Matilda Adriana Ayrton

Matilda Adriana Ayrton

b: 1 JUN 1813
d: 26 JAN 1899
98 Palace Gardens Terrace
Kensington, Middlesex
(London)
England
1861 Census:

Source: RG9/1908 Regn district: Stafford - Castle Church Folio 20 Page 1
Brocton Villa, Brocton, Staffordshire

Allan Maclean Skinner Head Mar 51 Judge of the Staffordshire County Court Born Middlesex, Chelsea
Caroline E Skinner Wife Mar 48 A Queen Counsel's Wife Born Monmouthshre, Rockfield
John E H Skinner Son Unm 22 Student of Lincoln's Inn Born Middlesex, Hannah Sq (Hanover Sq?)
Anna C Skinner Daughter Unm 20 Spinster Born Middlesex, Hendon
Florence M Skinner Daughter Unm 18 Spinster Born Sussex, Brighton
Katherine L Skinner Daughter Unm 17 Spinster Born Sussex, Hurst
Maud E Skinner Daughter Unm 16 Scholar Born Sussex, Brighton
Euphemia S Skinner Daughter Unm 13 Scholar Born Sussex, Brighton
Matilda A Chaplin Visitor Widow 47 Fundholder and Share Holder Born Middlesex, Chelsea
Clifton N Curtis Visitor Unm 27 Living on an allowance Born Sussex, Brighton
Isabella Gregory Servant Unm 22 Lady's Maid Born Somerset, Weston in Gordano
Mary A Gregory Servant Unm 24 Parlour Maid Born Somerset, Weston in Gordano
Judith Connell Servant Unm 33 Cook Born Isle of Man, Ballaugh
Emma Hawkins Servant Unm 26 House Maid Born Staffordshire, Castle Church
Thomas Bradley Servant Unm 26 Groom Born Staffordshire, Warslow
Marie N Pollert Governess Unm 22 Governess Born Russia, Riga (not British Subject)

1871 Census:

I couldn't find her - could she have been abroad? Check the date of the census and her diary for 1871.

1881 Census:

Again no results!

1891 Census:

Source: RG12/19 - Regn district: Kensington - Kensington Town - Folio 127 page 1. Parish of St George, Campden Hill
98 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington, London

Matilda A Chaplin Head Widow 77 Living on her own means
Martha Dickson Serv Mar 45 Cook housekeeper, domestic servant
James Dickson Serv Mar 46 Butler
Ada Gorham Serv Single 22 Housemaid


From the memoir of Mrs. Matilda Adriana Chaplin. 1899 (fifty copies only printed):

The Memoir of the early years of my late mother, Matilda Adriana Chaplin, was written by her during the last twelve years of her life, and will be interesting to members of the family.

Holroyd Chaplin, May 1899.

MEMOIR

"Any memoir of myself will not instruct or edify; but it may amuse those I love and leave, to think and talk of me in the few odd minutes which the pressure of life may spare them."

"My earliest recollections amuse me; yet I canot tell why one fondly passes in review little trivial scenes of childhood. Why should I care to remember how when I was between three and four years old, I walked one Sunday with my brother Frederick in front of our father and mother, from church, carrying proudly my mother's big prayer book, and for the first time observing attentively the beautiful view from Richmond Hill?" [See Word file for the whole of her memoir, and much more]

Of her marriage she wrote:

"My grandfather's one idea was that I should, in a worldly sense, "marry well" He was very fond of me and I of him, so after my mother's death, when I asserted my determination to marry John Chaplin, my grandfather firmly opposed me, though he did not interfere with my intimacy with the family. He would not allow him to visit me. He (John) would not stand this insult, and finally I was obliged to leave my grandfather's and board with a lady, Edward C. advancing any money I wanted till I was 21."

She died aged eighty-five on the 26th January 1899 at 98 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington, London, where she had lived for many years. She had six children and 16 grandchildren, of whom two daughters and two grandchildren died before she did.

Several extracts from the Memoir have been used as notes in the records of the people they concern. For the full text of the Memoir, which is very entertaining and interesting see [c:\alan\family\m_ayrton]

END

From Calendar of wills at FRC:

CHAPLIN, Matilda Adriana of 98 Palace Gardens Terrace Kensington Middlesex widow died 26 January 1899. Probate London 24 February to Holroyd Chaplin esquire and the reverend Ayrton Chaplin clerk. Effects £19,159 16s 3d.
Matilda Adriana Ayrton

Matilda Adriana Ayrton was one of the children and the only daughter of Frederick Ayrton and his wife Juliana Nugent, and was born in Chelsea, London, in 1813.

She became my great great grandmother, and unlike most people in the story she wrote her memoirs and left them for her children. They provide a very interesting description of her life and times, and since she wrote them after she married you will find them in her folder at ‘John Clarke Chaplin & Matilda Adriana (nee Ayrton)’.

She married John Clarke Chaplin, a solicitor, in 1835 despite her grandfather’s objections. She wrote: "My grandfather's one idea was that I should, in a worldly sense, "marry well" He was very fond of me and I of him, so after my mother's death, when I asserted my determination to marry John Chaplin, my grandfather firmly opposed me, though he did not interfere with my intimacy with the family. He would not allow him to visit me. He (John) would not stand this insult, and finally I was obliged to leave my grandfather's and board with a lady, Edward Chaplin advancing any money I wanted till I was 21."

That must have been a very difficult thing to do at that time, so she has my considerable admiration. She had 6 children and 20 grandchildren. I haven’t counted her great-grandchildren, who would have included my mother. She also had a very long life, and died in London in 1899, the year my mother was born, 43 years after her husband died. I’m sure that she was a formidable woman and the lynch pin of her family, just as her daughter-in-law Euphemia (Effie) Skinner, who married Matilda’s son Holroyd (my great grandfather), became the lynch pin of her family in the next generation.

Alan Ray-Jones

Letters

To Frederick in India
[Letter to Lieut. F. Ayrton, Bombay Artillery, Matoonga, East Indies (Matoonga deleted, Ahmednuggun substituted), postmarked London 22 Serp 1829, from his sister Matilda Ayrton and his mother (it is included in both their files). Almost all the letters of this period are without much punctuation and written as continuous text without line breaks. Normally I insert paragraphs where the subject changes and add sufficient punctuation to make them easily readable, but these two, both written on the same large piece of paper, have been transcribed more or less as the original, as a sample. I imagine that this custom and the custom of letters written twice over with the second text at 90 degrees to the first, where a means of saving on paper or postage]

Monday. London, September 21st, 1829

Dear Fred,

Mama has already thanked you in my name for the parasol stick you were so very kind as to send me, it is very beautiful as are also the other things. Edward came home the Saturday after the things arrived (for he comes home every fortnight now he is Captain Ayrton) - he was highly delighted with the chessmen, he spent the whole evening in packing (?). Grandmama has given him to little box for them, in which he intends making divisions that they may not scratch each other. Acton and John have not yet seen theirs, but will at Michaelmas, they come home Saturday next. I shall be very glad to see their rosy cheeks, and I wish you were here to see them too; they would not be sorry either to see you though they are too lazy to write to you, except John, who has written once or twice. We have been staying nearly a month at Potters Bar with Mrs Carpenter. We did not go out much, for we have had such wet weather. It has rained everyday but yesterday, ever since the 29th of June, on which account the boys did not enjoy their holidays so much as they would otherwise have done; their principal amusement was on the water, from Putney Bridge to Hammersmith, one day we had a water party to Richmond, the party consisted of us five, Mr and Mrs Cann, Jane Basden’s husband, Miss Smith of (?), and a Miss Dakins, a pleasant girl, who you know nothing about, and the Waterman: when we woke on the morning of the appointed day we found it terribly wet and much feared being obliged to put it off till the next day. However, about 11 it cleared up and we set off and arrived at Battersea Bridge all safe, when Mr and Mrs Cann joined as and we all started at 12. The Merchant Taylor's barge was going to Richmond, so we were accompanied all the way with their music -- very delightful it was -- but unfortunately just as we got to Hammersmith Bridge we were caught in a pelting shower, - however we sheltered under the Bridge, where we all got out bringing up our things to dry, took each glass of wine, and made ourselves perfectly happy till the shower was over, when we all packed up and went off again, - much before we had gone far Mr and Mrs C. missed his coat and waistcoat which he had forgotten to put on, but we found it: when rowing hard to get up to the Barge Mr and Mrs C. tumbled backwards twice, to the great amusement of Edward and Acton, who pride themselves on their good rowing. We arrived without another incident at Richmond where we walked about till five o'clock when we went into the (?) with (?) appetites and tucked into Lamb, Ham, Veal Pie, French rolls, salad etc. which we brought with us, as if we had tasted nothing for a week -- indeed we had had nothing since breakfast at nine o'clock.
After dinner we washed our plates and dishes for we took them with us, packed them up in their respective baskets, and set off again home, arrived at Battersea Bridge at half past nine, delighted with our experience. I wish you had been there are -- just what you would have enjoyed. The boys say that Jeffreys the boatman at Kew always asks after you. Gay doings at Court Lodge -- a Ball tonight -- they wrote to invite us without asking us to stay so we could not go, besides Captain (?) is so surly. Georgina goes to school and likes it very well; Charlotte is in a very bad state and quite foolish; Louisa’s lameness is nearly well, she walked to (?) Bridge and back. Poor John is in a very bad way -- he expects to go to the workhouse, Turner and Townhsend (?) are both trying for the Engineers, Acton intends doing the same, I hope they may succeed.
We drink your health always and often wish you were here. Have you seen Louis Basden? He has sent Grandpapa a very handsome carved Tortoise shell snuff box, for which if you see him, do not forget to thank him. Grandpapa and Grandmama are both very well indeed -- the latter trots out every day. They both send love. Mama is going to write to you and I have said all I had to say so good bye, God bless you.
Believe me dear old fellow,
Your most affectionate sister,
Matilda Ayrton

[There follows a second letter on the same sheet]:

