for local political cases to return to them. Resident Councillor also as President of Municipal Council of Georgetown but European in there forced The Governors of Straits Settlements to elect one of them became President of Municipal Council of Georgetown. By reason saying that The Resident Councillor more act as Asst. to the Governor and didn't care about them mean European people. Sir Cecil Clementi Smith, Governor of Straits Settlements at that time understand the situation. Therefore he elected Mr.J.Y.Kennedy, owner of Pinang Gazette the local newspaper became President of Municipal Council of Georgetown in late year 1891 when Mr.Skinner on leave in Europe. Mr.Allan Maclean Skinner was last Resident Councillor elected as President of Municipal Council of Georgetown."

From Winson Saw, July 2004:

"Dear Alan,

Allan Maclean Skinner used to serve as Inspector General of Schools, Hospitals and Prisons under Anson. 1881- Colonial treasurer and Auditor-General. Skinner was the first Resident Councillor who took reside at the official residence called Residency (now Seri Mutiara) n 1890. He was the President of George Town Municipal Council.
Cheers,
Winson Saw"

From Winson Saw, December 2005:

Winson Saw, my email correspondent, sent me the file called 'Supreme Court of The Straits Settlements, 1868', scanned from 'Malaya Law Review Vol.2 No.1 July 1969' by J.W.Norton Kyshe. It gives the membership of the Supreme Court in 1868. Winson also sent scans of the 1937 Silver Jubilee Celebrations in Old Penang. He wrote: "The Penang Residency is where Alan Maclean Skinner lived at the time he became Resident Councillor (Governor) of Penang. I have included that picture too. Just bought these old books from a flea market friend". For more recent photos of Old Penang see http://www.webshots.com/search?new=1&source=mdocsheader&words=Old+Penang

JAC Pearce said, in 2004:

"A M Skinner helped Swettenham to found the Malay Settlements, ie to bring them under British control. His daughter married Boggis and they had a son who was a distinguished airman - he bombed Berlin."
[Letter from Allan Skinner to his sister Euphemia, wife of Holroyd Chaplin]


Grand Hotel, Venice
9th May 1875 (Monday)

My dear Effie

It seems almost incredible that I should really be sitting on the Grand Canal at Venice "where the merchants were the Kings, where St Mark’ is, where the Doges used to wed the sea with rings”

I have enjoyed the last 24 hours in the same sort of way that one enjoys a pleasant dream -- only I hope to have a better recollection of all I have seen. Fancy coming from Singapore to Venice at one leap; the emporium of today is an excellent counterfoil to that of Marco Polo. A modern Marco finds all his amazement comes on returning from the East not on getting out there. I have been revelling in the stony beauties and the painted wonders of the place and am just off for my last visit to the Palace and the Prison "on each hand". But for an account of them I must wait till next Saturday.

My immediate object is to tell you of an improvement in my plans, by which I shall see the Dolomites but shall in all probability be delayed till Saturday evening at 6 p.m.. Mr Malcolm the P&O agent here has very civilly offered to be Cicerone and I have agreed to go with him through the mountains.

Please tell John of my movements, in case he is at Dover Brussels or Paris and happens to be coming over on Saturday. It strikes me as a very likely that Florry will be about returning from Cannes, but I received no letter here to say whether I could be of any use in escorting her.

Your loving brother
A Chaplin

[Undated letter probably from Allan Maclean Skinner to his mother Caroline Emily Harding. It was probably sent in the autumn of 1865, when he would have been 19 (see his bet, below)]

Across the top is written: Sept 6th. Dearest Papa, I forward to you this letter of Ally’s that came yesterday. The Chestnut is quite well again. Mama is very poorly. Please return this to Mama. Love to ? How is your ankle? Your affectionate child, Effie.

Ashley House, Monday

Dearest Mamma,
I report myself returned and have kept as near time as the steamers would permit. I left Wiesbaden on Thursday and came to Antwerp almost direct to catch the Sunday boat, the only one for nearly a week. I stayed exactly a week at Wiesbaden and found plenty to see and do there. The German watering places are very gay and have a great advantage over ours in the play-table institution; for they (the gaming company) find their revenues so much increased by having a large number of visitors that they are willing to spend thousands in making the place attractive. In Wiesbaden they have laid out a park with a jet 120 feet in height, built a regular palace for gambling rooms and reading rooms, and give concerts and a magnificent ball (réunion dansante) weekly. The "spielfische" were very interesting to watch, especially as a face-study. Some of the players, especially the women showed an interest in their money but in general the coins are viewed merely as counters are at a muffin-worry. A few Frenchman derive a regular income from play, but to do this they must have acquired a great command over their impulses and must never let their temper? defy chance as do most new hands at the siren sport. The Prince and Princess of Wales were at Wiesbaden just before I came, and Prince lost three pounds in a few seconds but then retired. Everyone who watches much is expected sometimes to lay down a coin, so I put a florin on my years, number 19; but fate and the Croupier were inexorable and my contribution was raked in to the support of the vicious institution. The Croupiers are considered gentleman by profession and the regular gamblers even are not cut, but a salutary law prevents a Nassasurian from playing.

The ball was great fun; a magnificent marble hall and polished oak floor to dance on, 2 military bands to dance to, and cosmopolitan beauty to dance with. All nationalities and all styles of face and dress were and there must have been from 400 to 600 people. Not many however danced, on account of an etiquette forbidding any formal introduction. Such an opportunity for young girls of from 13 to 16 many of whom are taken there and enjoy it so much. The Germans dance very well, especially the gentlemen. Wiesbaden has lovely walks about it and on Monday last (28th) Alice gave a birthday picnic. Her guests were nearly all Germans, old girl friends of her childhood and Nassaurian officers, modern friends of her grown-up world. The whole thing was very German, the party first strolled up into the forest, ate ices, effervesced with hilarity; played a German kiss in the ring (without the kissing or any sort of Cockney romping) and then went back to a “wirschschaft”, an aristocratic tea garden.

On the way back one of the Germans, the funny-dog of the party, told a tale from Shakespeare, in honour of the English hostess, and then they all sang together, and very prettily too. Alice gave a very good supper, plenty of wine, fruit etc, nearly all the guests presented her with a bouquet separately and the officers collectively with an enormous one; their leader went through the German ceremony of hand kissing, and the biggest wig present made a speech in her honour to which I had to return thanks. After supper we danced several hours in the room hired for the purpose. It was a great success; and the most pleasing and German part of it all was that £2.10 covered all the expenses.

I chaperoned Alice out riding one day and though riding a horse fond of a run-away, she acquitted herself very well. The Rufus association is hardly fair now. I managed to go and "do" Frankfurt; it is indeed "a some interesting place" as my fair Bostonians observed, from whom I parted here for the different paths our fates assign at last. There is a famous Jew-street here -- a monument to Christian intolerance -- where a 4000 Jews were cooped up and never allowed to issue for several hundred years. In spite of all this tyranny they could not prevent the Groby family (Rothschild) is from rising high enough to heap coals of fire upon their heads by coming to be the city’s greatest benefactors. Goethe’s house too is much honoured and is likely to have a much better passage through the centuries than the little Warwick cottage. I left Wiesbaden on Thursday with Alice and Miss Vautier, the lady lodging-keeper. The two latter came with me in order to see the Rhine, but I left them at Coblenz and went straight on through Cologne to Antwerp. I have had a pleasant and smooth passage today but we fore-passengers had a great nuisance in the shape of live cattle -- a plague speculation -- with whom we were mixed "promiscuous-like". The money part of the two are has been very satisfactory, the hotels cheap, and the worst swindling four shillings for bed and breakfast. I have been able to travel second-class in Germany (because of the dirty smoking habits), third in Belgium, best cabin of the Rhine-boats (the whole thing insignificantly cheap), and put up at good second-class hotels for under £9, including some purchases of reminiscences etc.. Of the other £1: 13 shillings the journey to London etc. and seven shillings in a handsome birthday present I made to Alice as a kind of return for her generosity to me. She paid all the week’s expenses at Wiesbaden and gave me a concert ticket to hear German students sing choruses, and was very kind and pleasant throughout.

I am however now money-less and indeed could not breakfast on board this morning on account of the large charge and my narrow purse. Send me something to go on with. Ask Effie to tell me all plans and where are Florry and Walter and if there has been anything more on the Civil Service subject and what you think now about a "tutor" and whether I shall find one out myself. I will write a few business lines to Effie -- so with best love and many thanks for the very pleasant tour which I feel to have “widened the alleys of my mind”.

I remain your loving son, Allan.

[I think the undated letter below, in a lively style, is from Allan Jnr, who certainly had to do with Singapore, but I don’t know whether he was writing from there. All his other letters to her start ‘Dear Effie’ but this ends “Yr loving Br, Allan”. I assume it was the exam which did or didn’t lead to his selection for the Civil Service of the Straits Settlements – he mentions a failure in the other letter from this address.]

