Daphne Grace Chaplin

Daphne Grace Chaplin

b: 6 SEP 1884
d: 16 FEB 1964
Information from Christine Gould:

She had a lot of freedom as a child, was allowed to keep guinea pigs in a hutch in front of the house - in a road off Church Street, near Kensington Gardens. The family went to church in Church Street - she was strongly anti-catholic. Her mother was very friendly with Mrs Franklin, who was Jewish, and this was a bone of contention between her mother and her father, who considered Daphne was spending too much time with people who would not marry her. She seems to have been happy as a child.

She went to Ambleside (Charlotte Mason College) and got a teacher's certificate in about 1912/14. This would enable her to act as a governess. She met Cecil Gould at the University of London, fell in love with him and went on holiday in the Ardennes with an organised group just before the war. After they got married she went on teaching and he joined the army as an officer. When on a ship he wrote to her lamenting that they had not spent more time together. He was nursed at a hospital in Alexandria (Christine taught there after it became a classy school, the Eton of the Middle East). Then he was sent back to England and returned to the Middle East (Lawrence of Arabia country), and became a victim of the Turks. All that was found was his back-pack.

She would cry when she talked about her mother or husband - she felt very affectionate towards both of them. After the war......??

At some point she bought 70 Holland Road (her parents were at 2 Holland Villas Road) and made it a childrens' home. A tall narrow house with a small yard at the back. Christine was the first girl they had and was taken there at the age of two months.

Philip Ray-Jones says:

Aunty Daph had a Reliant three-wheeler with a bed in the back, and other strange little economical vehicles. In the mid-fifties she lived in the basement of Holland Villas Rd - a dark and dingy kitchen. The rest of the enormous house was let. She would like to have taken up flying.

Effie Ray-Jones said:

"She was quite a character. She married Cecil Gould who was killed in Palestine in the first World War, went out to America, sent back grapefruit etc. She had a bicycle with an engine on the back. She died of leukaemia aged about 82."

Alan Ray-Jones remembers:

"She had a laundry van with a bed in the back and on one occasion she came in it to see us at West Coombe Farm. I remember her as cheerful and energetic, an eccentric, a person with a very independent personality, speaking in an old-fashioned way but with a very modern attitude, not hampered by convention. For the 1891 Census, see the note on her father, Holroyd Chaplin.
Hotel Monaco, Grand Canal, Venice
5th April 1903

Darlingest Mother,

Here we are, very comfortable. Phil and I were greatly in favour of Pension, instead of Garni, i.e. beds only, and at liberty to eat where we please, because Philip has no happy medium, and we knew by experience that it would mean a very irregular, not to say “feminine” style of feeding. As we stay a fortnight or so it was important.

We arrived last night at 7 p.m. It was most exciting feeling that we were in Venice, though having pictured something so very picturesque and unlike anything else in the way of dreamy unreality etc. it was just a trifle disappointing -- for instance, at the mouth of the station, are steps leading down to the Canal. At the bottom are crowds of gondolas, with crowds of "drivers", all wanting to press you into taking their assistance rather than anyone else's, and that has been the way all today; nothing but men wanting to make up your mind for you, wanting to settle your plans for you, but not to pay their own services, for you.

It is the same with the shop-owners. I suppose they are what would be called good salesmen and women. As it is they frighten you away so far that there is no chance of your being attracted by anything displayed. You cannot stop one second before a stall, or shop window, but someone is out upon you, trying to persuade you to buy something at the most expensive price for the kind. If you see something of the kind you want for one fr they will bother you with similar things at two and three frs.
The people one sees in the streets are (so far) the reverse of the acknowledged Italian type; many of them being ugly in their own way, and the preponderance quite plain in everyone's way -- you don't often see a good-looking child, poor or rich, like you do in Switzerland.