My dearest Boy,

I see Matilda has given you a description of our water party, but if we had been as long going as she has in describing, we should have been benighted. She looks all the better for her country excursions -- Miss Carpenter is quite well, often talked of you. Is your Perspectograph useful? I am greatly disappointed - young Guy (?) called and I should have asked him a thousand questions about you. Grandmama A. wrote me he would (?). I sincerely hope my dear child you will still keep well and like the climate. The (?) will take this letter. I should be saved the long walk into the City after this time as a receiving house for ship letters is to be opened this week in (?) it will be a great convenience in every way as the post office will be kept open till seven o'clock. I hear the bell ringing of the Park Men is to be abolished they of course are not pleased with it -- the Lady East is expected every day. I hope it will bring a letter from you. The Xmas letters have been amazingly dilatory this ano it is now a month nearly since they were issued -- though they are not due till January 1st. Those who send them have? nothing to do with that but should dispatch them by the next ship (?) as late as the 8th of April came a (?) ago. I hope you have been able to see about it -- everyone is so angry who has money in India -- I hope the money you so very kindly and generously laid (?) us has has not been any inconvenience to you. Walter has never sent any of his family the value of a pin’s head except the (?) he gives John - wretched young man I cannot imagine what will become of him. His family are with his uncle at Guildford -- you will be glad Louisa has so much recovered, she danced a Quadrille party Mrs Watts gave and I suppose is at this moment dancing away. She is a fine girl and always admired greatly -- Walter according to the East India Kalender was (?) they fully expect him next year. (?) Basden has sent a picture of himself done at (?). Tell him when you see him that he should have made the artist swallow it as a small punishment for producing such a caricature as I am sure it must be. Matilda says it looks like a Methodist Preacher. (?) has a disappointed us all by giving birth to a dead child however as her life is spared we should all be thankful. She has been in imminent danger -- it would been a great shock to her husband. They are such an affectionate couple. Mrs (?) is just come from Suffolk not at all well but looking very pretty her husband Steven has got same command up the country. Mrs B is looking very well. Mrs Bowerbank called while I was from home she read your letter with such pleasure she called the very day I accompanied Mrs C to Potters Bar. Matilda was received with such delight at Mrs Smith on Sunday – they all made kind enquiries after you. Edward Chaplin is married I hear she is a very nice young woman. M has not been able to go (?) her dear Sal yet – do you recollect that was your elegant appellation for her. Mr (?) called which he never did before, while I was away. The (?) came home on Saturday – Edward will not leave this quarter to the great disappointment of Master Goode (?) ………has been sometime at Ely and has returned pretty well dis you ever hear that Pratt was thrown out of a jig coming from a Boxing Match and was (?) on the (?) the day before he came of age to his 100,000 - the young man who was with him broke both his legs and was confined 10 months. Should anyone ever ask you for a school pray think of Ealing – I hope our long letters do not tire you in the reading . If you had time to write equally long ones they would not fatigue us. I hope Mr (?)’s account of (?) has not been (?) how completely Mr (?) shuts himself up – no one ever sees him and the house looks so forlorn. Mr (?) has a very pretty house it is about ¾ of a mile from us (?) the child is grown a very nice little girl Mrs (?) still lives with them she hoped Mr (?) had got to the end of his journey. Tell me how you pass your time do not forget to mention whether you pay postage for your letters as I would always write on the sort of paper I wrote last time. God bless you (?)
Your affectionate Mother
J.A.

I have written every month since you went. The Hallets are still at (?) Charles not having sailed – do you know John H? Tuesday morn a lovely day for our Walk. M. is quite delighted at the idea of seeing the City an event that has not (?) to her above four times in her life. Grandpapa and Grandmama are so well (?) in West Lane. God bless you again and again My dear boy. Take care both of your mind and body. The Dardis’s are quite well their money matters are quite they have now about 700 (?) with them. Your ever aff’t Mother. J.A.

1833 - To cousin Victoire in Canada
64 Welbeck Street
July 31st 1833
My Dear Victoire,
We were all much surprised to receive a letter from you addressed to my poor mother, for though I have not written to you to tell you of her death, I fully imagined that you would have heard it from Dudley. It was indeed an unexpected event, for she was quite well and out walking on the 1st of March, and on the 10th she was no more. It was on the 1st (Saturday) that she caught cold, the wind being easterly; on the next day she thought her glands were swollen, and sent for Mr. Moore, our doctor. He did not think it very serious. Then on the Sunday and Monday she remained in bed. On the Tuesday she got up and laid on the sofa, and though every precaution was taken, she took fresh cold and did not again leave her bed. On the Wednesday morning, the erysipelas being in her head, she became delirious; there was then no danger, but on the Thursday Mr. Moore, not being able to subdue the fever, called in Dr. Bree; but her constitution was so weak that they could not try violent remedies, and mild ones were of no effect. On Saturday (the 9th) Dr. Warren, a very clever physician, was also called. The fever then took a different turn, called typhoid or low fever. The delirium was still very great; a very large blister was put on her back without her being at all conscious of it, and oatmeal poultices on the feet. Mr. Moore remained all night, and insisted on my going to bed as I could be of no use, and having been up since Wednesday I was much fatigued, and slept soundly till about half-past five, when Mrs. Taylor (a person who came on the Saturday to assist in nursing) woke me to tell me that poor mamma could not possibly live much longer.
I had gone to bed in the full hope that she would have been much better in the morning, therefore, my dear Victoire, judge of my feelings when on going into the sick room I saw my poor mother, who but a month since was all health and spirits, with difficulty breathing, and her face so disfigured by the erysipelas on it that you would not have recognised her. I stood by the bedside till she drew her last convulsive breath - I did not know then that 'twas the last, but her face was so convulsed by it that I could look no longer. The next moment all left the bed, and I felt myself, as it were, alone in the world. You must have felt this when poor grandmamma died. Frederick was in the room, Acton had left it some time before, as he could not bear to hear her breathe, and poor Johnny had not the heart to come in. Edward was at Cambridge, - grandpapa had written to him on the Saturday; it would have been no satisfaction to mamma if he had been at home, as there was not an interval of reason after the Wednesday - she did not even know me.
Do you remember Chrissy, who lived with grandmamma in Beaumont Street? Fortunately mamma had just hired her, which was a great comfort to me, as she can be trusted. We had a very plain walking funeral - according to her own wish - on Monday, the 18th. We are now living with grandpapa [Colonel Nugent]. Frederick is going to be married on the 13th of next month to a Miss Hicks. She is a very nice girl. He intends to live in the country till his return to India, which will be in about a year and a half. Johnny will also be going out about that time. The wedding will take place at Miss Hicks's brother's house at Whitwell, in Hertfordshire. Have you heard from Dudley that I am going to be married to a Mr. Chaplin, a solicitor? I shall most likely live near Birmingham, which I am very glad of, as I never did like London. I daresay it will be two years before that, but you shall have a piece of cake if I can get it to you. I know a lady and gent. who lived at St. John's, very probably they will return; if so you will like them very much. Mrs Sweetman was very kind indeed to poor mamma when she was ill, and used to make tapioca and sago for her; indeed there are few such women in this world - so kind and so generous. Mamma has left you £5, which you will soon receive. Do you remember Louisa Smee? She was married on the 3rd of this month to a Mr. Lodge, a clergyman, brother to that Mr. Lodge who used to live with us in David Street. I am very glad you are so happy in the other world. The boys send their love to you. Johnny returns to Addiscombe to-morrow.
I have told you all the news, so now, believe me, my dear Victoire,
Your affectionate cousin,
M. A. Ayrton.



Memoir of Mrs. Matilda Adriana Chaplin. 1899 (fifty copies only printed)

The following Memoir of the early years of my late mother, Matilda Adriana Chaplin, was written by her during the last twelve years of her life, and will be interesting to members of the family.

Mrs. M.A. Chaplin died on the 26th January, 1899, and was buried at Hildenborough, near Tonbridge, with her husband, who had predeceased her on the 2nd June, 1856.


MEMOIR.

Any memoir of myself will not instruct or edify; but it may amuse those I love and leave, to think and talk of me in the few odd minutes which the pressure of life may spare them.

My earliest recollections amuse me, yet I cannot tell why one fondly passes in review little trivial scenes of childhood. Why should I care to remember how, when I was between three and four years old, I walked one Sunday with my brother Frederick, in front of our father and mother, from church, carrying proudly my mother's big prayer book, and for the first time observing attentively the beautiful view from Richmond Hill?* As we lived close to the park, I must often have seen that view, but I only think of it on that one occasion at that period of my life - perhaps I talked of it to my brother, who was very near sighted, and so disputed what I said I saw; thus it was impressed on my mind. Twelve years afterwards, at my request, we went up the river. I wished to see if this fine view really was what I remembered it. I walked on the same path, and saw the same ever lovely view, a perfect type of cultivated English scenery - all just as I remembered it.

My father was a London lawyer of small means, with a large mind and original ideas. The reason we lived at Richmond was, that he and some friends were experimenting with Merino sheep, and he, thinking that country air was good for children, managed this business near that park. Well, I suppose it did not answer. I do not remember our house there. My brother Edward was born there in 1815; and also Acton in 1816. Then they moved to Kew. I was born at Chelsea, 1813, where my parents were then living. After their marriage on very slender means, they lived at, or close to, my father's chambers, and there my brother Frederick was born in 1811. My first “house” memory is at Kew; at the church there Acton was christened, and John was born there in 1818.

*On this 21st May 1887 just about 70 years afterwards, the grounds below this terrace walk, bought by the town from the Duke of Buccleuch, is opened with some ceremony by the Duchess Mary of Teck - the Queen being Lady of the Manor of Richmond--thus this fine view is saved from brick and mortar terraces.

I distinctly remember my happy life at Kew. Frederick and I lived very much alone in the garden, which opened into our field. We used to sit on a bank, and he, who was much in advance of me, though only fifteen months older, used to tell me stories about animals, and enlarge my mind about various things. I remember his pulling flowers to pieces to show me how different one was from another, and his making patterns with petals on my hand; paper was scarce then. I think he went to school soon, in the day time, for I was often alone in the garden. There was a boys' school next door, and I amused myself by climbing on the wall, and sitting there to watch them at play. This was a stolen pleasure; no doubt it tore and dirtied my frocks, and was making me a tomboy, which was a dreadful character in those days - not so now - then I liked to climb up an apple tree, and sit on the top of the summerhouse.

I suppose the younger ones were too young to be out alone. I remember sometimes Edward in the garden, but he would pick the flowers. He and Acton were very pretty boys, I suppose, for visitors used often to say, "I must see those beautiful boys"; on one occasion they were in bed together. The visitor admired the contrast of the fat florid boy with a head of bright gold crisp curls, and the more delicate regular featured olive-skinned child; I listened with interest, and ever after admired.

At Kew we had a cow, and each, in our little tin mugs, always had some milk drawn. The little excitements of our walks were, an old sailor with a wooden leg, who drew great, and as we thought, grand pictures of fine ships in white chalk on the wall of Kew Gardens in the lane leading to Richmond. We used to talk to this sailor, and give him our halfpenny occasionally.

Then, there was the river, and a hope of seeing the Lord Mayor's barge. On some occasion I went into it and was delighted with its grandeur and gilding; I now think it must have been a royal barge, as members of the Royal Family lived at Kew. Sometimes the servant who took us out, chatted with the soldiers, who were often about; they used to notice Edward, a forward child for his age, I now know, he must have been; he was too eager to be shy, and little trifles were given to him by the soldiers. Once a live bird was shown to us by one. “Who will have it?” said he; “I will,” said I and Freddy at once; “I will,” said Edward, “please,” and for this “please,” to him it was given. This was such a practical lesson in manners that Freddy and I agreed we would always say “please” when offered anything we wanted. The bird was squeezed to death in the child's hand ere he got home. My father used to come home on Saturdays and stay until Mondays; his presence was to me a. great pleasure, and I prevailed upon him to let me see him have his dinner; I don't think I ever had any of it, as he was extremely careful about our diet; and our health in general was governed by him - my mother thought he knew more about everything then anyone else, and obeyed him in all nursery details in perfect faith. We went out in all weathers, well protected; our feet kept dry with over shoes of leather; there were no India rubber ones in those days, coats down to our heels, ears to the boy's caps, and a veil for me.