24 Old Square
W’nesday

Dearest Pip,

I must write and tell you that it is over, but I can’t tell you more yet. I shall not know for a week or more but I can’t help thinking that I have done for this knotty head. He turns out an aristocrat and an Honourable Elliott (son of Lord Heathfield) – so naturally think of that popular rhyme (sung by Mr Parrel and quoted by Maud) of:

“One day I met an aristocrat, ristocrat, ristocrat
I rode up against him and knocked him flat”

Amen! But it turns out he has lived in Germany and of course has a great pull there, particularly as they made us speak all the modern languages by way I suppose of testing that material aptitude they frightened all of us about. They asked me whether I wished to speak Italian and German – fancy wishing to be shot at alive á la Deerslayer? with the delicious excitement of wondering how far such shot would sticke. But I took it out of the Frenchman by way of compensation; and as more experienced together in that subject, I was able to see for certain that I knew more of that language than he did. You will be able to find out specifically how I did in each, whether I pass and am “far, far away” or failed and am all too near, the Commiss’rs publish the report of all exam’s. and as there were only two in ours you can tell which is for me. It appears there was a third at first who soon dropped out of the running. I am very worn and neuralgic; with a sleepless night last night, relieved that it is over. I hope I shall feel better tomorrow. If not I must wait for the climate of Singapore to mend me as so to speak it has marred me.

Love and thanks for your letter. Allan


[I haven’t been able to date this letter. “Edith married on the 17th” – Edith Pyne was married on 2nd January 1868 which seems a reasonable year – perhaps the date changed but more likely Edith was a Carr – a friend. From the tone of the letter he was still young and working in London presumably as a barrister, which narrows it to between 1864 and 1870. Johnny was working in the City in 1864 and Holroyd was in London. I have decided to quess at 1868, but it is just a guess]

24 Old Square,
Friday

Dear Effie

I agree that our parting was as vague and as "unprepared for as Death”. I meant to have gone with Holroyd but W.C. came and restricted me to that pretty piece of the landscape above Angmering(?) Church; then I turned back and bad farewell to Sussex -- and indeed to Summer.

We are going to have a sharp time of it I doubt this winter. At any rate it comes on us early. How is Hayling for skating? Johnny comes back loud with its praises. He says Mama has at last earned the reward of all her travellings. It is like Ulysses and his "Happy Isles". Could they ever have been Hayling and others since devoured by the oysters? Johnny duly arrived yesterday afternoon and Holroyd asked me to meet him (?) at Old 35. Johnny told us of you and your last appearance and the funny little railway and the fun about Havant etc. -- and some of us were very much interested.

We were to have gone out (à la ‘Jolly Days’) to see the re-decorated Marylebone Theatre, but Louey used her privilege of Veto at the eleventh hour (11pm). Friday the civilities were returned at No 24, with a hot lunch at 1.30 p.m. (?) and I have just returned from the city where I said goodbye to J. Tomorrow morning he starts, after breakfast with (?). You should pay me another visit now. My walls, my furniture and my bookshelf have all the "passed underneath the yoke of change".

One picture (of the single available Skinner distingué) is Papa’s present and looks very well. The other is Clif’s. But alas for the days of Brocton and Thompson's cottage! Economy has foisted upon me a hated gilt frame which has scuffed out Cliffy’s delicate pastel covering. I sigh for the solid gold oak frames that are bound up with memories of you and the bygone! The frames that cost (?) and next to nothing. Here they are 5/6. I have put in a claim, on strict Positivist grounds, to the old picture of Uncle James. He is especially my uncle on that side by some mysterious rule of inheritance and descent. He will hang over my closet door in place of the horseshoe for it has been well suggested that to keep away the D. (W Deb) might be almost unprofessional if carried out strictly, and long keep my door closed to the leading client.

My furniture has been disarranged by a new round table to supply the one Shirley at last claimed. It comes from Aunty’s bedroom where Mr Mac said it was only in the way. I wish you were likely to come and see it all again. You will still recognise the wall and the bookshelf for which you are the responsible artist. It was closely threatened on the arrival of the table but sentiment prevailed -- Amen!

I'm off to dine with the Carrs by invite and régle, so I supposed it to be specially grand; for I have one of those delightful invitations there that "stands over". Edith is married on the 17th -- the anniversary of my last autumn’s failure - so much for this part(?) of my life. Now for Chapter II or Volume II where the race is for the swift and the battle to the strong. Give the enclosed to Mamma.

You're loving brother
Allan

Singapore, January 29th, 1874

My dear Effie

From Aunty’s letter describing the receipt and distribution of the shawls etc. which Mr Grace took home for me, it seems that I was not very clear as to who was to get them. The intention was to give the shawls to the good mothers and the small articles, hoods or whatever they are called, to the (?)ixties -- Seniores priores in selection.

Cleve wrote me such a letter by last mail -- all about Turks and infidels Cubans and blockade-runners it quite took my breath away. I felt ten years older when I had done my affectionate nephew’s despatch. I am waiting for a leisure hour to reply in proper style. I shall begin to expect disquisitions in Greek (and Stewart Mill) from my godson, next half.

We have had great doings in these parts, crowning Sultans and annexing kingdoms, of which I have written to Devonshire in more detail. The joke is that everybody is congratulating me on being appointed first Resident -- as I reply "everyone but the right person has told me so." Unfortunately I am sufficiently behind the scenes to know it's not really so, though I hope it may be some day. In the meantime it is very gratifying to see our colony developing (and its appointments pari passu of course) with every promise of beating Ceylon some day, who is at present the spoiled child of the family

Your ever affectionate brother
Allan

PS I do not want the Law report for next year. I believe there is a small balance of my money left. I should like the Pall Mall budget continued; and will you ask Holroyd to pay the Civil Service Store £2 or so I shall owe them for an order I am sending next French Mail above and beyond the £10 P. O. order accompanying it. A. M. C.


Singapore, January 25th [1875]

My dearest Effie,

Of course it is far too late to tell you of my engagement as a piece of news for I am sure you will have heard it already. It is one of affection of course and on this and every other ground I feel more satisfied every day with what I have done. I began to think I was getting too old and hardened a sinner ever to feel "in love" again. It seemed clear that a "furlough" attachment could only lead to a “marriage in haste,” which I dislike as much as you, I know, always did; and judging from our marriages the whole Skinner family seems to agree with us.

And yet it seemed that no alternative was offered me. I must meet (?), wed and all in 12 months, or prepare to go unwedded. However my usual good fortune has not deserted me; as you will agree when you know my dear Nelly.

Really we have seen as much of each other, with better means of judging, during the last nine months than one could during as many years in London. It is a small society and a small place; morning walks, (?)-days, croquets are all so many opportunities of meeting; of which I soon began to take every advantage.

The congratulations and knowing looks etc. etc. are almost over now; and it is very pleasant. I am glad it is known. I am not good at secrets. So I ride old Tully over every morning while still almost dark and then a short walk with my dear girl, and then on Tully once more and a spin home before it is too hot. This and an occasional (?) kettledrum is all the time for (?) an overworked government can spare its Assistant Secretary.

We had a good long drive back from (?)hore on Saturday with my little ponies -- but she generally drives me, having a grand equipage of her own. The fact is she is a great "swell" out here, for one in native parlance described as "Missee." The climate is not favourable to the species heiress whom we never see by any chance.

She carries it off with a charming absence of the ton manière which some ladies with grand carriages generally assume. I am sure I shall like her better if possible when she resumes the part of (?)’s bride at Clapham Common. Of all I have ever known as well I should choose her for my wife, even if I were not in love with her.

I have given you a regular nuptial ode have I not? But I know you will be interested. She will probably go home at the end of March -- a month or more before I do.
Your loving brother, Allan.



[Letter from Allan Maclean Skinner CMG’s wife Nelly (Ellen)]

Clarendon Hotel, Singapore. April 19

My dear Carrie

Many thanks for your note and the photo of yourself which came by the last mail - it shall go into the red Russian leather album we bought in London, amongst the other members of the two families, and I hope will long keep its pretty English complexion.

I was so sorry to hear that poor Mr Skinner had been suffering so much. I am afraid the latter end of the winter was more trying to many people. My mother says that she has hardly left the house at all.

I wrote an account of our doings to Auntie last week, and I hope to write to Louey very soon. She was so good in writing to enquire for Allan when he was ill several times, and I must write and thank her. Will you give her my love? Meanwhile -- has Allan told you of the formation of a society for the prevention of cruelty to animals here? The start has been a good one. At the first meeting about three weeks ago, there were 24 people of the pick of Singapore who have subscribed liberally towards the expenses. Mr Hervey is the business secretary and of course Allan is a member. It is quite necessary that a check should be put upon natives who are most brutal towards dumb creatures. We have seen two instances of the cruelty practised on them within the last two days.

We took a trip on Easter Eve to the seaside. There is a place called (?) Panjong about four miles off where people go for change of air and sea-bathing. Two friends (?) and we had a nice little tea party down there in a picnic style. The tide alas was too low for bathing and we drove home when it was cool.

I must not take up more room in Allan’s letter so will only add kind love to all.

Yours very affectionately
Nelly

[No year given]

Singapore, 20.4

My dearest Mother

I am so sorry to hear that the cold winter has proved so trying; surely the summer has come now. I feel sympathy with that philosopher in Leech’s picture who buried the drunkard and wished he had "half his complaint". I wish we had half yours. The weather is unusually hot and dry for Singapore. I almost wish I were to be sent to "the seat of war" for some of those places are high and cool.

The Government has behaved well to me now in firing this double duty (i.e. double pay) but it has called forth the indignation of one journal and the injudicious sympathy of another, which speaks of me as "a vilifended official"! Meanwhile the additional salary is very serviceable in the present state of the money market. Money market most literally, for the silver in which we are paid is gradually going down in value -- just as if it were tea or sugar. All our things have arrived safely. I am out at 7 a.m. and never get home till 5 p.m.. But I am all the better for it so far, and Nellie keeps well too.