The outlook from the broad pavement bordering the Grand Canal presents a view rather like a big desolate harbour and the view down the Grand Canal itself is not particularly striking. But when you get close to, or past close underneath a fine building of which there are several (and in one of which palaces Dusé lives) then it is fine indeed, and makes one yearn to have lived 100 years ago or more, when such modern buildings and touches as now destroy some of the illusion, were not.

All the rich colours etc. that one hears so much of is probably meant only in connection with St. Marks -- which as far as I can judge yet, only having been here one day, is the only building which has colours on the outside, and therefore colours the town at all. The Piazza of St. Mark is lovely -- so large and beautifully paved in grey and ivory white stones, large slabs. All round, so that it is enclosed on three sides to all appearance -- are buildings with arches, so that you can walk along like an arcade. The pillars and sculptures on the faces of the buildings are lovely. At the end is St. Marks -- glittering with marble and mosaics. I cannot describe it architecturally -- you have probably seen heaps of representations, and I shall bring some sort of a one. At the far end, a short way from the Canal and in the Piazza are two columns, one with a statue of the Theodoric, and one of the Lion of St. Mark. The pigeons add a great deal to the beauty and grandeur of the Piazza. They are beautiful, incandescent with peacocky colours, all the same style of pigeon, and heaps of them. People feed them with maize, and they flock about. The hoardings with which they have enclosed the Campanile, and the parts its fall damaged, are of course a great pity, but not flagrantly noticeable.

Today we have spent in the Doge’s Palace, seeing the pictures -- enormous wall paintings i.e. covering large areas of wall, not very particular.

[No ending from Daphne, perhaps a page missing? On the first page a note added]:

Daphne will have told you everything. We are longing for letters from you. I wonder how Sister’s "opening" went off. Venice is lovely. Your loving child, Phil
Biography
Information from Christine Gould:

She had a lot of freedom as a child, was allowed to keep guinea pigs in a hutch in front of the house - in a road off Church Street, near Kensington Gardens. The family went to church in Church Street - she was strongly anti-catholic. Her mother was very friendly with Mrs Franklin, who was Jewish, and this was a bone of contention between her mother and her father, who considered Daphne was spending too much time with people who would not marry her. She seems to have been happy as a child.

She went to Ambleside (Charlotte Mason College) and got a teacher's certificate in about 1912/14. This would enable her to act as a governess. She met Cecil Gould at the University of London, fell in love with him and went on holiday in the Ardennes with an organised group just before the war. After they got married she went on teaching and he joined the army as an officer. When on a ship he wrote to her lamenting that they had not spent more time together. He was nursed at a hospital in Alexandria (Christine taught there after it became a classy school, the Eton of the Middle East). Then he was sent back to England and returned to the Middle East (Lawrence of Arabia country), and became a victim of the Turks. All that was found was his back-pack.

She would cry when she talked about her mother or husband - she felt very affectionate towards both of them. After the war......??

At some point she bought 70 Holland Road (her parents were at 2 Holland Villas Road) and made it a childrens' home. A tall narrow house with a small yard at the back. Christine was the first girl they had and was taken there at the age of two months.

Philip Ray-Jones says:

Aunty Daph had a Reliant three-wheeler with a bed in the back, and other strange little economical vehicles. In the mid-fifties she lived in the basement of Holland Villas Rd - a dark and dingy kitchen. The rest of the enormous house was let. She would like to have taken up flying.

Effie Ray-Jones said:

"She was quite a character. She married Cecil Gould who was killed in Palestine in the first World War, went out to America, sent back grapefruit etc. She had a bicycle with an engine on the back. She died of leukaemia aged about 82."

Alan Ray-Jones remembers:

"She had a laundry van with a bed in the back and on one occasion she came in it to see us at West Coombe Farm. I remember her as cheerful and energetic, an eccentric, a person with a very independent personality, speaking in an old-fashioned way but with a very modern attitude, not hampered by convention. For the 1891 Census, see the note on her father, Holroyd Chaplin. Hotel Monaco, Grand Canal, Venice
5th April 1903

Darlingest Mother,

Here we are, very comfortable. Phil and I were greatly in favour of Pension, instead of Garni, i.e. beds only, and at liberty to eat where we please, because Philip has no happy medium, and we knew by experience that it would mean a very irregular, not to say “feminine” style of feeding. As we stay a fortnight or so it was important.