My general impression of my mother at this time is a tall lady, dressed in white, working at childrens' clothes and telling us stories, often jumping up excitedly about some mischief a child was doing, or some noise of breakage.
Just now I was told one Saturday a lady wanted to see me; my hair was duly brushed, I went down stairs, and there sitting on the chimney piece was a. jointed doll, the first my mother or I had ever seen. It had been smartly dressed, by my grandmother Nugent in London, and my father had brought it as a novelty for me.

My next happy memory is being taken into my mother's room to see “the baby” brother, John; I was just four and a half. After a while I remember feeling very proud of having baby on my lap, I sitting on the floor alone in the room, while the nurse helped mother down stairs. One day, just about this time, my father delighted us all by letting off some fireworks. With this, and his bringing us a poodle dog, his connection with our nursery life ends, and also, I think, some of the happiness of my early childhood, as I remember the pleasant sensation of expecting him on Saturdays, when we were smartened up a little, and my mother loooked pleased. I went to a day school, kept by a lady, for a short time with Fred. Was rather rebellious, I think. My father had taught this lady a little Latin that she might teach the boys, also, I have heard, put her in the way of teaching geography.

In the winter evenings by the fire-light - candles were expensive, and lamps were not used then - my mother used to amuse us with a story. After hearing it we used to delight in acting it. Our dining table had two large flaps. The cloth touched the ground when they were down, and under this was the house or cave when the scene required it. The only dressing up was a handkerchief on my head and our socks and shoes off for a supposed beggar, or water to be crossed.

About this time, while John was an infant - l818 - I remember going with my mother and him and the others to see my great-grandmother Nugent, who lived at Knightsbridge in a pretty country house, with a garden, on which site several houses have been built in the last six or seven years, two opposite the barracks called, as that house was, “South Place.” She was a small person, and used a stick to walk with, stooping much from the hips. She was ever after my model when I acted an old woman. She occupied a room in the house of her step-grand-daughter, Mrs. Smee. My next remembrance of her is her old servant Mary, who had lived with her from a girl, coming to Kew and giving my mother the details of her last days; the expression “she went out like the snuff of a candle” took my fancy; as we used candles
and save-alls. I never saw a snuff burn out without thinking of my grandmother expiring gradually somewhat in that way. My mother was very fond of her; she lived with her, and her daughter, called Aunt Peggy, when she was sent from India. (Bombay) a little girl of six or seven, and they loved her more, I think, than her own mother, who, like many mothers in those days, did not care for a child marked by small-pox, though otherwise handsome. Not so her father and his mother and sister, who loved her much. This aunt, who died before we were born, I have heard her say, did everything for her, and spent an hour daily over her hair; which curled and was of a fine gold brown. My grandfather told me, when he came from India a few years after, he went to the school (Miss Linwood's, at Leicester, famous for needlework, then very fashionable) to see if he could recognise her, and picked her out
directly, as he was sure there could not be another child with such hair She got the small-pox about sixteen. I think it must have made her rather sad and shy, for I was told she was a lively girl who used to sing. I never heard her sing, except to send a child to sleep - she could much enjoy a joke, and was evenly cheerful and patient, too anxious after my father went to India to be lively.

But I must go back to that important family event, - which happened just after the birth of my youngest brother in 1818. He left Kew without any leave-taking, just as if he were coming from Saturday to Monday as usual. He thought it better for my mother to avoid the agony of parting. Fred had been taken to see the ship and used to talk to us about it and try to make me see its great size, to impress me as he had been impressed by its size as compared with the river boats.

This last baby was rather delicate and demanded much care. Soon after my father left a servant was taken ill with small-pox; we had all been vaccinated so there was no fear of infection. I was sent up to her one day with a cup of tea. Expecting to see her as usual. I was so horrified at her hideous bloated face, that I put down the tea on the floor, and ran shrieking downstairs, frightening my mother, who told me afterwards she thought the poor girl was dead. To this day I can see her face, and remember my sensation. One day we were all hastily moved out of the house into some very small lodgings at a shoemaker's. They said that typhus fever had come on, which was infectious. A person was hired to nurse the girl: and she was to have plenty of port wine. All this was a trying expense, when economy was so necessary. She and nurse emptied the cellar. We children enjoyed the little lodging and the shop, and watching the making and mending of shoes. I don't think we had a sitting-room; my mother was always with the baby. We had no nursery after my father left us.

In the course of time the servant got better, and went to her friends, and we returned home. Martha (the servant) called about a character. I stared much at her poor white, marked face. Then there were other troubles. The cow got wrong, the fowls got into the garden. My grandfather did not like his daughter living alone, wished her to be near him, so he took part of a house just out of Baker Street, David Street. Of course we enjoyed the move. We used in turns to spend the day with my grandparents, and there I used to enjoy seeing “company.” I remember one day sitting at dinner - a chicken bone or something was given to make us happy - with some gentlemen, when the approaching coronation of George the Fourth was being discussed. My grandfather had two tickets. My grandmother was afraid to go and persuaded him not to go; so he gave his tickets to these gentlemen. I thought thern brave to go. I heard much talk about the Queen, and whether she would get into the Abbey, and the expected riot if she did not. Of course I thought it was much as if anyone quarrelled, and wanted to get in and pushed against the door, and the party inside would not open it

The Queen was spoken of as a very wicked woman though I could never find out what wicked thing she had done. I heard her called a horrid vulgar creature, and I thought when I saw an unpleasant-looking woman, she must be like that; and I wondered why the trades-people and others hired carriages and dressed smartly, as I saw them, to go and see her at Brandenbourg House. I had a feeling that she could not be so very wicked, but I never remember saying so.

At this time (1820) occurred the Cato Street Conspiracy. Fred and I talked this over, and one day he took me to see the street* and the actual house. I felt rather uncomfortable, as I was not allowed to walk so far with him, but yet I was glad I had seen the place, as people talked about it.

My two brothers went to a day school, kept by Mr. Ray, a gentlemanly man. Edward was under five years. The master took pains with them, and they were going on well when they got ringworm. Of course we all had it. To add to my mother's trouble, it was discovered that the nurse, who was good to us, and whom we liked, as she took us in the Regent's Park, then beginning to be built, and let us get and bring home clay, with which we amused ourselves trying to make things on our own little table, drank; and one day she brought baby in, as his mother thought, very ill, having fainted dead away. The doctor said he was dead drunk. It was then surmised that he had had many a sip of gin, which accounted for his puny appearance. Then I had bad inflammation of my eyes, for which, according to the fashion of that day, leeches were constantly applied, and occasional blisters behind my ears, which, of course, weakened me.

About this time my mother's half-sister, Mrs Smee (Peggy), of whom she was very fond, caught severe cold by going to Vauxhall in thin shoes, the same night ruptured a vessel in a fit of coughing, and died in a few weeks. My mother went to see her constantly with me. I used to enjoy playing with my cousins in their nice garden at South Place, Knightsbridge, though I was sorry not to see my aunt as usual, for she was very kind to me. I saw her after she died, and did not feel repelled, only sorry she did not seem the same as usual. I had, some time before been with my mother to see an old nurse. She had just died, and was laid out with a half-penny on each eye. I observed my aunt had no half-pennies on her eyes, and was hushed. I wondered why. We made a modelof her in clay, which we thought my mother and all of them would like, and were surprised at its being thought rather profane. It must have been ludicrous, for my mother looked smilingly at it.

*The name of this street has been changed. It is either John Street or Homer Street, running north and south on the south side of the Marylebone Road, then called the New Road (to the City), near Edgware Road.

Now my brother Frederick went to school at Dr. Nicholas's at Ealing, close to the parish church. Before my father went to India he visited all the well-known schools around London, to select one for his boys. He thought Nicholas's was the most liberally conducted, and the plan of teaching thorough, and the 300 or 400 boys independent and well-mannered. At eight years old they each went to school there except John, who was too delicate to go till ten. My father, with Lord (then Mr.) Brougham and some other gentlemen, gave the first idea of proprietary schools, whence sprung University (1826) and King's Colleges (1829); schools simply at first, colleges were formed there when the University of London was founded.

I went to a school in the Marylebone Road, which I rather enjoyed. They were very kind to me, and really taught me. I was fond of a baker's daughter, who gave me the crumb of a new penny roll to make bread seals with, showed me how to make them, and told me to knead the bread with washing blue to colour them. All this was too serene to last long I got the jaundice, the result of the nice meat pies and much butter, and sitting still more than was good for me. As, to all this, I was unaccustomed, I did not again to that school. I remember hearing of the objectionable mixture of classes, but I rather liked that. I heard of things quite new to me, such as “we keep,” i.e., we sell so and so and much that interested me, for they were not ashamed of their shops and they were as well, or perhaps better, dressed than I was, in brighter colours probably.

I remember the Captain of the ship in which my father went to India called one day as he was going out again and was to report about us all to my father. My attainments were so slender that I felt rather ashamed. Edward was the clever one, he could read quite well. I was proud of that, and Freddy's arithmetic. We had some money given to us and there was much nankeen for clothes. I disliked it. It was thought genteel then - even my sunbonnet was made of it. When the jaundice was over and my hair had grown a little after the shaving constantly for three or four months, during ringworm; it was decided to send me to a boarding school, for having only boys to play with I was becoming such a “tomboy,” and was never fit to be seen, except when dressed to go to see anyone or to visit my grandmother. But even there I found a boy to play with - for the cook had a son who used to help in the house, and when grandmamma was tired of playing with me, the boy was sent for, and he made houses and pancakes with cards; we played also at thieves: I pretended to rob grandmamma and he was the constable. In those days there were no “pee!ers” as we called them formerly after Sir Robert Peel, then Mr. Peel, who organised the police.

I was pleased to be nicely dressed, especially if I had a pink sash with a white frock frilled with muslin, and bonnet trimmed with the same colour - pink. I thought a certain spotted muslin bonnet lined with pink and trimmed with lace - once the baby's cap lace probably - the prettiest thing in dress I had ever seen. Little girls then always wore low dresses and short sleeves. Tippets and long sleeves were buttoned on for walking out in summer, and trousers were worn down to their shoes.