Love and thanks to Carrie for her letter and photo. It was the only one last mail and indeed the only one for the last three mails! But I don't want you to trouble about writing. I can think about you so easily -- and I do so often -- without it.

Ever your loving son
Allan




[From Effie’s age below - 1877]

Govt Hill, Singapore. 10th June

My dear Effie

At last we have got into our new house and find ourselves very comfortable after the hot sea side. Everything is so contrarywise in the tropics - that the sea is the hottest place to build. Now we are in what is generally considered the best bungalow of its size in Singapore. Of course it is not so cool as (?), but then it is only one mile instead of 4 from town. Above us frowns the very grand but rather gloomy Govt house, and we have the benefits of its pretty gardens. Your poor friend Birch was the last tenant after whom the married ADC (Captain Paton) was quartered there. [see footnote below, ARJ.]

It is almost too late to say "happy returns", though we did not forget to think of you and drink to you on the seventh with fond recollections of last year. We were dining out with my old house-chum George Anson on that day; but on the following day we had a small party chiefly composed of “the service”, and all my new things were shown off, much approved of. That is Nelly's department -- so I leave it to her. I know she intends to write to you.

I am leaving her a grass widow today, having to go on a visit of inspection to Penang. I leave at 4pm today and must be brief. I hope Holroyd got my letter and remittances. I received in turn a large (?) by last mail and also the first of the Pall Malls. Many thanks; and again or rather at last, the best wishes for your 30th year (you seem to wish to be made out as old as possible -- I feel all too young). I hope dear you will write me long letters in the old-style sometimes and tell me all about Nugent the "latest."

Kind regards to Holroyd
your affectionate brother
Allan Skinner

ARJ footnote: I was contacted by email by Duncan Sutherland on 24 July 2009, a freelance historian living in Singapore. He wrote that he had “just finished a chapter of a book about a house called Sri Temasek. Between 1869 and 1959 this was the home of the colonial secretary, a post which your ancestor Allan Skinner temporarily held on a few occasions in the 1880s.” I sent him the possibly relevant part of the first paragraph above and he replied as below, with a photo.

“Today I checked the Straits Settlement Blue Books and found some information that may help date the letter. Capt. Paton was ADC from 1875 until 1876 or 1877. Allan Skinner was inspector of schools, prisons, hospitals and the police until 1879, when he became assistant colonial secretary. He might have moved into a new house in 1877 without getting a promotion, or may have written in 1879 when he became assistant colonial secretary. There was an assistant colonial secretary's house where the first president of Singapore lived and which has since been torn down. It would make sense if he moved into a new residence with his new job, but odd that Birch and Paton would have lived there.

I have a sneaking fear that, much as I would like to add this to my chapter, he was writing about another house. This photo [scan0003.jpg in this folder] shows one of the demolished bungalows (not the assistant colonial secretary's but another one), on which one could say that Government House was frowning down. Sri Temasek is further away, though, so his description would not be so apt.”

I asked Duncan about Birch. He replied:

“You are probably right about 'there' referring to Government House; I can see the ADC being quartered at Government House as there were many rooms and the governor's private secretary did have accommodation there. But Birch was Colonial Secretary, no.2 in the government, from 1870 to 1874 and should have lived in the colonial secretary's bungalow. He should not have lived in Government House, except temporarily during the governor's absence. He would not have been the last tenant of Government House by 1877, still less 1879, as there would have been other acting governors since then. The governors were often away.

He was 'poor' Birch as he was murdered in Perak in 1875. The British sent an expedition to track down his killers and exiled the sultan who gave the order. Birch was not popular with the Malays - and even among the British, I read a hilariously derisive editorial about him in one of the newspapers. His death is a touchy subject in Malaysia, with I think most Malays today seeing his death as a blow against imperialism. I don't know where he would have met Allan Skinner's sister.

Even if 'there' does mean Government House, this letter seems likely to have been 1877 or 1879 (either after Paton left or when Skinner was promoted) so it was probably not the colonial secretary's house into which he moved. I presume you don't have letters from the 1880s which describe his home.”

This has been an interesting correspondence. If there's anything else you're wondering please ask. My chapter passingly mentions Skinner as one of the interesting people who lived in the house during its early years for which we regrettably have few records. It was kind of you to offer me the letters but I do not think I could use them; if you were looking for a new home for them, though, the National Archives of Singapore might very well be interested.

Brindisi, P & O Sumatra, 7th May

My dear Effie

Just a line to you, besides my longer letter to Mama to let you know that I am actually in Europe and hope to reach Victoria Station by the Saturday morning mail from Dover (6.15 am I think).

If you are in town I will go to 29 P.G.T [Palace Gardens Terrace] for break. Just looking in at Ashley House on my way, though I dare say Auntie has not yet returned from Cannes. I will not attempt to express my feelings till Saturday. I am like the Merry Pieman in the Bad Ballads -- if I am not singing tra la la I'm singing tra lire.

My route is by Venice, Munich and I think Brussels, spending Wednesday in Munich where a letter will find me.

Your loving Brother,
Allan

P.S. I shall go on to Devon on Sunday or Monday, but return for longer stay about the days of your birthday. Please inform (?) Pap of my movements if he is in London.
Such a pen!



END

Dear Effie,

My boxes have just arrived and I have paid 2/9 (receipts enclosed). If you have already paid, as you told Auntie you meant to do, reclaim the money. I will send in a day or to Cliffy’s knapsack (give him my best thanks for it) containing the little bottle and last part of the "can you forgive her" (bought abroad), a charming finish to a first-rate novel. I shall pre-pay. Send me back (unless wanted) the two enclosed views of Cologne Cathedral and Antwerp spire and with love to all at home. Believe me (longing for news) Your affectionate brother, Allan


[The year of the letter below must have been 1865, the year of J A C Skinner’s birth in Cleveland, USA]

53 Norfolk Square,
26 September

Dear Effie,

I must write a farewell letter to Brocton, tho’ it will be a letter more of sensibility than of sense. I expect you will receive it at Brocton for if the inventory is to be ‘taken up’ on Tuesday you will hardly get away the same day. I received a letter from you on Saturday telling of Mamma’s departure and one from Mamma herself dated from near Lancaster this morning. It enclosed a little note from Johnny. I wonder how the latest edition of a Skinner is now and which sex he/she honors? I suggested Cleveland as a pretty and appropriate name. They (Mamma and party) seem to have made a good journey so far.

Tomorrow you too will be on Morecombe Bay (do you remember our last view of it?) and Brocton will know us no more. Did you ever hear the beautiful Arabic lines: “I came to the place of my childhood and cried ‘where?’ And echo answered ‘where?’”

Let your eyes take a last embrace for me for I shall never have a nearer or longer view than the glimpse afforded by the L & NW Rail’y Co. Little Walter will never know the place at all, except in the tradition of birth. I hope I shall come to you some time while you are at the Lakes. I want to see them very much. Aunty leaves London today fortnight and Alice and she are going to Italy. I send you the pretty little card used at the Wiesbaden Cursaal, which I have just fished up.

Mamma seems to have changed her plans and intends to go to Silloth instead of Grange. Papa wrote from Bandou in high spirits at their lucky chance in County Cork, and hopeful of getting me a nomination thro’ some new influence. I hope I shall get one and make use of my newly-acquired Geography (general intelligence) etc (this latter is regularly taught tho’ it does sound rather vague to the handling).

Love to Brocton and long remembrances of it and its remembrances – long as Life.

Allan Skinner.


24 Dorchester Place
6 June 1866

Dearest Effie

All possible good wishes, conceivable and inconceivable, from Bodger to the Duke of Eden, and yours for this so auspicious anniversary. If it did not seem to me (bred on latter-day utilitarianism) useless in the extreme, I should certainly devote a good bit of tomorrow in indulging in the most extravagant potentialities: "may you live to sketch the antipodean sketches of London ruins;" "and forget like the old man who died last spring in Michigan to which generation you belong;" "may your friends be as numerous and perennial as ivy-leaves, and your enemies as deciduous as willow;" "may good digestion wait on appetite as well as abundant John and Louey plentifully supplied with that fare which “none deserve but the brave"; as to the other kind that we may take for granted; - with many more wishes of the same sort.

I am sorry to have missed being with you on your birthday, but I suppose you have heard of Johnny’s proposed journey tomorrow. I have not seen him today, so he may have changed plan, but he told me yesterday that he should leave Louey to manage the proofs, and go and see Mamma. I shall ask him to take you down a small book of Ruskin's “(?) and Lilies" as an unassertive present. It is neatly bound and quite a find in money value; it will not be fair to be too grateful as it was bought with an immediate purpose of self-gratification. I like the lectures very much, especially the second.

I was astonished to see on reading Maud’s letter this evening that the party at Kent’s Bank has dissolved “like snow from the mountains” -- exactly like. What an energetic move on Walter’s part to take a 200 mile drive! But I'm sorry to hear of Henry’s indisposition and removal. I hope it is quite a temporary breakdown. Now I suppose you can stay on at the Hotel as long as you like, having resolved your party into such (?) elements. Was this the reason for the general remove?