We arrived last night at 7 p.m. It was most exciting feeling that we were in Venice, though having pictured something so very picturesque and unlike anything else in the way of dreamy unreality etc. it was just a trifle disappointing -- for instance, at the mouth of the station, are steps leading down to the Canal. At the bottom are crowds of gondolas, with crowds of "drivers", all wanting to press you into taking their assistance rather than anyone else's, and that has been the way all today; nothing but men wanting to make up your mind for you, wanting to settle your plans for you, but not to pay their own services, for you.

It is the same with the shop-owners. I suppose they are what would be called good salesmen and women. As it is they frighten you away so far that there is no chance of your being attracted by anything displayed. You cannot stop one second before a stall, or shop window, but someone is out upon you, trying to persuade you to buy something at the most expensive price for the kind. If you see something of the kind you want for one fr they will bother you with similar things at two and three frs.
The people one sees in the streets are (so far) the reverse of the acknowledged Italian type; many of them being ugly in their own way, and the preponderance quite plain in everyone's way -- you don't often see a good-looking child, poor or rich, like you do in Switzerland.

The outlook from the broad pavement bordering the Grand Canal presents a view rather like a big desolate harbour and the view down the Grand Canal itself is not particularly striking. But when you get close to, or past close underneath a fine building of which there are several (and in one of which palaces Dusé lives) then it is fine indeed, and makes one yearn to have lived 100 years ago or more, when such modern buildings and touches as now destroy some of the illusion, were not.

All the rich colours etc. that one hears so much of is probably meant only in connection with St. Marks -- which as far as I can judge yet, only having been here one day, is the only building which has colours on the outside, and therefore colours the town at all. The Piazza of St. Mark is lovely -- so large and beautifully paved in grey and ivory white stones, large slabs. All round, so that it is enclosed on three sides to all appearance -- are buildings with arches, so that you can walk along like an arcade. The pillars and sculptures on the faces of the buildings are lovely. At the end is St. Marks -- glittering with marble and mosaics. I cannot describe it architecturally -- you have probably seen heaps of representations, and I shall bring some sort of a one. At the far end, a short way from the Canal and in the Piazza are two columns, one with a statue of the Theodoric, and one of the Lion of St. Mark. The pigeons add a great deal to the beauty and grandeur of the Piazza. They are beautiful, incandescent with peacocky colours, all the same style of pigeon, and heaps of them. People feed them with maize, and they flock about. The hoardings with which they have enclosed the Campanile, and the parts its fall damaged, are of course a great pity, but not flagrantly noticeable.

Today we have spent in the Doge’s Palace, seeing the pictures -- enormous wall paintings i.e. covering large areas of wall, not very particular.

[No ending from Daphne, perhaps a page missing? On the first page a note added]:

Daphne will have told you everything. We are longing for letters from you. I wonder how Sister’s "opening" went off. Venice is lovely. Your loving child, Phil
Facts
  • 6 SEP 1884 - Birth - ; Broadstairs, Kent
  • 2 APR 1911 - Census - ; Scale How Training College, County Westmorland
  • 16 FEB 1964 - Death -
Ancestors
   
John Clarke Chaplin
25 AUG 1806 - 2 JUN 1856
 
 
Holroyd Chaplin
17 MAR 1840 - 23 DEC 1917
  
  
  
Matilda Adriana Ayrton
1 JUN 1813 - 26 JAN 1899
 
Daphne Grace Chaplin
6 SEP 1884 - 16 FEB 1964
  
 
  
Allan Maclean Skinner , Q.C.
14 JUL 1809 - 23 MAY 1885
 
 
Euphemia Isabella Skinner
7 JUN 1847 - 10 SEP 1939
  
  
  