In these days children were generally kept in the background, and often heard their elders say “they should be seen and not heard.” My grandmother Ayrton and our cousin, the orphan child of her only daughter, Matilda, married to a Mr. Cater, who held a good legal office but left no provision for his three children, came, I think, to live with us. We rebelled against her wish to make us quiet and we could not help laughing when she exclaimed, “Julia! Those children will tear your eyes out when they're older” Victoire, our cousin, stammered, and Johnny began to stammer. This determined my mother to put an end to this arrangement, but I suppose she bore with it till she heard from my father. Johnny stammered till he was ten years old, when an elocution master quite cured him of the failing. My grandmother Ayrton went to Kingston, Surrey, where we went afterwards occasionally to see her. Frederick. her much loved grandson, often stayed there and did whatever he liked. I have always heard he was very like his father. Our great-grandfather Ayrton was a clergyman and master of the grammar school at Ripon, Yorkrshire. Dr. Ayrton, the musician, was her near relative. My grandfather came to London, on a pony, to seek his fortune, which he certainly found in the law, as he lived in good style in Queen Square, but took to drinking and dissipation, and my father articled himself to his friend Mr. Chitty, a name well known. I think we rather reversed this maxim, though we liked to gratify our curiosity by seeing every individual who came, whether visitor or on any business. We preferred the latter class as they were more gracious to us. I remember a man who cleaned windows always called Fred “Sir Francis,” alluding to Sir F. Burdett, so we thought Sir Francis a sort of great man, and wanted to know about him. When a stranger came we assumed he was from papa and I felt disappointed if he was not from India. Perhaps I saw and heard more than most children of my age because I always went with my mother being the only girl and was never left alone with the boys and servants. She rarely dined at my grandfather's, and when she did took me home about my bed-time.

My father was always spoken of to us as a perfect man, who knew everything, and could do anything, even carpentering, upholstering and shoemaking, which we thought much cleverer than writing an essay or review, which he did in hours that were not filled more profitably. The children came faster than the fees, so to secure a good education for them he accepted an opening for practice in the Supreme Court Bombay. My mother lived with the greatest economy that he might the sooner have made enough money to return. We were quite aware of all this. If we wanted to have things or to incur any expense, we used to he told papa would never come back if we spent so much. She only kept up the intimacy of a very few old friends, as the family cares absorbed her time. Now and then at her father's request, she would go with her mother to make a grand visit, with her footman carrying a long gilt-headed stick behind them. Fashions could not have changed then so quickly as they do now, for her best dresses were best for a very long time. I know that the bright green parasol of her wedding trousseau was still in use. I admired the form of it, the curve of the top tapering up. I know I felt proud to use it when she ever self-denying must have walked unshaded. There was one sprigged muslin dress unstarched which she never wore; to my wish that she would wear it, and my “Why don't you wear it?” she said so sadly or seriously, “I am keeping it till papa comes back, because he liked it,” that I never again alluded to that dress, and used, when I chanced to see it, to think of the day which never came when she would wear it. Ah! little thought she then of the sad future. How her fond hopes of this almost second bridal buoyed her up. Her anxieties must have been great, because except in their love for her, and their appreciation of literature, her husband and father held widely different opinions, which both freely expressed. She loved both; and my grandfather came almost daily to see us, and managed all business matters. My father was always writing advice and directions, which may not have been quite in harmony with her father's plans for her. No doubt the former attributed any ill health to living in London, though the part in which we lived was airy; but we always walked in Regent's Park- that being all on clay was bad for us.

In 1821 I was to go to a boarding school. An old and dear friend, Mrs. Bowerbank, wife of the Vicar of Chiswick, who often came to see us, at last heard of a school where I should be well taught by some lady-like excellent people living at Chelsea - Mrs. Smith and her sisters, Miss Shurrs. I went to their house with my mother, a house, not large, still standing alone up the Fulham Road, called “Thistle Grove House” then. In 1888 when I passed it was being rebuilt. Many little shops I remembered when at school are still the same. The garden has heen built over. A doctor occupied the house lately.

I liked Mrs. Smith's face and voice. Presently I was told to go into the garden with a girl, who was sent for from the schoolroom. This pleased me. When we left, my mother said Mrs. Smith seemed a nice, kind lady, and I agreed with her. It was decided I was to go there at Michaelmas. My hair was just growing after the ringworm shaving; I wore a cap like a baby’s of that time, with pink loops between the rows of lace. I was pleased with the trousseau which was being prepared for me by my anxious mother, assisted by an elderly maiden lady, a family connection always good at need. It was decided to have six of each article of clothing, except nightgowns and caps, of which four; and eight pairs of stockings and sashes. I felt rich with six new white frocks. It was winter, and I had some winter frocks, which I don't remember because they were ugly in my eyes, probably - coloured petticoats were deemed vulgar- I had never worn any in winter under my cloth frock, only trousers of flannel with cloth or other leggings buttoned to them. 'Ihe trousseau was packed into a new trunk with M.A.A. on it in brass nails, and I was taken to school by, I forget who. I hardly realised what it would be when the novelty of school wore off; so I only felt sad at saying good-bye to the baby.

I was backward in reading, partly from frequent inflammation of my eyes. Edward used to read me the parables and miracles from the Testament, Fred some natural history and bits from Goldsmith's geography. There were very few children's books then, and they were very expensive. We amused ourselves with Don Quixote and Pennant's account of London, both of which had pictures, and my mother some French fairy tales, telling me the English as she went on. She also tried to teach me the auxiliary verbs, but I was restive over these, and as I knew crying was to be avoided on account of my eyes, perhaps showed symptoms of an impending shower.

My first trouble at school, then, was that I could not read. I made such desperate efforts to read fluentlv that I succeeded in reading fairly by Xmas.

I liked Mrs. Trimmer's History of England at first, but cared less for it when it came to the Wars of the Roses. The domestic history interested me. After this, or at the same time, I read a juvenile edition of Belzoni's Travels in Egypt, which delighted me. I could not get any of my little friends to be interested in it. I read it alone to my good governess, Mrs. Smith, with a feeling that she enjoyed it as much as I did. I think, probably, my father wished me to read travels, as my mother often said he liked reading travels, and that I must try to remember my geography lessons, as papa would be pleased if I did; and he would like me to read natural history.

We were never in communication with the servants. There were some three or four big girls, young women in fact, whose friends could not afford to pay the full terms; in consideration of this, they were to make themselves useful, so they had charge of the little ones as to their clothes, watching over their preparation of lessons, and were responsible for their well doing and obedience - two were for music practice and to teach beginners. I was very fond of the young lady who took care of me; she was so motherly and conscientious, and mended my clothes exquisitely; outgrown silk stockings (no cotton tops then) were quite lengthened by darns at the toes; I was proud of her darning. Mrs. Smith taught me geography from a large atlas; this I liked, and wondered that the three little girls who were with me did not seem to care about it.

My only trouble was that the girls quizzed any peculiarity in my dress; even my having my stockings tied up instead of gartered, and the cap which everyone admired at home, even grandpapa, was the cause of much quizzing, and I was glad when my hair had grown long enough to cast it off. I thought the cap really pretty with lace and pink satin loops between the rows of lace, so I regretted leaving it off; besides, I did not like anything that was sanctioned at home to be found fault with. I think this is usual with children. One day I heard my mother's well-remembered knock at the door. I felt so inclined to cry when I saw her that I could not speak or ask about dear Johnny; in fact, she must have thought I did not care to see her.

How glad I was when Christmas holidays came and I should have my brothers again. Frederick did not think much of my school of only 18 girls, while there were over 300 boys at his school, and they were not kept in so, and had good games. Could I spin a top? I could do nothing, but I could work neatly - well, that counted for something, and I learnt more French than he did, he admitted, but my arithmetic was very poor and so was my writing, and he thought Mrs. Smith should he spoken to about it. Well, I knew he would not have an opportunity of carrying out this idea, so I did not mind. I found that he knew nothing of the history of England, which tended to balance our acquirements a little, though I thought him very superior to myself or any bigger girl at school.

We three elder ones went to a children's party. My grandfather, who wished to see me dressed, said I looked “a hog in armour.” This rather upset me; I felt shy all the evening, but was pleased that Edward was much admired. This party was not far from our house; it was at the Ottley’s, a name well known in Art; they were also very musical. My mother, for some reason - probably the expense of a suitable dress - did not go with us, a friend took us. When we were at supper the servant came for us. I remember Edward, who was being petted by a lady, burst out crying at having to leave the gay and festive table. Just as we got outside the door we found our anxious mother waiting tor us, for she feared the servant might not get us safely home - we might meet drunken men or be run over. Her big cloak was held round me. I had got rather tired of the party, and was glad to be with her to tell her all about it.

When I went back to school I felt rather sad for a day or two. Schools in those days were not so luxuriously appointed as they are now. The schoolroom was large, without carpet, a large table in the centre, three small ones in the corners of the room, where the governesses sat on chairs; we sat on benches without backs, except when we were reading to the governess, then on chairs. We always said lessons standing, each one alone; and classes were a. repetition, or examination on old lessons. I felt more cheerful when regular work began, though I was tired of it long before the holidays came again.

I learnt music on a new system, invented by Logier. The only merit of which was, to keep the hands in proper position mechanically, keeping the learner for months on five-finger exercises; then the finger prisons were moved to another place screwed on to a bar, the length of the piano keys. I had no natural talent for music, though very fond of listening to it when the airs were simple. As I required quickness on finger, Logier's was a bad system for me. I also liked my French lessons, though Miss Shurr, who taught us, was conscientiously strict, and aimed at perfection. She had been taught by an emigrant Abbé, and had a good accent and method of teaching. I think she took extra trouble with me, and punished me for every shortcoming, so that at last I was ill with bilious attack, probably from want of joyful exercise, and our doctor, whom my mother sent to see me, took me home. I was put to bed, and was ill some time with fever, my mother watching me day and night. At this time we were daily expecting my father's return from India, and one day the servant brought up a rather large letter. “The banker” said my mother; she opened it, began to read, gave a sort of shriek, and left the room. I was in bed too weak to move. I lay wondering what it was. I had heard of people losing all their money, and thought the banker had written to say we had lost all ours, like the West Indians we knew. I was not much distressed, and began planning how we should live, which amused me. Then I heard grandpapa's step, and directly felt satisfied that he would make mamma happy. Then the servant who had gone to fetch him came to me when I asked her after mamma. She said “She can't come in because she is crying so! Your pa is dead!” I could hardly believe her, for I had daily been talking about what we should do when he came home, and wondering whether I should remember all I had learned at school if he questioned me.

The doctor (our friend) came in to see me and ordered a mixture for mamma, which I always think of now when I smell ether. Her friend-at-need, my godmother Miss Smee, came and sat up all night, and mamma without undressing, at last, I suppose, fell asleep on the bed by my side. The next day the boys came from school. Edward was overcome with grief. I remember his being exhausted with sobbing, but do not remember about his brothers. Their mourning suits having been made, they returned to school. When widow's caps were brought for my mother to try on, she put one on, then threw it down on the floor and buried her face in her hands and threw herself on the bed. I thought how I could comfort her, and said “Papa must be happier than you are because he is in Heaven”. I had reasoned thus, but this effort of mine seemed to increase her grief, so I was quiet, and Miss Smee consoled her. It did not seem strange to me then that my grandmother was not the consoler of her only daughter, but I heard years after that she never was fondly attached to her. My grandmother was a pleasant, lively little woman; my mother was more serious and earnest, like her father, and was more his companion than was her mother. She did not take the deep interest in the children that he did. She was very fond of Edward, however, and was generally kind to us.