I went down to Petersham the other evening to play croquet with Carry’s friends the Walkers. In the evening I walked on to Richmond and called on the Maurices(?). I found them all at home and in a very comfortable house. Mrs M. is looking very well. Miss Edith looks in her deep mourning like that child's photo of her. Miss Nelly’s engagement has melted, apparently through a sort of mutual obliviscence, for both the families are still friendly. Indeed Hetty is staying there - I suppose as Mortimer's fiancée. They were very friendly and of course asked kindly after you. They go back to North Wales in August.

When are Florry and Walter coming to Town? And all of you? Aunty and Alice both asked me to speak as to their real wish for Katie’s bridal services. I wish she might (?)

Give my love to all left by the (?) Bank, and take it intensified yourself
With all brotherly congratulations

I remain your loving brother, Allan.


January 1, 1867

Dear Effie,

I must emphasise the fact of New Year's Day by dating some letter with the new numeral. Of course the letter goes to you, as to whom else should it go.

Maud and I were so delighted, in a sentimental way, with the inaugurative snow of last midnight. We ran out, after the most ecstatic mutual good wishes, to hear the clashing bells, and low! the old Year in its last moments "had hid its guilty front with innocent snow." Such a fine last day, and such a lusty cheery first day. When the sun went down on the evening of the 31st crimson and bright, I suggested that “it must be of consumption the Old Year lay a-dying," with its bright look and flushed cheeks.

I do hope that we may take a hopeful promise from the brightness of outer things, and that if you see in the next year under changed conditions, then that those conditions may prove, as they always should prove, changed for the better.

But however these things be, cleverest little sister, love and all earnest good wishes to you for evermore from my fullest heart.

Allan

From: http://news.webshots.com/photo/1145425050055615433KhshpD

"Allan Maclean Skinner,Resident Councillor of Penang from(1887-1897).He used to serve as Inspector General of Schools, Hospitals and Prisons under Anson. 1881- Colonial treasurer and Auditor-General Skinner was the first Resident Councillor who took reside at the official residence called Residency (now Seri Mutiara) n 1890. He was the President of George Town Municipal Council.He married Ellen Shelford.He died in 1901.His issue:- i)John Harding Skinner. ii)Caroline Emily Skinner.Married to Reverend Robert James Edmund Boggis. iii)Clifton Maclean Skinner. iv)Alan Leonard Dorney Skinner.Married to Ina. v)Ellen Florance Skinner.Married to Reverend W.G.Cobbett. vi)William Shelford Skinner. vii)Mildred Skinner."


What started this sudden interest in the Skinner line was the discovery in my copy of Robinson Crusoe - which jn fact belonged toAllan McLean Skinner - of the address 'Marine Sq' in Brighton. Staying there this last weekend I tracked down in the library the number at which he had lived: 23. And that he was there in 1845. It is a fine house and right on the sea.

Dominic Jacob

(Dominic is a RC priest living in Oxford in 2012 who is a descendant of Allan's eldest son)
Biography
Barton Fields
Canterbury
England From 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families' December 1902 pages 82 to 84:

>> 5. Allan Maclean Skinner, C.M.G., the younger son of Allan Maclean Skinner, Q.C., was born at Brighton on the 20th March, 1846, and died at Canterbury on the 14th June, 1901.
He was educated at Bruce Castle School, where he distinguished himself. In June, 1867, he was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn, and shortly afterwards entered the Civil Service of the Straits Settlements, then recently created, passing first in the examinations. This was the commencement of thirty years of continuous and honourable service in the Malay Peninsula.
Onthe 23rd September, 1875, he married at St. Saviour's, Clapham, Miss Ellen Shelford, daughter of the Rev. William Heard Shelford, rector of Preston St. Mary, Suffolk, and sister of Mr. Thomas Shelford, C.M.G., of Singapore. Their children are:

John Harding Skinner born 16th Sept., 1876
Caroline Emily Skinner born 18th Sept., 1877
Clifton Maclean Skinner born 19th Feb., 1879
Alan Leonard Dorney Skinner born 2nd Nov., 1880
Ellen Florance Skinner born 13th July 1884
William Shelford Skinner born 19th Dec., 1886
Mildred Skinner born 10th Sept., 1890


In 188I Mr. Allan Maclean Skinner was appointed Auditor-General, with a seat on the Legislative Council. He acted as Colonial Secretary of the Straits Settlements from 1884 to 1889, and as Deputy Governor in 1885. In 1887 he was appointed Resident Councillor of Penang, which appointment he continued to hold until his retirement in 1897, combining with it from 1888 onwards the office of Her Majesty's Consul for the Siamese States.
He took an active part in the bombardment of Selangor in 187I, the Perah negotiations in 1874, the Muir election in 1877, and in the proceedings generally which established the British Protectorate of the Malay Peninsula.
He was the first Inspector of Schools in the Colony and the originator of its educational system.
In 189I he was decorated with the Companionship of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in recognition of his public services.
During his residence in the East he contributed to local journals, and when his retirement from the service of his country brought with it time and leisure - though unfortunately accompanied by failing health - he devoted himself still more to literary pursuit. He wrote a history of Eastern Geography, which was published by Stanford and Co., and at the time of his death he was engaged on a history of the Straits Settlements. He also wrote much poetry. The following of his verses are quoted here as having a special and appropriate interest. They were written about his mother, Mrs. Caroline Emily Skinner, in January and February, 1901, immediately after her death, and only about four months before he himself passed away.


From 'Straits Settlements Civil Service List 1893', sent to me by Winson Saw:

"Skinner, Allan Maclean, C.M.G. Resident Councillor of Penang. First appointed in Public Service and first appointment in the colony - 24 November 1868; appointment as Councillor - 12 September 1887; annual salary - $9600;
SERVICE IN THE COLONY: Admitted to a cadetship S. S., 24 Nov 1868; passed final examination in Malay - 18 Nov 1870; Acting Magistrate P. W., April 1871 to 1873; Inspector of schools and prisons, 1873; Inspector of hospitals in addition, May 1873; thrice Acting Assistant Colonial Secretary between 1874 and 1879; confirmed as Assistant Colonial Secretary and Clerk of Councils July 1879; Auditor-General S.S., May 1881; Colonial Treasurer, Collector of Stamps and Accountant-General of the Supreme Court, S. S., 1 May 1882; Acting Colonial Secretary from March 1884 to October 1885; appointed Resident Councillor of P., 12 September 1887; but before taking up the appointment was again Acting Colonial Secretary from Nov 1887 to Nov 1889. Absent on leave from 8 July 1875 to 29 February 1876, from 13 July 1880 to 13 May 1881, from 1 January 1886 to 2 March 1887, and from November 1889 to 9 March 1890 and from 24 October 1891 to 1 November 1892. Is a Justice of the Peace, P.
GENERAL REMARKS: Admitted to the Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn, December 1863. Called to the Bar in Trinity Term 1867. Appointed Civil Comissioner to accompany the Rinaldo Expedition against Selangor in July 1871. Attended Governor Sir A. Clarke in the Pangkor Negotiations (January 1874); deputed to attend the Muar election, November 1877; appointed British Consul for the Siamese States of the West Coast of the Malay Peninsula, April 1888.

"Her Fifty Years"

Her fifty years, fast-bound in such a bond,
Must shame our murmurs; her delight in earth.
Her radiant vision of the Life beyond.
Brace other spirits. That abounding mirth
But for a moment rests upon the shelf:
--Her tired life has overslept itself.

"One Journey more"

One journey more for her, who many a year
In all its length had travelled through the land,
And held its green and living changes dear;-
To-day her children watch Life's failing sand.
And closing lids. For them, like her, before
Our eyes can meet again, one journey more.

"When all is still."

When all is still - the only comfort now
Speak softly as we used to, lest she hear
The.broken whispers in the room below
There lies the silent face we held so dear
--Age in its beauty; with its reverend brow.
Though coffined, yet a spirit brave and clear

" She ruled us well"

She ruled us well: the only lawful throne
Is loving strength, which cannot lose control.
As star to planet, may not soul to soul
Strike through some finer ether of its own?
Since loyal hearts are lords of human fate,
And neither dare usurp nor abdicate!

"The view she loved"*

The view she loved so well and made her own
Through many a sunset, many a sunny morn,
A deeper mystery will now adorn: -
Below, the shadows of the cliff are thrown,
The broad bay lies to westward; and afar
The great white wastes of water on the Bar.

"Dust to dust, ashes to ashes"

Now Life has paid its penalty:
And Faith reclaimed her fealty:
- O Grave, where is thy victory?
O Death, what hast thou won?

The selfishness that sways a man,
The anguish that dismays a man,
The passion that betrays a man,
Are over now and done;

The work completed valiantly,
The fight concluded gallantly.
The hope upheld triumphantly
For evermore go on!

He died at Canterbury, where he had lived since his retirement, and was on the 17th June, 1901, buried in the churchyard at St. Martin's.

*This was the view from Stone House, Abbotsham; the window of Mrs. C. E. Skinner's room commanded an uninterrupted view of Bideford Bay from Hartland Point to Baggy. <<

END

From the Calendar of wills at FRC:

SKINNER, Allan Maclean of Barton Fields Canterbury died 23 February 1901. Probate London 6 July to the reverend John Harding Skinner clerk. Effects £2,494 9s 6d.