Caroline Emily Harding
22 OCT 1812 - 12 JAN 1901
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) Holroyd Chaplin
Birth17 MAR 1840Edgbaston, Warwickshire, England (1881 Census) on St Patrick's Day
Death23 DEC 1917 72 Edith Road, West Kensington, Middlesex
Marriage16 AUG 1870to Euphemia Isabella Skinner at Bickington or Newton Abbott? in South Devon, see Matilda Adriana Chaplin's diary for Tuesday 16 August 1870.
FatherJohn Clarke Chaplin
MotherMatilda Adriana Ayrton
PARENT (F) Euphemia Isabella Skinner
Birth7 JUN 1847Brighton, Sussex, England (1881 Census)
Death10 SEP 1939 Sunnyside, Ralph's Ride, Bracknell, Berkshire
Marriage16 AUG 1870to Holroyd Chaplin at Bickington or Newton Abbott? in South Devon, see Matilda Adriana Chaplin's diary for Tuesday 16 August 1870.
FatherAllan Maclean Skinner , Q.C.
MotherCaroline Emily Harding
CHILDREN
FIrene Kate Chaplin
Birth1 MAR 1873Westbourne Park Villas, Paddington, London, England
Death22 JUN 1962Hampstead, London, England
Marriage16 APR 1898to John William Ernest Pearce at St. Annes? (corner of Church St & Kensington High St.)
MAllan Nugent Chaplin
Birth8 JUN 1871London, Middlesex, England (1881 Census)
Death1917London
Marriage27 NOV 1897to Mildred Hall
FMatilda Effie Chaplin
Birth20 JUN 1874Kensington, London (probably)
Death20 DEC 1874Kensington, London (probably)
FPhyllis Chaplin
Birth7 JUN 1879Kensington, London (1881 Census)
Death27 JUL 1924
Marriage24 JUN 1901to Philip Herbert Cowell
MTheodoric Chaplin
Birth14 FEB 1881Kensington, London (1881 Census)
Death29 OCT 1906Kingston near Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, by falling off a cliff.
FDaphne Grace Chaplin
Birth6 SEP 1884Broadstairs, Kent
Death16 FEB 1964
Marriageto Daphne Grace Chaplin
Marriage13 APR 1916to Cecil Arbuthnot Gould at St Barnabas Church, Kensington, London - witnesses E I Chaplin and Holroyd Chaplin - to get marriage certificate see ind
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (F) Daphne Grace Chaplin
Birth6 SEP 1884Broadstairs, Kent
Death16 FEB 1964
Marriageto Daphne Grace Chaplin
Marriage13 APR 1916to Cecil Arbuthnot Gould at St Barnabas Church, Kensington, London - witnesses E I Chaplin and Holroyd Chaplin - to get marriage certificate see ind
FatherHolroyd Chaplin
MotherEuphemia Isabella Skinner
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Cecil Arbuthnot Gould
Birth1883
Death1917 Gaza, Palestine - killed in action
Marriage13 APR 1916to Daphne Grace Chaplin at St Barnabas Church, Kensington, London - witnesses E I Chaplin and Holroyd Chaplin - to get marriage certificate see ind
FatherCecil Arbuthnot Gould , Sr
MotherAlice Emily Joyce
PARENT (F) Daphne Grace Chaplin
Birth6 SEP 1884Broadstairs, Kent
Death16 FEB 1964
Marriageto Daphne Grace Chaplin
Marriage13 APR 1916to Cecil Arbuthnot Gould at St Barnabas Church, Kensington, London - witnesses E I Chaplin and Holroyd Chaplin - to get marriage certificate see ind
FatherHolroyd Chaplin
MotherEuphemia Isabella Skinner
CHILDREN
Evidence
[S37939] 1891 Census
Descendancy Chart
Daphne Grace Chaplin b: 6 SEP 1884 d: 16 FEB 1964
Daphne Grace Chaplin b: 6 SEP 1884 d: 16 FEB 1964
Cecil Arbuthnot Gould b: 1883 d: 1917