When I had recovered and change of air was advised, my mother took me and Johnny to stay with Captain Smee and his maiden sister, my godmother, at a charming house in a park near Robertsbridge in Sussex. They were the guardians of their five nieces, whose father (John Smee, of the Indian Civil Service) married my mother's half-sister. He had taken this house to please his daughters. The two elder ones were married, but the five at Courtlodge were only a little older and younger than myself. These daughters were Mrs. Lawrence and Mrs. Watts, of Battle; Mrs. Lodge, wife of Rev. B. Lodge, no family; Mrs. Barton, married to a bad man, no family; Mrs. Reeks, married a clergyman, had a family; Mrs. Brown, married Major B., Indian Army, had three sons.

I got quite well and strong after a few weeks of open-air life. I used to sit in their schoolroom and enjoy rambling about the grounds. I was much surprised at the clergyman, who spoke like a farmer and preached in his surplice, which was coarse and looked to me more like a smock frock. I was told he was a great scholar. His wife was kind to us. I was sorry when the visit ended, but as it was then the Midsummer holidays, and the boys came home from school, I soon enjoyed myself with them. Though I can well remember the dreary effect which the family mourning had upon me; boys at that time used to wear white trousers and waistcoats, and blue jackets and caps; and girls white or light frocks with coloured sashes; so that a family all in black was more impressive than it is now.

Our cousin Victoire, my father's sister's orphan, came to visit us, and we were taken to see some sights. The most interesting was the Museum at the India House, in Leadenhall Street. Tippo Sahib's mechanical tiger, which made such a hideous noise, was our chief interest. Then there was a picture gallery, the nucleus of the National Gallery, belonging to Mr. Angerstein. I was most interested in “The Woman taken in Adultery” - the figures seemed so very real. In due time we returned to school. I felt sad as I had been away a quarter, and I missed the little excitement which no one shared with me about papa's return home. I had been taught to think that everything I learnt would interest him, and now it all seemed dull and flat. However, when the holidays came, grandpapa took much interest in us all, and the boys always kept us lively, but my mother was so anxious about us, that her nerves must have been always in a state of great tension.

Frederick wanted to be an Engineer and to go to India, this was a shock to his mother. A cadetship was obtained for him, and he went to the East India College, Addiscombe, near Croydon. He was considered clever, and passed for the Engineers, but having been engaged in some row he was degraded to the Artillery. Mathematics was his favourite pursuit.

The next summer, 1824, we passed the holidays at Dieppe. My father, l heard, wished us to see France. This was a joyous excitement for us. My grandfather was rather nervous about my mother going alone with us. We were told we must be very good and help. The journey could not be made in one day, so we slept at an inn - “The White Hart" I think was the sign - at Brighton. Frederick and Edward went out after tea to look at the town. Next morning they went out again. My mother, as the hour of the starting of our steamer drew near, was afraid the boys would not be back in time. I felt very anxious. However, at last, just in time, they arrived. I do not remember how long the sea misery lasted. It was quite dark when we arrived. We were too excited to feel tired or sleepy when we arrived at an hotel on the port. We amused ourselves with criticising and examining everything in the room; the white window curtains smelling of French soap, the large windows opening “vertically” as Fred said. Presently came the most delicious coffee we had ever tasted with boiling milk and oh! sugar at discretion. As there was no church, we read together a chapter of the Gospels every morning. Immediately after breakfast I went out with the boys to buy some fruit, as I was supposed to know more French than they did. I was told to ask a toothless old women, who sold fruit on the port, how much those cherries were. “Les cheriqes sont' tro chouges,* ma bonne demoiselle.” Well, I did not quite understand her. The boys pulled me away and had a good laugh at my French.

*Les cerises sont trois sous

I began to think I had been learning it all wrong, and was ready to cry, but when I told my mother she explained that it was bad French, just as we hear bad English spoken sometimes, and besides the poor old woman had no teeth. When we went to a shop and I could be understood, and understand, the boys thought better of my French.

On the steamer we had made friends with a family named Benjamin, three or four little girls and a pretty little boy, whom I well remember, - we always called him “little Benjamin their ruler,” as he was the pet, and now knew it was the Jewish style of the fair Italian type. The Benjamins lived in a chateau, containing many rooms en suite, all on the ground door with rather shabby silk or satin, Louis XIV furniture and common coloured prints on the walls. Once this house was occupied by the Duchesse de Berry, widow of Comte d'Artois, assassinated 1829; it was outside the walls and when we went to play there, we were obliged to get into Dieppe before eight, as the gate was shut at that hour. No one was supposed to pass without leave, but for half a franc the soldier opened it for us. The first time we were late we hoped they would not let us go through, and that we should be obliged to sleep how we could somewhere, or at the Benjamins’.

There is an old castle on one side of Dieppe used as a barrack. There were then no houses opposite the sea, but a nice expanse of grass and a small casino with promenade attached to it. Mv mother took us to Rouen for three days in the diligence. It started towards evening. We children were all put into the corner, the seat was wide, Johnny being small and thin, was to sleep behind us. However we did not sleep, but made such a. noise that the conductor reproved us. We were glad to arrive. On entering Rouen, we saw some manufactories with very many windows all so bright with lights that we thought it was a public illumination, and were eager to know the cause. The hotel was in the Rue de la Grosse Horloge. We were taken to the Cathedral, the Enfants Trou?s and other places. Frederick and Edward went about alone. I remember we used to be amused at Dieppe watching the rats in the port at low water. Then the boat-building amused us.

While I was enjoying this free and easy life with the boys, Frederick and Edward thought it a good joke to tell me one day that Mrs. Smith and Miss Shurr had just arrived, and were at the other hotel; mamma said we must call upon them. I felt that I must henceforth dress very neatly, walk very quietly, except at the Berry chateau, and generally be quite a young lady; the boys walked gravely with us, my mother and me, to the other grander hotel, then said it was only a joke, and glad I was that it was only a joke, though I liked Mrs. Smith and Miss Shurr very well in their place, i.e., Brompton Square. I felt that their being at Dieppe was rather oppressive and schooly. In due time we were to return home. A carriage was hired to drive us in two days to Boulogne. We slept at Abbeville, and there Fred, who was studying fortification, explained to us something of the works and talked about Vaubun. There was some trouble to get him away from this fortified town. We went by boat from Boulogne to London, at the Custom House near the Tower, I think, arriving in the forenoon on.a very wet day. We stood in a row on a bench under umbrellas while my mother with Frederick attended to the luggage. My grandfather's servant came to the rescue, and we then waited in the coach. At last we got home.

We all dined at my grandfather’s. I was dressed in a silk dress colour eau de nil, which I did not think very pretty, but was consoled with a pink sash to be worn with it. Eau de nil was called the fashionable colour; I bore this in mind in case my schoolfellows should find fault with it. But I did not have to wait for their disapproval. My grandmother: “What an unbecoming dress!” But worse than that, it was painfully tight in the waist. I bore it through dinner, then slipped away to find the servant to pin it in some way; in fact, the grand French dress was rather a failure. The facon, too, was to English eyes peculiar; so was my walking-out toilet, but I do not remember what it was. Then came the Christmas holidays and Christmas parties. The best party we went to was at a Mr. Ottley's on Twelfth Night. There might have been about 100 there, of various ages. I.well remember seeing Sir Thomas Lawrence as he was talking to my mother, and asked her, pointing to Edward, if she knew who that boy was. “He has a fine head.” I had always thought his head was like some statue I had seen.

These Ottleys were a West Indian family. We used to hear them pitied for having lost so much by the abolition of slavery in the West Indies, but as they lived in a nice house in the Regent's Park, kept one or two men servants (black), and about three or four females, I wondered why my grandfather called him “poor Ottley.” It was explained to me how they had formerly kept horses, carriages, and many niggers. We knew about five West Indian families, and I enjoyed spending the day at their houses. They were nice, kind people, and spoke pleasantly to their servants, though I saw Mrs. Ottley box the young nurse's ears for being very lazy, as she certainly was. I saw her often sitting on the floor enjoying her dolce par niente, looking so happy, staring at us and listening to us in a vacant way. Then there was another West India household, the females (mother and her sister) were almost black; they were not visited. There were two daughters who were not so dark; one of them sang beautifully. It was allowed to go and see them, and I very much enjoyed seeing the, to me, novel interior. The peculiar talk and accent of the mamma and aunt, their queer dresses, a sort of striped calico, loose jacket, and coloured cotton handkerchief like a turban on their heads. They gave me cakes. There was always a smell of cooking in that house. The young ladies were always well dressed. My grandmother was good-natured and noticed them, but I never met them at any other West Indian house. The other families, I believe, were quite white and highly educated. Altogether I rather preferred the West to the East Indian friends or acquaintances. They did not criticise me, and made me feel more at home with them. My grandmother approved of slavery on Biblical authority, would not believe they were ever treated cruelly, though she must have known they were as a fact. I heard of Mr. Someone, who put his slave down a well. Ottley had a fine collection of pictures. His brother wrote the History of Engraving. Our friends were remarkably musical.

My friends at school were three sisters, named Chaplin, and this Christmas they invited me to spend a few days with them. Their father was one of the clergy at Gray's Inn, and also chaplain to St. Martin's Burial Ground, Camden Town, which was then considered out of London. My brother Frederick escorted me there, and was kindly invited to dinner. I was glad of this, as, except my schoolfellows, they were all grown-up strangers.

Before dinner was over, I felt quite at home, for Mr. Chaplin and his sons, aged 22 and 32, were very friendly. Mrs. Chaplin was an invalid, but not confined to her room. I remember she took me up to bed, and I chattered to her about France, which seemed to amuse her. I think she must have told the other members of the family I had amused her. The son (Edward) did not sleep at home, as the house was too small, but John came home to dinner and to sleep. At breakfast, which was at eight o'clock, he used to talk to me till his father came in when we were obliged to be very quiet, as he read his papers, but we whispered and giggled very sotto voce. I only stayed a few days, but those few days determined my future life. At home I had been accustomed to play and talk with my brothers as one of them, to be chaffed by them; but John Chaplin treated me quite differently, tried to please me, brought me a flower, a print, or some trifle, said when I left that he should call and see me, and I looked forward to seeing him.

However at the end of the holidays I returned to school. Those ladies had removed to 28 Brompton Square, then just built, but not finished, which pleased my mother, as it was much nearer to Manchester Street, where she was then living. She used to come to see me nearly every Saturday, and stay to tea When she came I used to run down to see her, then go back to finish up anything I was preparing that I might enjoy my evening. The conversation often turned on old times as compared with the then present days, Miss L Shurr having lived as companion, and almost as the daughter, of Mr. Plummer (MP for Middlesex, I think), and his wife (one of the Hamilton family), had seen a good deal of society, and many celebrated people. My mother would tell them stories of the French migrants, and their pitiful poverty, how they might be seen when Louis 18th lived rent free in one of the houses of the Duke of Buckingham's (then Marquis), in the fields early, like crows, for they generally wore black, looking for salad, and how a certain abbess always forgot it was Friday -- when at dinner - but these migrants were welcomed by the Tories, and some went back to France with Louis, and settled there under his patronage. Someone persuaded the Marquis of Buckingham's daughter to he a Roman Catholic, and she went with the Court to France; which much grieved her father; probably she thought the religion which had priests apparently more devout than the ordinary Protestant pastor of those days, must be the most in harmony with her heaven.