From Winson Saw, Penang, Malaysia, April 2004:

"The reason why I'm interested in Allan Maclean Skinner is personal interest in pictures of Governors of Penang and Malacca during British era. As promised, I attach photos of Allan Maclean Skinner & Residency (place that Allan stayed when he was term of Resident Councillor (Governor) of Penang from (1887-1897).

Residency (now named as Seri Mutiara) built more than 100 years ago in Penang. Mr. A.M. Skinner was first Resident Councillor to stayed in this beautiful classical building. In 1890, just few month after it became local political place. Resident Councillor was also elect as President of Municipal Council of Georgetown shortly after their arrived in Penang. By that time many wealthy European forced for local political cases to return to them. Resident Councillor also as President of Municipal Council of Georgetown but European in there forced The Governors of Straits Settlements to elect one of them became President of Municipal Council of Georgetown. By reason saying that The Resident Councillor more act as Asst. to the Governor and didn't care about them mean European people. Sir Cecil Clementi Smith, Governor of Straits Settlements at that time understand the situation. Therefore he elected Mr.J.Y.Kennedy, owner of Pinang Gazette the local newspaper became President of Municipal Council of Georgetown in late year 1891 when Mr.Skinner on leave in Europe. Mr.Allan Maclean Skinner was last Resident Councillor elected as President of Municipal Council of Georgetown."

From Winson Saw, July 2004:

"Dear Alan,

Allan Maclean Skinner used to serve as Inspector General of Schools, Hospitals and Prisons under Anson. 1881- Colonial treasurer and Auditor-General. Skinner was the first Resident Councillor who took reside at the official residence called Residency (now Seri Mutiara) n 1890. He was the President of George Town Municipal Council.
Cheers,
Winson Saw"

From Winson Saw, December 2005:

Winson Saw, my email correspondent, sent me the file called 'Supreme Court of The Straits Settlements, 1868', scanned from 'Malaya Law Review Vol.2 No.1 July 1969' by J.W.Norton Kyshe. It gives the membership of the Supreme Court in 1868. Winson also sent scans of the 1937 Silver Jubilee Celebrations in Old Penang. He wrote: "The Penang Residency is where Alan Maclean Skinner lived at the time he became Resident Councillor (Governor) of Penang. I have included that picture too. Just bought these old books from a flea market friend". For more recent photos of Old Penang see http://www.webshots.com/search?new=1&source=mdocsheader&words=Old+Penang

JAC Pearce said, in 2004:

"A M Skinner helped Swettenham to found the Malay Settlements, ie to bring them under British control. His daughter married Boggis and they had a son who was a distinguished airman - he bombed Berlin." [Letter from Allan Skinner to his sister Euphemia, wife of Holroyd Chaplin]


Grand Hotel, Venice
9th May 1875 (Monday)

My dear Effie

It seems almost incredible that I should really be sitting on the Grand Canal at Venice "where the merchants were the Kings, where St Mark’ is, where the Doges used to wed the sea with rings”

I have enjoyed the last 24 hours in the same sort of way that one enjoys a pleasant dream -- only I hope to have a better recollection of all I have seen. Fancy coming from Singapore to Venice at one leap; the emporium of today is an excellent counterfoil to that of Marco Polo. A modern Marco finds all his amazement comes on returning from the East not on getting out there. I have been revelling in the stony beauties and the painted wonders of the place and am just off for my last visit to the Palace and the Prison "on each hand". But for an account of them I must wait till next Saturday.

My immediate object is to tell you of an improvement in my plans, by which I shall see the Dolomites but shall in all probability be delayed till Saturday evening at 6 p.m.. Mr Malcolm the P&O agent here has very civilly offered to be Cicerone and I have agreed to go with him through the mountains.

Please tell John of my movements, in case he is at Dover Brussels or Paris and happens to be coming over on Saturday. It strikes me as a very likely that Florry will be about returning from Cannes, but I received no letter here to say whether I could be of any use in escorting her.

Your loving brother
A Chaplin
[Undated letter probably from Allan Maclean Skinner to his mother Caroline Emily Harding. It was probably sent in the autumn of 1865, when he would have been 19 (see his bet, below)]

Across the top is written: Sept 6th. Dearest Papa, I forward to you this letter of Ally’s that came yesterday. The Chestnut is quite well again. Mama is very poorly. Please return this to Mama. Love to ? How is your ankle? Your affectionate child, Effie.

Ashley House, Monday

Dearest Mamma,
I report myself returned and have kept as near time as the steamers would permit. I left Wiesbaden on Thursday and came to Antwerp almost direct to catch the Sunday boat, the only one for nearly a week. I stayed exactly a week at Wiesbaden and found plenty to see and do there. The German watering places are very gay and have a great advantage over ours in the play-table institution; for they (the gaming company) find their revenues so much increased by having a large number of visitors that they are willing to spend thousands in making the place attractive. In Wiesbaden they have laid out a park with a jet 120 feet in height, built a regular palace for gambling rooms and reading rooms, and give concerts and a magnificent ball (réunion dansante) weekly. The "spielfische" were very interesting to watch, especially as a face-study. Some of the players, especially the women showed an interest in their money but in general the coins are viewed merely as counters are at a muffin-worry. A few Frenchman derive a regular income from play, but to do this they must have acquired a great command over their impulses and must never let their temper? defy chance as do most new hands at the siren sport. The Prince and Princess of Wales were at Wiesbaden just before I came, and Prince lost three pounds in a few seconds but then retired. Everyone who watches much is expected sometimes to lay down a coin, so I put a florin on my years, number 19; but fate and the Croupier were inexorable and my contribution was raked in to the support of the vicious institution. The Croupiers are considered gentleman by profession and the regular gamblers even are not cut, but a salutary law prevents a Nassasurian from playing.

The ball was great fun; a magnificent marble hall and polished oak floor to dance on, 2 military bands to dance to, and cosmopolitan beauty to dance with. All nationalities and all styles of face and dress were and there must have been from 400 to 600 people. Not many however danced, on account of an etiquette forbidding any formal introduction. Such an opportunity for young girls of from 13 to 16 many of whom are taken there and enjoy it so much. The Germans dance very well, especially the gentlemen. Wiesbaden has lovely walks about it and on Monday last (28th) Alice gave a birthday picnic. Her guests were nearly all Germans, old girl friends of her childhood and Nassaurian officers, modern friends of her grown-up world. The whole thing was very German, the party first strolled up into the forest, ate ices, effervesced with hilarity; played a German kiss in the ring (without the kissing or any sort of Cockney romping) and then went back to a “wirschschaft”, an aristocratic tea garden.

On the way back one of the Germans, the funny-dog of the party, told a tale from Shakespeare, in honour of the English hostess, and then they all sang together, and very prettily too. Alice gave a very good supper, plenty of wine, fruit etc, nearly all the guests presented her with a bouquet separately and the officers collectively with an enormous one; their leader went through the German ceremony of hand kissing, and the biggest wig present made a speech in her honour to which I had to return thanks. After supper we danced several hours in the room hired for the purpose. It was a great success; and the most pleasing and German part of it all was that £2.10 covered all the expenses.

I chaperoned Alice out riding one day and though riding a horse fond of a run-away, she acquitted herself very well. The Rufus association is hardly fair now. I managed to go and "do" Frankfurt; it is indeed "a some interesting place" as my fair Bostonians observed, from whom I parted here for the different paths our fates assign at last. There is a famous Jew-street here -- a monument to Christian intolerance -- where a 4000 Jews were cooped up and never allowed to issue for several hundred years. In spite of all this tyranny they could not prevent the Groby family (Rothschild) is from rising high enough to heap coals of fire upon their heads by coming to be the city’s greatest benefactors. Goethe’s house too is much honoured and is likely to have a much better passage through the centuries than the little Warwick cottage. I left Wiesbaden on Thursday with Alice and Miss Vautier, the lady lodging-keeper. The two latter came with me in order to see the Rhine, but I left them at Coblenz and went straight on through Cologne to Antwerp. I have had a pleasant and smooth passage today but we fore-passengers had a great nuisance in the shape of live cattle -- a plague speculation -- with whom we were mixed "promiscuous-like". The money part of the two are has been very satisfactory, the hotels cheap, and the worst swindling four shillings for bed and breakfast. I have been able to travel second-class in Germany (because of the dirty smoking habits), third in Belgium, best cabin of the Rhine-boats (the whole thing insignificantly cheap), and put up at good second-class hotels for under £9, including some purchases of reminiscences etc.. Of the other £1: 13 shillings the journey to London etc. and seven shillings in a handsome birthday present I made to Alice as a kind of return for her generosity to me. She paid all the week’s expenses at Wiesbaden and gave me a concert ticket to hear German students sing choruses, and was very kind and pleasant throughout.

I am however now money-less and indeed could not breakfast on board this morning on account of the large charge and my narrow purse. Send me something to go on with. Ask Effie to tell me all plans and where are Florry and Walter and if there has been anything more on the Civil Service subject and what you think now about a "tutor" and whether I shall find one out myself. I will write a few business lines to Effie -- so with best love and many thanks for the very pleasant tour which I feel to have “widened the alleys of my mind”.

I remain your loving son, Allan.
[I think the undated letter below, in a lively style, is from Allan Jnr, who certainly had to do with Singapore, but I don’t know whether he was writing from there. All his other letters to her start ‘Dear Effie’ but this ends “Yr loving Br, Allan”. I assume it was the exam which did or didn’t lead to his selection for the Civil Service of the Straits Settlements – he mentions a failure in the other letter from this address.]

24 Old Square
W’nesday

Dearest Pip,

I must write and tell you that it is over, but I can’t tell you more yet. I shall not know for a week or more but I can’t help thinking that I have done for this knotty head. He turns out an aristocrat and an Honourable Elliott (son of Lord Heathfield) – so naturally think of that popular rhyme (sung by Mr Parrel and quoted by Maud) of:

“One day I met an aristocrat, ristocrat, ristocrat
I rode up against him and knocked him flat”

Amen! But it turns out he has lived in Germany and of course has a great pull there, particularly as they made us speak all the modern languages by way I suppose of testing that material aptitude they frightened all of us about. They asked me whether I wished to speak Italian and German – fancy wishing to be shot at alive á la Deerslayer? with the delicious excitement of wondering how far such shot would sticke. But I took it out of the Frenchman by way of compensation; and as more experienced together in that subject, I was able to see for certain that I knew more of that language than he did. You will be able to find out specifically how I did in each, whether I pass and am “far, far away” or failed and am all too near, the Commiss’rs publish the report of all exam’s. and as there were only two in ours you can tell which is for me. It appears there was a third at first who soon dropped out of the running. I am very worn and neuralgic; with a sleepless night last night, relieved that it is over. I hope I shall feel better tomorrow. If not I must wait for the climate of Singapore to mend me as so to speak it has marred me.

Love and thanks for your letter. Allan


[I haven’t been able to date this letter. “Edith married on the 17th” – Edith Pyne was married on 2nd January 1868 which seems a reasonable year – perhaps the date changed but more likely Edith was a Carr – a friend. From the tone of the letter he was still young and working in London presumably as a barrister, which narrows it to between 1864 and 1870. Johnny was working in the City in 1864 and Holroyd was in London. I have decided to quess at 1868, but it is just a guess]

24 Old Square,
Friday

Dear Effie

I agree that our parting was as vague and as "unprepared for as Death”. I meant to have gone with Holroyd but W.C. came and restricted me to that pretty piece of the landscape above Angmering(?) Church; then I turned back and bad farewell to Sussex -- and indeed to Summer.

We are going to have a sharp time of it I doubt this winter. At any rate it comes on us early. How is Hayling for skating? Johnny comes back loud with its praises. He says Mama has at last earned the reward of all her travellings. It is like Ulysses and his "Happy Isles". Could they ever have been Hayling and others since devoured by the oysters? Johnny duly arrived yesterday afternoon and Holroyd asked me to meet him (?) at Old 35. Johnny told us of you and your last appearance and the funny little railway and the fun about Havant etc. -- and some of us were very much interested.

We were to have gone out (à la ‘Jolly Days’) to see the re-decorated Marylebone Theatre, but Louey used her privilege of Veto at the eleventh hour (11pm). Friday the civilities were returned at No 24, with a hot lunch at 1.30 p.m. (?) and I have just returned from the city where I said goodbye to J. Tomorrow morning he starts, after breakfast with (?). You should pay me another visit now. My walls, my furniture and my bookshelf have all the "passed underneath the yoke of change".

One picture (of the single available Skinner distingué) is Papa’s present and looks very well. The other is Clif’s. But alas for the days of Brocton and Thompson's cottage! Economy has foisted upon me a hated gilt frame which has scuffed out Cliffy’s delicate pastel covering. I sigh for the solid gold oak frames that are bound up with memories of you and the bygone! The frames that cost (?) and next to nothing. Here they are 5/6. I have put in a claim, on strict Positivist grounds, to the old picture of Uncle James. He is especially my uncle on that side by some mysterious rule of inheritance and descent. He will hang over my closet door in place of the horseshoe for it has been well suggested that to keep away the D. (W Deb) might be almost unprofessional if carried out strictly, and long keep my door closed to the leading client.

My furniture has been disarranged by a new round table to supply the one Shirley at last claimed. It comes from Aunty’s bedroom where Mr Mac said it was only in the way. I wish you were likely to come and see it all again. You will still recognise the wall and the bookshelf for which you are the responsible artist. It was closely threatened on the arrival of the table but sentiment prevailed -- Amen!

I'm off to dine with the Carrs by invite and régle, so I supposed it to be specially grand; for I have one of those delightful invitations there that "stands over". Edith is married on the 17th -- the anniversary of my last autumn’s failure - so much for this part(?) of my life. Now for Chapter II or Volume II where the race is for the swift and the battle to the strong. Give the enclosed to Mamma.

You're loving brother
Allan
Singapore, January 29th, 1874

My dear Effie

From Aunty’s letter describing the receipt and distribution of the shawls etc. which Mr Grace took home for me, it seems that I was not very clear as to who was to get them. The intention was to give the shawls to the good mothers and the small articles, hoods or whatever they are called, to the (?)ixties -- Seniores priores in selection.

Cleve wrote me such a letter by last mail -- all about Turks and infidels Cubans and blockade-runners it quite took my breath away. I felt ten years older when I had done my affectionate nephew’s despatch. I am waiting for a leisure hour to reply in proper style. I shall begin to expect disquisitions in Greek (and Stewart Mill) from my godson, next half.

We have had great doings in these parts, crowning Sultans and annexing kingdoms, of which I have written to Devonshire in more detail. The joke is that everybody is congratulating me on being appointed first Resident -- as I reply "everyone but the right person has told me so." Unfortunately I am sufficiently behind the scenes to know it's not really so, though I hope it may be some day. In the meantime it is very gratifying to see our colony developing (and its appointments pari passu of course) with every promise of beating Ceylon some day, who is at present the spoiled child of the family

Your ever affectionate brother
Allan

PS I do not want the Law report for next year. I believe there is a small balance of my money left. I should like the Pall Mall budget continued; and will you ask Holroyd to pay the Civil Service Store £2 or so I shall owe them for an order I am sending next French Mail above and beyond the £10 P. O. order accompanying it. A. M. C.


Singapore, January 25th [1875]

My dearest Effie,

Of course it is far too late to tell you of my engagement as a piece of news for I am sure you will have heard it already. It is one of affection of course and on this and every other ground I feel more satisfied every day with what I have done. I began to think I was getting too old and hardened a sinner ever to feel "in love" again. It seemed clear that a "furlough" attachment could only lead to a “marriage in haste,” which I dislike as much as you, I know, always did; and judging from our marriages the whole Skinner family seems to agree with us.

And yet it seemed that no alternative was offered me. I must meet (?), wed and all in 12 months, or prepare to go unwedded. However my usual good fortune has not deserted me; as you will agree when you know my dear Nelly.

Really we have seen as much of each other, with better means of judging, during the last nine months than one could during as many years in London. It is a small society and a small place; morning walks, (?)-days, croquets are all so many opportunities of meeting; of which I soon began to take every advantage.

The congratulations and knowing looks etc. etc. are almost over now; and it is very pleasant. I am glad it is known. I am not good at secrets. So I ride old Tully over every morning while still almost dark and then a short walk with my dear girl, and then on Tully once more and a spin home before it is too hot. This and an occasional (?) kettledrum is all the time for (?) an overworked government can spare its Assistant Secretary.

We had a good long drive back from (?)hore on Saturday with my little ponies -- but she generally drives me, having a grand equipage of her own. The fact is she is a great "swell" out here, for one in native parlance described as "Missee." The climate is not favourable to the species heiress whom we never see by any chance.

She carries it off with a charming absence of the ton manière which some ladies with grand carriages generally assume. I am sure I shall like her better if possible when she resumes the part of (?)’s bride at Clapham Common. Of all I have ever known as well I should choose her for my wife, even if I were not in love with her.

I have given you a regular nuptial ode have I not? But I know you will be interested. She will probably go home at the end of March -- a month or more before I do.
Your loving brother, Allan.



[Letter from Allan Maclean Skinner CMG’s wife Nelly (Ellen)]

Clarendon Hotel, Singapore. April 19

My dear Carrie

Many thanks for your note and the photo of yourself which came by the last mail - it shall go into the red Russian leather album we bought in London, amongst the other members of the two families, and I hope will long keep its pretty English complexion.

I was so sorry to hear that poor Mr Skinner had been suffering so much. I am afraid the latter end of the winter was more trying to many people. My mother says that she has hardly left the house at all.

I wrote an account of our doings to Auntie last week, and I hope to write to Louey very soon. She was so good in writing to enquire for Allan when he was ill several times, and I must write and thank her. Will you give her my love? Meanwhile -- has Allan told you of the formation of a society for the prevention of cruelty to animals here? The start has been a good one. At the first meeting about three weeks ago, there were 24 people of the pick of Singapore who have subscribed liberally towards the expenses. Mr Hervey is the business secretary and of course Allan is a member. It is quite necessary that a check should be put upon natives who are most brutal towards dumb creatures. We have seen two instances of the cruelty practised on them within the last two days.

We took a trip on Easter Eve to the seaside. There is a place called (?) Panjong about four miles off where people go for change of air and sea-bathing. Two friends (?) and we had a nice little tea party down there in a picnic style. The tide alas was too low for bathing and we drove home when it was cool.

I must not take up more room in Allan’s letter so will only add kind love to all.