1828. In the autumn of this year my brother Frederick, who was much loved for his amiable character and good temper, left the India Military College, and went to India. My mother spared no expense in his outfit. I came from school for a few days to be some comfort to my mother on his leaving. We all dined at my grandfather's on that day, and in the evening he left with Captain Dardis, who came to see him on board at Portsmouth. My poor mother was in an agony of grief - it was but ten years after she had parted with his father - and this parting must have brought vividly to her mind all those sad times. I believe Frederick did not care much for the military life; he wanted to see the East, he delighted in reading of it, and he wanted to be an engineer, but at that time this was not a recognised profession, so he would hear of nothing but India He was in the Artillery, but after a. short time always had engineering work, till he was, when superintending the fortification of Aden, attacked by Arabs, and found his near-sightedness so dangerous that he decided to leave the Army, and take to the bar.

We passed some part of the next summer holidays in London. I remember John Chaplin taking his youngest sister Sarah, me, and my brother Edward to Vauxhall Gardens. I had often heard them spoken of as charming, though then on the wane and not much frequented, but I longed to see them. I think it was rather an expensive affair with carriage hire, as there was then no other means of getting there. The Gardens, with their strings of coloured lamps, small al fresco stage, peep shows, rope dancing, small fireworks would be all very tawdry and poor now that we have a Crystal Palace, &, &. Though I did not find it so fairy-like as I expected, I enjoyed myself. There were alcoves with a glimmer of light in each, for supping in off meagre little sandwiches and ginger pop which we had. I suppose stronger drink could be had. From this time I had a sentiment for John Chaplin, which neither J nor anyone else suspected, though I heard afterwards that his mother had said he would one day marry "that little dark girl." I believe now this "sentiment" was rather the pleasure of gratifed vanity than any better feeling I certainly did not appreciate his fine qualities for some years afterwards. I knew him better than others, and liked him better, but thought men generally pleasanter than women. Being used to boys I felt more at my ease with them; and I really think the men liked this, though I was innocent of any special wish to please them or flirt, but had good spirits. It was well for me that I knew and loved this excellent young man. I was struck by his devotion to his invalid mother and his generosity to his three sisters - his pride in everyone but himself, and his admiration of all great or good men; though all these good qualities no doubt influenced me less than his preference for me. My vanity, too, was flattered. My brothers frankly quizzed me, and told me of my faults, while he saw no fault in me, his desire being to please me.

I liked his father, - a very agreeable old gentleman, who had a great store of interesting anecdotes. He remembered the Gordon Riots; he was at Westminster School, and when there heard parts of the trial of Warren Hastings; he talked with much animation of great elections at Westminster, in which he said some of the school took much interest, and boys would get out in spite of punishment to see the great election. Westminster boys used to play and hunt cockchafers on the land - then very swampy - on which the whole of Belgravia now stands. I remember this Grosvenor property being redrained and built over. I have heard that there was difficulty in making a firm foundation for the houses on this marsh. Politics seemed to me very rudely discussed then at grand tables. At Lord someone's in Norfolk, where he had a living, on someone drinking to the health of one party, a lady replied, "True blue and none of you!" He said there was some risk of highwaymen in crossing Hampstead Heath or Hadley Common late He and his father, when riding, felt glad to be safely over. Then he had tales of friends who had been in Paris during the great Revolution (1793). One of these, who could speak French, saw them going to hang someone, saying excitedly, "A la lanterne!" (the street lamp). He asked what the man had done; talked to them, and finally they did not hang the man.

Mr. C. and his sister who married a clever barrister by the name of Holroyd*, were the only children who lived to grow up. Their mother was the daughter of one Von Stocken, Librarian to the King of Saxony or Prussia, and I was told he was learned. This couple died when Mr C. was at Cambridge, where he went on a scholarship from school. He was intended for the bar, but while at Cambridge fell in love with a Miss Theodoric, who was very pretty (Mabel resembles her), and went into the Church that he might sooner marry her. She was the only child, except a sister by a former wife. On the death of Mr. Theodoric there was some quarrel about the division of property, and I knew nothing of that branch. The other daughter was a Mrs. Vale. When anything was said or done that was thought mean or unamiable it was said to be "just like Mrs. Vale." Thus I remember the name. By his marriage Mr. C. had a very large family; there were seven boys living at one time, and four girls. When I first knew them there were only three girls and two grown-up sons; the eldest, Edward, was ten years older than John, my husband, an amiable man, but was less beloved by his family than his brother.

*Afterwards Sir G.S. Holroyd, one of the Justices of the King’s Bench

He was more selfish and less generous to his sisters. For a young man he had a fine income as a solicitor; his brother had been articled to him, and worked very hard in his office.

I suppose my husband was clever in business, as he was offered a good partnership without payment by a wealthy old Birmingham lawyer, but he did not know that I thought a very small income sufficed for those who married for love and had no views of a grand match. My grandfather’s one idea was that I should, in a worldly sense, “marry well." He was very fond of me and I of him, so after my mother's death, when I asserted my determination to marry John Chaplin, my grandfather firmly opposed me, though he did not interfere with my intimacy with the family. He would not allow him to visit me. He would not stand this insult, and finally I was obliged to leave my grandfather's and board with a lady, Edward C. advancing any money I wanted till I was 21. My grandfather was passionate and would not be thwarted, in other respects he was good and generous. I was very much grieved at this quarrel; friends did all they could to repair the breach, but in vain, for a girl to resist him was an unpardonable offence. My eldest brother was engaged to a nice girl, whose father was a country doctor. My grandfather did not object to this, why then object to my marriage, I thought, and my spirit rose? I ought, perhaps, to have been patient, but J.C. was too indignant to bear this insult, and would not endure a hole-and-corner courtship. He thought I should not like to live there, as we were not positively engaged. He said he felt doubtful about accepting this good offer. There was one condition, he was to be a year with a conveyancer; at the end of that time he thought be could offer with hope of family consent. He must have known that my mother liked him, and that she knew I preferred him, I felt sure. But then my grandfather might have objected. He had all the old Tory ideas about marriage. Position and money were to be much considered in marrying me. He was very fond of me, and thought me lovely enough for anyone to fall in love with. In short, he intended to marry me well.

In this year, on March 10th, 1833, my dear, good, self-denying mother died, after a few days' illness; the first illness which I had known her to have. I think she had really worn herself out with anxiety over her children, and her respect and love for her father, with whom she often differed, yet never openly opposed him. She had much feeling, and was shy and very sensitive. My brother Edward resembled her in character and poetical temperament

But I must revert to the time of my leaving school, an event to which I and a schoolfellow, Miss Knight (daughter of the Secretary of the Bank of England), often looked forward. We planned how we should enjoy ourselves with no stricter control than that of our affectionate mothers; but when the day of leaving came I felt sorrowful, for I was really attached to those good ladies who for nearly eight years had treated me with great kindness and conscientiously instructed me and corrected me, and carefully watched over my health. When I went in to them for a last private interview, and was presented with two very handsome books I burst into tears. When Mrs. Smith joked me a little I laughed and was altogether upset. Home was very delightful after the restraint and routine of school but it was not such happiness as in my day-dream I had pictured it. My brothers were all at school, and I had no sisters. Sorrow had made my mother serious, and the future of the boys had to be considered, so I must have missed the merriment of young companions. It was decided that Edward was to leave school and read with a tutor, and live at home. This made a pleasant change as he was witty and full of life, but he soon found this tutor inefficient; another was recommended who lived in Northamptonshire.

I was invited to visit a friend of my mother’s, whom I had not seen, at Bath. I had heard and read of the Bath world, so I should like to go there. Mrs. Liddiard lived in grander style than we did; she had a nice little girl of four or five, who was always an amusement for me, but she was not much with us. Mr. Liddiard was a clergyman; they were vulgarly worldly. When I heard Mrs. Liddiard speak rudely of a valued friend of my mother, and I felt too weak to speak my sentiments, I wanted to go home, besides, it was the Christmas holidays, and I wanted to see my brothers and enjoy their fun. But in those days a young lady could not travel alone, and from Bath was about 12 hours' journey, so I must wait for an escort. Then, not without tears shed in private, I resigned myself to circumstances. I was very glad I had been to the Pump room and to a public ball at those fine rooms, and was pleased to be able to amuse my grandfather by talking about Bath. I felt on coming home as if I had got out of unwonted restraint. The friends at Bath lived in more style than we did at home. but I soon disliked it all.

During my visit there was a desperate effort made to stop the balls at the fine assembly, which the so-called Low Church Party considered to be a haunt of Satan. The Reverend Mr.Liddiard had a good living in Ireland, but lived at Bath or Cheltenham, and was for keeping up the "rooms” and, of course, subscribed. I was to be taken there. I looked forward much to going. I had read and heard of them so much. The day came; at about seven or eight o'clock, the Sedan chairs came too - they were brought one by one into the hall, the lid was lifted, the front opened, and you sat in a snug chair, were shut up in it; the men ran the poles into the iron loops and bore you away. The motion was a little unpleasant. In a little procession we arrived at the "rooms." There was, is still I suppose, a very fine vestibule. As the chairs entered several together, a person held a large plate, into which each person dropped sixpence for "tea money.” We then went into the large tea-room, where many tables of different sizes were laid for tea. Having ordered it, an urn of the now fashionable Queen Ann form was brought, but what a funny old thing I then thought it - and green and black tea in little cups, bread and butter, and sally lunn. After tea, leisurely talken, we went to the ball room. I had never been in so large a room. There were two rows, I think, of covered benches down three sides and some at the further end on a higher floor, a music gallery at the side. I was introduced to the Master of the Ceremonies, who at once brought me a partner. The room was well lighted. Then there was a pretty octagon room for those who liked quiet talk and a large card room. I was told that in former years when Bath was at its prime, there would be two thousand people at the "Rooms." Perhaps there were three hundred there on that January evening, 1829. I danced away, quadrilles and lancers, all the evening, looked well at everything, to write home about it all. At exactly 11 o'clock the M.C. held up his hand, the music stopped, off we all went. Men servants brought chairs. The next day gentlemen called, and I did not like being quizzed about the impression I had made upon them. One I remember was a foreigner - I think an Italian - who was declared ineligible.


Extracts from Letters of Mrs M.A. Chaplin:

24th July, 1841. Mrs. M. A. Chaplin writes to her brother Acton:--

I am not a theorist in education: all I desire is that children should be constantly interested and amused in a right way, a thing which servants never can do, and which better educated persons will not attempt to do, as they do not like the trouble thus entailed, for a child thus treated is, I have no doubt, a more troublesome one than another who is afraid to ask for what it wants, and feels obliged to be contented with what is given to it, who dare not reason on any point with its elders. I am sure all this mnst make the reasoning faculties very torpid, and this being next to instinct is the faculty which children should be trained to use. I dare say people might say "How that child is spoiled,” etc., but I do not mind this. I like them to be independent. and this can only be done by much trouble, combined with good manners. I think crammmg children with information of a certain kind deadens its faculties, but as all things turn up at various times they will by ten or twelve know all common things. History, grammar etc. are only fit for a maturer age. I am sure I knew but little of either till very lately in spite of all the lessons and repetitions.


27th November, 1841. Mrs. M. A. Chaplin writes to her brother Acton:--

I have a new system of teaching children to write, which is to make them write with ease like grown up persons, instead of labouring up and down as in large text, which is quite out of their power, unless the whole body is moved with every stroke, which destroys freedom. I teach in this way, making the motion of the fingers and position of the hand the important point, and beginning thus: “mmm," instead-of the straight strokes. Hitherto I have succeeded very well.



29th June, 1892. Mrs. M. A. Chaplin writes to her brother Acton :-

The children are very well. I think you and I should differ about the degree of restraint to be imposed upon children, my notion being that they should themselves impose certain restraints in order to conform to the feelings of others and the general customs of society. I think unless the child is convinced of the necessity of this it will, when the parent or schoolmaster is removed, launch out, fancying it has found pleasure in doing as it pleases without regard to the feelings of others, having in itself no standard to weigh its actions by. When a child does anything wrong I think the fault should be brought before it in all its bearings. I mean, the inducements to commit it, results likely to ensue, etc. When this is done the child will be always sorrowful and anxious not to commit the same fault again, making its interest and the parents' the same; but, when a harsher course is pursued, the child often feels perverse and angry, setting up directly an opposing interest: it certainly will not commit the same fault again from fear of punishment, but its disposition is injured.


The following letter was written in the summer of 1846 by Mrs. M. A. Chaplin to her husband:--

Dieppe, Wednesday evening.

My dearest John,
Frederick will take this letter. I must, in your own systematic style, relate the particulars of our departure from Honfleur, transit and arrival here, but the whole was so novel in its arrangements that the most elaborate details will not suffice to put the tout ensemble before your mind's eye.

I found our landlord very civil and by no means extortionate. Tuesday I paid 5 francs for taking the luggage, Francine, Allan, and Ayrton. I went on the donkey with the baby, and the rest walked. We met Mrs. Skinner's party on the quai and all went in second places as it was very stormy, Frederick having warned us that in bad weather the best place was just between the paddle-boxes: here then we all sat and were all, but Johnny (J E H Skinner) and Holroyd, and Louy, more or less sick; Mrs. Skinner fainted and was obliged to be carried out of the boat.

When the children discovered Frederick they were delighted. The omnibus which was to convey the two families here in two days for 210 francs, declined taking all the luggage. It was about one o'clock when the children were put into the omnibus, but the squabbling about luggage took up an hour. Then Frederick took it off to be weighed and finally the surplus was left lo be sent on by diligence. Then it was arranged for Frederick to come on with us. He had to get his luggage, pay his bill, get his passport. This took another hour.

Finally, about three, we started; after going a little way we remembered the luggage to follow us had no address; stop for this. Then Frederick wanted something; stop for this. At last we were fairly off in our omnibus with four horses for Yvetot, Frederick standing on the step smoking a long pipe.

[Here follows a rough sketch of the omnibus showing Frederick smoking, headed "A Faint Idea."]

This is not half ridiculous enough. We stopped at Bolbee, but I have not said a word of the provisions laid in, in baskets. Directly we started there was a call for dinner, when a huge basket was lugged upon a box. The children looked ravenous. I unwrapped a cold shoulder of mutton and proceeded to lay slices of it on bread; after this they ate bread and stewed pears, and some splendid pears, which Fred had bought.

When we had eaten our dinner, we looked about as well as the rain would allow us, till we reached Bolbee [can’t be right], where we had some coffee, and the children milk and water, the charge for which was six francs, including cider for the servants. On returning to our 'bus it was dark, so with carpet, bags, etc., beds were made for all the children; by eight o'clock they were all fast asleep in all kinds of attitudes, presenting a mass of naked feet and legs.

We reached Yvetot at half-past 10. As they had only eight spare beds, some time was consumed in arranging beds on the floor for some of the children. We breakfasted there, and our bill altogether was 38 francs, including servants. In the breakfast room there was a party of brums, [i.e., from Birmingham.] I knew them by their accent. Mrs Skinner, at a distance, did not know they were speaking English. They kept their hats on, and were very vulgar; they had some railway contract, we guessed, from their conversation. Their bustling importance and abrupt manners led me to suppose that they must be brums, when at last we discovered it by what passed.

When we had breakfasted we proceeded to Totes, the weather fine, children all alive and merry, much delighted at being taken out thro’ the windows by Frederick when we came to a hill and occasionally standing by the side of him on the step at Totes. At Totes some of the party dined, all had soup, for this we paid 8f.

We reached this place at five o'clock. The moment we stopped a crowd collected around our vehicle, the first of the kind ever seen here. Fred got out to look for beds at various places, to ask prices, etc. One person agreed to take us, but on surveying the party, declined receiving so many children, said she would not have objected to a sehool, but did not like such young ones; so at last we turned into the Hotel de Londres. By the time Fred returned to the 'bus there were a hundred people round it, Ayrton hollowing out in French, "What do you want?" "Go away!" etc, and Allan saying "Sacra Mater," being the gardener's mode of swearing. We could not resist a fit of laughing when we had all alighted and the woman would not receive us; the waiter of this hotel bearing us off in triumph. Frederick says the whole journey is so novel; crossing the desert is nothing to it. Many persons, by the way, who had never seen a 'bus were lost in amazement, and some tried in vain to count the children; while others were amused at the bonnets and hats suspended all round the interior.

When conversation flagged the two babies had a duel and Fred amused them by throwing cakes to them as they sat all together at the further end, when there was a scramble, attempts at boxing between Ayrton and Holroyd - Johnny fell off the step, but was not hurt. Ask Fred when you see him how he liked the “Graville omnibus excursion”.

I am very glad we are away from Honfleur, as one is so dependent on the tide there, so that however much one might desire to reach England one cannot start till the day after receiving a letter unless the tide is late, then perhaps detained a night in Havre; all this is a serious drawback. Steamers go from here every other day.

[See MAC_letters.doc for an additional paragraph included here]

I have just got a lodging at 50 francs a week facing the sea, and good. I like this place very much. If for a month the rooms will be 150 francs.


[Letter from Matilda Adriana Chaplin to her brother Acton, addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Bombay, East Indies and postmarked Birmingham July 7, 1848. It is annotated ‘1848 – Description of children’]


Edgbaston, June 6,1848

My dear Acton

It is a great pleasure for me to hear from you, be the letter long or short, but the last being long the pleasure was increased in proportion. I begin to answer the end first. We are as yet unsettled. This house is much too small for our family and perhaps for our position here. Edward thinks it quite disadvantageous to John to live in so mean looking a house but his clients generally do not live hereabouts (being rather in the (?) district). However here we must remain until we can get a house to suit us. It is particularly important on John's account to find one that is sufficiently well built to be proof against the sudden changes of weather, and also to have rooms with warm aspect. We do not desire anything like grounds about it, as they are expensive if kept in order, but merely a garden and drive in front. Besides ground rent is high here.

This is the only good side of Birmingham on account of educational resources. Most of the houses are small or have much ground. Not being able to find a really good governess or to continue the German Master when away I sent the children to school in the day. This has turned out very well, the lady having some very enlarged ideas of education.

Agnes studies "Blair’s essays" some papers of Addison's Spectator -- the Illiad and Moliére. You will see from this that Miss Finch has left the beaten track in the hope of cultivating the girls’ minds -- and as she says trying to give them some idea of the pleasure to be derived from a good course of reading. She teaches them to draw from nature. Agnes must send you one of her sketches. They are only there four hours daily, most things being prepared at home. Astronomy is also learnt from the heavens, that is at present they are merely learning the names of constellations. Miss Finch is a clever unaffected lady-like person with much general information. Agnes is just at an age to profit much by the system, and it is also calculated to repress her only fault, which is rather seeking approbation for all she says and does. She is a handsome looking girl.

Julia is delicate looking with a pleasant affectionate countenance, but not handsome. She is generally liked for her sweeteness of manner. Louisa is more rough than either, with large expressive eyes and is always either romping or reading intently, generally history -- or biography connected with history. Holroyd is at school at Hammersmith – he will go to public school later. He was disgusted with a school at Brighton

Now of the boys. The eldest is at school at Hammersmith, there are 110 boys, from 7 to 14. The Master, late a fellow of new College Oxford is a polished gentleman. The boys are supposed on leaving to go to public schools, which is Holroyd's final destination nothing hindering -- he likes the school and seems to enjoy himself. He was much disgusted with a school at Brighton kept by a lady to which we sent him for his health, but it did not suit him. I believe the boys were kept too tame. He is now eight years old, has much observation and power of reasoning but has not as much quickness as might be desired. He is generally intimate with older boys than himself tho’ backward in some respects in learning. But one thing pleases me -- he never reads without thinking and quickly discovers any inconsistency in facts stated or peculiarity of style. His manners are good, neither pert nor shy -- and his countenance is genteel.

His next brother is quite unlike him, delighting in all forms of society he is rather handsome -- if you ever see a picture of Bunyan, the writer of Pilgrim’s Progress, it will give you an idea of his features and countenance - when he had long hair which curled a little he looked something like Milton's portraits. He is altogether more graceful in manner and appearance than most children of his age (not six till October). The next, Allan, is a bustling very sharp child just four years old, the youngest girl is two years old -- she is said to be more like me than any of the others.

I have now given you are little sketch of the family. Of John I have not said a word -- sometimes I feel very anxious about his health. There is I fear a decided tendency to dropsy tho’ great care may avert its more serious consequences for a time. Do not allude to it in your letters as I think it bad for him to dwell upon it. If it be possible for a man to rid himself of a tendency to this evil I think he may be so fortunate, for he is very careful and his general health is very good, but I often think this place for one reason or other does not exactly suit his constitutional tendency. During an illness I had some years ago I had a goitre which you know it is a species of dropsy, it was completely (?) after an absence of four months.

We cannot conceive how Henry Holroyd could be drawn in a second time having previously lost money by speculating with his brother John, his girls are now growing up and he will want the money. Mr Spurrier is fast decaying. Six months ago we thought him likely to live seven or eight years -- he walked or rode to the office all weathers, a distance of two and a half miles -- now he is sinking rapidly, his senses are still as keen as ever.

We are going to North Wales when the childrens’ holidays begin. There is a little watering place called Rhyl where the little ones will be all the time, but we propose making a little tour to Bangor etc. with the older children.

I shall send this to Bombay where you will be probably on its arrival. You never told me the price of a Desk you bought at my request -- it was for Mr Spurrier’s daughter but she and her husband are so (?) mean that we never gave it at kept it for some more worthy person. Mr Wakeham is married again to a very nice girl. He could not endure his solitude in his fine house at Winchester any longer.