Yours very affectionately
Nelly

[No year given]

Singapore, 20.4

My dearest Mother

I am so sorry to hear that the cold winter has proved so trying; surely the summer has come now. I feel sympathy with that philosopher in Leech’s picture who buried the drunkard and wished he had "half his complaint". I wish we had half yours. The weather is unusually hot and dry for Singapore. I almost wish I were to be sent to "the seat of war" for some of those places are high and cool.

The Government has behaved well to me now in firing this double duty (i.e. double pay) but it has called forth the indignation of one journal and the injudicious sympathy of another, which speaks of me as "a vilifended official"! Meanwhile the additional salary is very serviceable in the present state of the money market. Money market most literally, for the silver in which we are paid is gradually going down in value -- just as if it were tea or sugar. All our things have arrived safely. I am out at 7 a.m. and never get home till 5 p.m.. But I am all the better for it so far, and Nellie keeps well too.

Love and thanks to Carrie for her letter and photo. It was the only one last mail and indeed the only one for the last three mails! But I don't want you to trouble about writing. I can think about you so easily -- and I do so often -- without it.

Ever your loving son
Allan




[From Effie’s age below - 1877]

Govt Hill, Singapore. 10th June

My dear Effie

At last we have got into our new house and find ourselves very comfortable after the hot sea side. Everything is so contrarywise in the tropics - that the sea is the hottest place to build. Now we are in what is generally considered the best bungalow of its size in Singapore. Of course it is not so cool as (?), but then it is only one mile instead of 4 from town. Above us frowns the very grand but rather gloomy Govt house, and we have the benefits of its pretty gardens. Your poor friend Birch was the last tenant after whom the married ADC (Captain Paton) was quartered there. [see footnote below, ARJ.]

It is almost too late to say "happy returns", though we did not forget to think of you and drink to you on the seventh with fond recollections of last year. We were dining out with my old house-chum George Anson on that day; but on the following day we had a small party chiefly composed of “the service”, and all my new things were shown off, much approved of. That is Nelly's department -- so I leave it to her. I know she intends to write to you.

I am leaving her a grass widow today, having to go on a visit of inspection to Penang. I leave at 4pm today and must be brief. I hope Holroyd got my letter and remittances. I received in turn a large (?) by last mail and also the first of the Pall Malls. Many thanks; and again or rather at last, the best wishes for your 30th year (you seem to wish to be made out as old as possible -- I feel all too young). I hope dear you will write me long letters in the old-style sometimes and tell me all about Nugent the "latest."

Kind regards to Holroyd
your affectionate brother
Allan Skinner

ARJ footnote: I was contacted by email by Duncan Sutherland on 24 July 2009, a freelance historian living in Singapore. He wrote that he had “just finished a chapter of a book about a house called Sri Temasek. Between 1869 and 1959 this was the home of the colonial secretary, a post which your ancestor Allan Skinner temporarily held on a few occasions in the 1880s.” I sent him the possibly relevant part of the first paragraph above and he replied as below, with a photo.

“Today I checked the Straits Settlement Blue Books and found some information that may help date the letter. Capt. Paton was ADC from 1875 until 1876 or 1877. Allan Skinner was inspector of schools, prisons, hospitals and the police until 1879, when he became assistant colonial secretary. He might have moved into a new house in 1877 without getting a promotion, or may have written in 1879 when he became assistant colonial secretary. There was an assistant colonial secretary's house where the first president of Singapore lived and which has since been torn down. It would make sense if he moved into a new residence with his new job, but odd that Birch and Paton would have lived there.

I have a sneaking fear that, much as I would like to add this to my chapter, he was writing about another house. This photo [scan0003.jpg in this folder] shows one of the demolished bungalows (not the assistant colonial secretary's but another one), on which one could say that Government House was frowning down. Sri Temasek is further away, though, so his description would not be so apt.”

I asked Duncan about Birch. He replied:

“You are probably right about 'there' referring to Government House; I can see the ADC being quartered at Government House as there were many rooms and the governor's private secretary did have accommodation there. But Birch was Colonial Secretary, no.2 in the government, from 1870 to 1874 and should have lived in the colonial secretary's bungalow. He should not have lived in Government House, except temporarily during the governor's absence. He would not have been the last tenant of Government House by 1877, still less 1879, as there would have been other acting governors since then. The governors were often away.

He was 'poor' Birch as he was murdered in Perak in 1875. The British sent an expedition to track down his killers and exiled the sultan who gave the order. Birch was not popular with the Malays - and even among the British, I read a hilariously derisive editorial about him in one of the newspapers. His death is a touchy subject in Malaysia, with I think most Malays today seeing his death as a blow against imperialism. I don't know where he would have met Allan Skinner's sister.

Even if 'there' does mean Government House, this letter seems likely to have been 1877 or 1879 (either after Paton left or when Skinner was promoted) so it was probably not the colonial secretary's house into which he moved. I presume you don't have letters from the 1880s which describe his home.”

This has been an interesting correspondence. If there's anything else you're wondering please ask. My chapter passingly mentions Skinner as one of the interesting people who lived in the house during its early years for which we regrettably have few records. It was kind of you to offer me the letters but I do not think I could use them; if you were looking for a new home for them, though, the National Archives of Singapore might very well be interested.
Brindisi, P & O Sumatra, 7th May

My dear Effie

Just a line to you, besides my longer letter to Mama to let you know that I am actually in Europe and hope to reach Victoria Station by the Saturday morning mail from Dover (6.15 am I think).

If you are in town I will go to 29 P.G.T [Palace Gardens Terrace] for break. Just looking in at Ashley House on my way, though I dare say Auntie has not yet returned from Cannes. I will not attempt to express my feelings till Saturday. I am like the Merry Pieman in the Bad Ballads -- if I am not singing tra la la I'm singing tra lire.

My route is by Venice, Munich and I think Brussels, spending Wednesday in Munich where a letter will find me.

Your loving Brother,
Allan

P.S. I shall go on to Devon on Sunday or Monday, but return for longer stay about the days of your birthday. Please inform (?) Pap of my movements if he is in London.
Such a pen!



END
Dear Effie,

My boxes have just arrived and I have paid 2/9 (receipts enclosed). If you have already paid, as you told Auntie you meant to do, reclaim the money. I will send in a day or to Cliffy’s knapsack (give him my best thanks for it) containing the little bottle and last part of the "can you forgive her" (bought abroad), a charming finish to a first-rate novel. I shall pre-pay. Send me back (unless wanted) the two enclosed views of Cologne Cathedral and Antwerp spire and with love to all at home. Believe me (longing for news) Your affectionate brother, Allan


[The year of the letter below must have been 1865, the year of J A C Skinner’s birth in Cleveland, USA]

53 Norfolk Square,
26 September

Dear Effie,

I must write a farewell letter to Brocton, tho’ it will be a letter more of sensibility than of sense. I expect you will receive it at Brocton for if the inventory is to be ‘taken up’ on Tuesday you will hardly get away the same day. I received a letter from you on Saturday telling of Mamma’s departure and one from Mamma herself dated from near Lancaster this morning. It enclosed a little note from Johnny. I wonder how the latest edition of a Skinner is now and which sex he/she honors? I suggested Cleveland as a pretty and appropriate name. They (Mamma and party) seem to have made a good journey so far.

Tomorrow you too will be on Morecombe Bay (do you remember our last view of it?) and Brocton will know us no more. Did you ever hear the beautiful Arabic lines: “I came to the place of my childhood and cried ‘where?’ And echo answered ‘where?’”

Let your eyes take a last embrace for me for I shall never have a nearer or longer view than the glimpse afforded by the L & NW Rail’y Co. Little Walter will never know the place at all, except in the tradition of birth. I hope I shall come to you some time while you are at the Lakes. I want to see them very much. Aunty leaves London today fortnight and Alice and she are going to Italy. I send you the pretty little card used at the Wiesbaden Cursaal, which I have just fished up.

Mamma seems to have changed her plans and intends to go to Silloth instead of Grange. Papa wrote from Bandou in high spirits at their lucky chance in County Cork, and hopeful of getting me a nomination thro’ some new influence. I hope I shall get one and make use of my newly-acquired Geography (general intelligence) etc (this latter is regularly taught tho’ it does sound rather vague to the handling).

Love to Brocton and long remembrances of it and its remembrances – long as Life.

Allan Skinner.


24 Dorchester Place
6 June 1866

Dearest Effie

All possible good wishes, conceivable and inconceivable, from Bodger to the Duke of Eden, and yours for this so auspicious anniversary. If it did not seem to me (bred on latter-day utilitarianism) useless in the extreme, I should certainly devote a good bit of tomorrow in indulging in the most extravagant potentialities: "may you live to sketch the antipodean sketches of London ruins;" "and forget like the old man who died last spring in Michigan to which generation you belong;" "may your friends be as numerous and perennial as ivy-leaves, and your enemies as deciduous as willow;" "may good digestion wait on appetite as well as abundant John and Louey plentifully supplied with that fare which “none deserve but the brave"; as to the other kind that we may take for granted; - with many more wishes of the same sort.

I am sorry to have missed being with you on your birthday, but I suppose you have heard of Johnny’s proposed journey tomorrow. I have not seen him today, so he may have changed plan, but he told me yesterday that he should leave Louey to manage the proofs, and go and see Mamma. I shall ask him to take you down a small book of Ruskin's “(?) and Lilies" as an unassertive present. It is neatly bound and quite a find in money value; it will not be fair to be too grateful as it was bought with an immediate purpose of self-gratification. I like the lectures very much, especially the second.

I was astonished to see on reading Maud’s letter this evening that the party at Kent’s Bank has dissolved “like snow from the mountains” -- exactly like. What an energetic move on Walter’s part to take a 200 mile drive! But I'm sorry to hear of Henry’s indisposition and removal. I hope it is quite a temporary breakdown. Now I suppose you can stay on at the Hotel as long as you like, having resolved your party into such (?) elements. Was this the reason for the general remove?

I went down to Petersham the other evening to play croquet with Carry’s friends the Walkers. In the evening I walked on to Richmond and called on the Maurices(?). I found them all at home and in a very comfortable house. Mrs M. is looking very well. Miss Edith looks in her deep mourning like that child's photo of her. Miss Nelly’s engagement has melted, apparently through a sort of mutual obliviscence, for both the families are still friendly. Indeed Hetty is staying there - I suppose as Mortimer's fiancée. They were very friendly and of course asked kindly after you. They go back to North Wales in August.

When are Florry and Walter coming to Town? And all of you? Aunty and Alice both asked me to speak as to their real wish for Katie’s bridal services. I wish she might (?)

Give my love to all left by the (?) Bank, and take it intensified yourself
With all brotherly congratulations

I remain your loving brother, Allan.


January 1, 1867

Dear Effie,

I must emphasise the fact of New Year's Day by dating some letter with the new numeral. Of course the letter goes to you, as to whom else should it go.

Maud and I were so delighted, in a sentimental way, with the inaugurative snow of last midnight. We ran out, after the most ecstatic mutual good wishes, to hear the clashing bells, and low! the old Year in its last moments "had hid its guilty front with innocent snow." Such a fine last day, and such a lusty cheery first day. When the sun went down on the evening of the 31st crimson and bright, I suggested that “it must be of consumption the Old Year lay a-dying," with its bright look and flushed cheeks.

I do hope that we may take a hopeful promise from the brightness of outer things, and that if you see in the next year under changed conditions, then that those conditions may prove, as they always should prove, changed for the better.

But however these things be, cleverest little sister, love and all earnest good wishes to you for evermore from my fullest heart.

Allan
From: http://news.webshots.com/photo/1145425050055615433KhshpD

"Allan Maclean Skinner,Resident Councillor of Penang from(1887-1897).He used to serve as Inspector General of Schools, Hospitals and Prisons under Anson. 1881- Colonial treasurer and Auditor-General Skinner was the first Resident Councillor who took reside at the official residence called Residency (now Seri Mutiara) n 1890. He was the President of George Town Municipal Council.He married Ellen Shelford.He died in 1901.His issue:- i)John Harding Skinner. ii)Caroline Emily Skinner.Married to Reverend Robert James Edmund Boggis. iii)Clifton Maclean Skinner. iv)Alan Leonard Dorney Skinner.Married to Ina. v)Ellen Florance Skinner.Married to Reverend W.G.Cobbett. vi)William Shelford Skinner. vii)Mildred Skinner."

What started this sudden interest in the Skinner line was the discovery in my copy of Robinson Crusoe - which jn fact belonged toAllan McLean Skinner - of the address 'Marine Sq' in Brighton. Staying there this last weekend I tracked down in the library the number at which he had lived: 23. And that he was there in 1845. It is a fine house and right on the sea.

Dominic Jacob

(Dominic is a RC priest living in Oxford in 2012 who is a descendant of Allan's eldest son)
Facts
  • 20 MAR 1846 - Birth - ; Brighton
  • 14 JUN 1901 - Death - ; Canterbury
  • DEC 1863 - Fact -
  • 16 MAY 1875 - Fact -
  • 1881 - Fact -
  • 1884 - Fact -
  • 1884 - Publications - ; The Eastern Geography (Singapore) 1884 - republished in London 1887, 2nd Edition 1892.
  • 1885 - Fact -
  • 1887 - Fact -
  • 1888 - Fact -
  • 1891 - Fact -
  • 1897 - Fact -
Ancestors
   
John Major Skinner , Lieut General
16 FEB 1752 - 10 OCT 1827
 
 
Allan Maclean Skinner , Q.C.
14 JUL 1809 - 23 MAY 1885
  
  
  
Ann Maclean
12 DEC 1773 - 16 JAN 1864
 
Allan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G.
20 MAR 1846 - 14 JUN 1901
  
 
  
John Harding , MA, Rev
5 MAY 1779 - 10 MAY 1861
 
 
Caroline Emily Harding
22 OCT 1812 - 12 JAN 1901
  
  
  
Anna Maria Willoughby
1 SEP 1776 - 18 NOV 1857
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) Allan Maclean Skinner , Q.C.
Birth14 JUL 18099 Cadogan Place, Chelsea, London, christened there 22 August 1809 (Parish of St Luke)
Death23 MAY 1885 Reading, Berkshire
Marriage20 DEC 1837to Caroline Emily Harding at Nolton Chapel, Bridgend, Glamorganshire
FatherJohn Major Skinner , Lieut General
MotherAnn Maclean
PARENT (F) Caroline Emily Harding
Birth22 OCT 1812Rockfield, Monmouthshire, christened at Dunraven Castle December 1814
Death12 JAN 1901 Abbotsham, Devonshire.
Marriage20 DEC 1837to Allan Maclean Skinner , Q.C. at Nolton Chapel, Bridgend, Glamorganshire
FatherJohn Harding , MA, Rev
MotherAnna Maria Willoughby
CHILDREN
FEuphemia Isabella Skinner
Birth7 JUN 1847Brighton, Sussex, England (1881 Census)
Death10 SEP 1939Sunnyside, Ralph's Ride, Bracknell, Berkshire
Marriage16 AUG 1870to Holroyd Chaplin at Bickington or Newton Abbott? in South Devon, see Matilda Adriana Chaplin's diary for Tuesday 16 August 1870.
MJohn Edwin Hilary Skinner
Birth11 JAN 1839
Death20 NOV 1894at Sétif, Algeria, where he was buried
Marriage30 APR 1864to Louisa Sarah Chaplin at Christ Church, Marylebone, London
FCaroline Rachel Skinner
Birth14 JUL 1840
Death
FAnna Cordelia Skinner
Birth14 JUL 1840
Death
Marriage13 AUG 1863to Parkes Willy , Rev
FFlorance Marion Skinner
Birth13 AUG 1842
Death12 APR 1918Florence
Marriage4 JUN 1863to Walter Holden Steward at Tixall, Staffordshire. The marriage certificate giving details can be obtained through the index in book 1a page 134 of
FKatherine Louisa Skinner
Birth17 OCT 1843
Death1920
Marriage16 NOV 1876to Ashley George Westby
FMaud Elizabeth Skinner
Birth25 OCT 1844Brighton, Sussex
Death24 JUN 1904
Marriage20 DEC 1871to Allan Chaplin , Col at Bridgend, Glamorgan
MAllan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G.
Birth20 MAR 1846Brighton
Death14 JUN 1901Canterbury
Marriage23 SEP 1875to Ellen Shelford at St. Saviour's, Clapham
MClifton Newman Curtis
Birth1835Brighton
Death
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Allan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G.
Birth20 MAR 1846Brighton
Death14 JUN 1901 Canterbury
Marriage23 SEP 1875to Ellen Shelford at St. Saviour's, Clapham
FatherAllan Maclean Skinner , Q.C.
MotherCaroline Emily Harding
PARENT (F) Ellen Shelford
Birth
Death
Marriage23 SEP 1875to Allan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G. at St. Saviour's, Clapham
FatherWilliam Heard Shelford , Rev
Mother?
CHILDREN
MJohn Harding Skinner
Birth16 SEP 1876
Death
FCaroline Emily Skinner
Birth8 SEP 1877
Death
Marriage3 JUN 1907to Robert James Edmund Boggis , Rev at St Paul's Church, Canterbury
MClifton Maclean Skinner
Birth19 FEB 1879
Death20 NOV 1918
MAllan Leonard Dorney Skinner
Birth2 NOV 1880
Death1961Eastbourne
Marriageto Ina
FEllen Florance Skinner
Birth13 JUL 1884
Death
Marriage22 APR 1914to William Gilbert Cobbett , Rev
MWilliam Shelford Skinner
Birth19 DEC 1886
Death
Marriageto ?
FMildred Skinner
Birth10 SEP 1890
Death
Evidence
[S16298] Calendar of wills 1858-1943
[S6627] 'A Few Memorials of the Right Rev. Robert Skinner, D.D., Bishop of Worcester, 1663.....'
[S13901] Matilda Adriana Chaplin's diary, 1875
Descendancy Chart
Allan Maclean Skinner , C.M.G. b: 20 MAR 1846 d: 14 JUN 1901
John Harding Skinner b: 16 SEP 1876
Caroline Emily Skinner b: 8 SEP 1877
Alan T Boggis b: 18 NOV 1912 d: 1973
Clifton Maclean Skinner b: 19 FEB 1879 d: 20 NOV 1918
Allan Leonard Dorney Skinner b: 2 NOV 1880 d: 1961
Ina
Ellen Florance Skinner b: 13 JUL 1884
William Shelford Skinner b: 19 DEC 1886
?
Mildred Skinner b: 10 SEP 1890