Goodbye, with our very best love believe me ever your affectionate sister,

M. A. Chaplin

I hope you will soon come home, don't stay too long in India.

[Letter from Matilda addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Solicitor, Bombay, E Indies marked ‘per mail via Marseilles’ and postmarked London 4 Jan 1840]

Edgbaston, December 1839

My dear Acton

I received your letter before the shawl etc which however had arrived in (?) Street and was forwarded by Edward last week. I wish you could have seen the un-packing. Julia and her Sister Louisa seated by the side of the box and the latter assisting with her toy knife to force up the lid, both looking most eager. Louy opened it at last for Edward had nailed it up tightly. First came the shawl for which accept my best thank. "Oh me" said Louy which was echoed by the little ones, then they were delighted to pull out the straw etc. and make as much litter as possible, the enormous jars astonished them more than the contents. Edward sent me a jar of preserve (as the Dardises do not eat them) & do of (?) pickle, the children lasted the former so when the pickle was opened Louisa thrust in her hand and then put it in her mouth. She ran about the nursery making all sorts of wry faces and trying to get rid of the taste and saying "I don't like it".

The shawl I shall put away for the present, as velvet shawls and velvet short cloaks are all the rage. It would be a pity to wear so handsome an Indian shawl just now but the moths will certainly suffer as I shall fancy each one I see is going to make his next meal off "the shawl". It is delightfully warm. I made John try it on to appreciate this. This place is much colder than London.

You appear to consider India [as] healthy as England, which I am very glad of, perhaps having a feeling against the climate may be one reason why it disagrees with some people. I judged from what I heard people say generally who have been there. Mr Henry Holroyd's wife was obliged to come home from Calcutta with the other day for a change and to bring her children who were suffering from the climate, but are now quite well and the former returned. Things of this sort certainly make one fancy it does not suit English constitutions. John was quite indignant at your attack upon the Law, however I hope your success in India will enable you to return to England at no very distant period.

I am glad to find by your letter dated 7th October that you are not likely to become an "Indian". Do you understand me? I am now in possession of the Inkstand which you gave my grandmother. It was rather singular that we had gone on for more than three years without a decent writing turn out but our house is more comfortable than when you were here - as the family increases furniture etc. is increased. This alone makes a house appear more (?). I suppose Agnes will arrive in February. We are expecting another baby (boy I hope it may be) in March. Julia talks about her cousin in India [Frederick’s daughter Agnes perhaps?] and sometimes picks out certain toys for her to play with. We expect Edward here at Xmas. I hope the time may come when we shall not be the only members of the family to meet at this season. I had hoped he would have been accompanied by his little charge [Agnes?] but of course she cannot arrive so soon tho’ I see by the papers (which you see perhaps more regularly than I do) that they have begun to tow large vessels to India by steam and expect to make a difference of 25 days.

Mottram met Graham and Morris at a client’s here the other day, a tray maker I believe. Hearings speak of Bombay etc. and the one just returned he asked if they knew you and so discovered who they were. They said they should call him but I have not seen them. Mrs Basden and the Sharpins are living near Coventry. They spent a day here. Mrs S. is still very peculiar, it is a pity she talks slang so much and dresses herself out with such a profusion of dirty jewellery, because at heart she is a very kind amiable person and with more refinement of feeling than could possibly be expected from such an exterior. Mrs Basden is looking just the same as eight or ten years ago. They said they thought the McCanns had gone to America. Mrs McC went out for a year to Ireland as a governess I suppose. Her roguish husband drove her to this. Mrs Wickham is expecting a beginning of a family in the Spring. I have not heard from her since she received the scarfe which Edward says he sent her from you. They are flourishing. Mr Wickham works hard but thinks it better to make money while he can and then be independent.

I expect by the time you return this will be a very large and important town. Railroads do so much for it, and the grammar school (450 boys) with such masters as they have must improve the rising generation. Some handsome shops are building, and the town spreads in every direction. Sarah has no family, I never saw anyone looking so young as she does, exactly the same or perhaps better than when you left, but Lucy is still a treasure. Her love has entered the new police here. By the buy, William Beckley has been removed to the Euston Square Station and is very important I suppose. This is the best appointment he could have. I can fancy John driving about, he never writes to me. Remind him that we are (?) and shall be happy to (?) of him.

I am going to write to Frederick. I have told you all and perhaps more than it will interest you to read. John as usual goes daily "to the office." Luncheon in his pocket, sometimes papers in his hand, and Spurrier is just the same as (?) is living at the Isle of (?) having entirely given up business. John (?) his love to you and John the same from myself, believe me ever your affectionate sister M. A. Chaplin

December 11th 1839

January 2nd. This letter has become rather stale but when I had finished it I found (?) before the fourth of January so I have the opportunity of wishing you a merry Xmas. We passed it pleasurable enough. Edward left us yesterday -- there is nothing new but the prospect of the inevitable (?) frost on the tenth of this month.


[Letter from Matilda addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Solicitor, Bombay, E Indies marked ‘via Falmouth’ and postmarked Birmingham July 17, 1840]

Edgbaston, July 15th 1840.

My dear Acton

An addition to the family has occurred since I wrote last, making the third. The new one is a fine little boy more like our family than either of the others. He is now four months old and not christened. His godfathers are to be Edward Chaplin, Mr Holroyd the Commissioner of Bankrupts - neither of whom can come for two or three weeks, and we cannot have him christened quite by proxy. Agnes is here and the three are very happy together. Agnes of course taking the lead. Little Edward Chaplin left us a week ago. I believe poor Agnes was required to be with him, he bullied them so severely - the others are rather too young to be bullied but he was always pushing them about and snatching away their favourite toys. He is present a most unpropressing(?) bird(?), clever, but his (?) remain very wild for tho’ he goes to school at a Miss Kells this is not the sort of cultivation which such a boy requires. He thought the being here was something between school and home, and he considers me dreadfully strict.

Sarah Motteram has just returned from her annual visit to London this year. The (?) obliges me to remain at home. Our first nurse is still with us and takes due care of their bodies while I attend to their minds (not by teaching them a, b, c etc.), assisted by a young person of respectability who comes in the afternoon, as I am most anxious to keep them as much as possible away from servants. I would never have two nurses, as I think the conversations which generally take place between them are very unfit for childrens’ ears. Agnes talks much of you, and soon discovered that John's profession was something like yours - going to the office etc. – and directly made her compare.

I saw your name in The Times some time ago, in a breach of promise of marriage case. We do not form many intimates here, though in time we may, as I think the newly married couples appear to be far more agreeable than those of the old school to whom I was introduced first of course. Where people make their money in a commercial way the generation farthest removed from the founder of any branch of trade (or rather any particular (?)) is the most agreeable, but nearly all of them have bad manners, shy and formal, with very little information on any point - particularly the females.

I am rather busy superintending jams & just now. At a future time I think I shall superintend the education of the children and procure some person in the station of a lady to superintend all the domestic arrangements and the children when company or illness may take me away. I suppose you may have heard from Edward of the death of Mrs Sharpen -- poor Mrs Basden will be left quite alone. The McCann's I believe are in America. When Sarah M. was in Town she saw Mrs (?) at the Horticultural Gardens with all the old set around her, also Mr Whiting and his step daughter. Charles Cochrane’s wife is almost a mad woman. Sarah said she was quite glad to get out of her presence. Motteram and his partner have disposed by mutual consent which John regrets tho’ I believe Motteram will have a larger income – it is not considered very honourable affairs. Mr Chaplin Sen’r is in capital health. The barristers at Gray’s Inn have presented him with a handsome silver coffee tray.

I think I have told you all news and probably some you will have heard before. With many thanks for your kindness which I cannot adequately repay - believe me my dear Acton

Ever your affectionate sister
M. A. C. Chaplin





[Letter to Acton S Ayrton Esq, Bombay, East Indies, marked ‘via Falmouth’, postmarked 1840]

November 29th 1840

My dear Acton

I almost fear I am too late for this month's mail and even if in time I suppose since the disturbances in Egypt have arisen it is rather uncertain when, if ever, this will reach you.

I have to thank you for a letter received this month and hope you continue well in spite of your confinement to the house and (?) during the rains. I learnt much more of your Indian habits from Agnes than I could from many letters. We are looking forward to seeing her with Edward during Xmas. We asked Dudley and his wife to join our fireside circle then but it appears it is a busy time with Hague and Co. I am going to ask his wife to come with Edward. I hear she is a very agreeable person, amiable etc., so I am desirous of showing her any attention.

Edward did not know the Sherbert was for me, he gave the bottle to the Dardises which was well -- the rest I have but not having yet tasted it I cannot discuss its merits. When Edward comes he will open a bottle and let you know the result. This reminds me of your former present, i.e. the shawl -- we have some piercing weather lately, but this so protected me that I only knew of it from my friends.

If I spoke to you of buying this house it was not with a view of settling in it for ever for if our means should ever admit of it we intend (?) much farther in the country. It was with a view of having it at a much lower rent - house(?) is as high here as in or near to London.We paid £75 a year for this and spent a great deal in repairing painting etc. Some of the large houses just about here let for upwards of £200 a year unfurnished and with very little land.

In your last letter you advert to my scheme to have a lady for a housekeeper. My object is to have a person with whom I could leave the children in case of my absence of or illness or otherwise. If I educate them myself they would if not so provided run wild and be with the servants, in fact I must either send them to school or have a substitute always at hand here. A person of inferior station would not do. I should treat her as a governess but there would be no degradation in doing those matters of housekeeping which I now do for myself.

I believe Mrs Harrison who lived at the Hutchinsons was the widow of a clergyman. Have you heard that Ann Chaplin is about to be married to a very agreeable young clergyman? I have as yet known him only by report. His father is much pleased with the affair, the other members of his family are all well.

I hope John is better. Tell him to write to me. I wrote by the last mail to him, my former letters are unanswered. I find Frederick is highly amused with my reports on nursery education. The children are well - since they have seen Agnes they often talk of you. Julia listens with evident astonishment to her Indian narratives. What has become of poor Captain Brown? John was in London last Sunday week and saw his name placarded about in the Sunday newspaper shops. We are quite anxious to hear the result.

The people here are not very agreeable. Now and then we meet pleasant people who generally come from some other place, and since the railroad is opened we see many friends en route to various places. We had a delightful excursion at the time of the festival here - in Derbyshire and Notts, visiting the noblemens’ and gentlemens’ seats which are very thick just there. We concluded out trip by staying ten days at Matlock, which is a very pretty place tho’ dull enough to pass the honeymoon in.

My love to John when you see him. We are looking forward to enjoy Xmas. I shall be glad when you can return to join us. Believe me my dear Acton, ever your affectionate sister

M. A. Chaplin

Our boy is quite a young Hercules. Will not be nursed but delights in moving with great rapidity and on reaching a chair immediately pulls himself up and will stand for five or six minutes. I have seen him balance on one foot to reach any thing. He is just eight months.

Ann Chaplin and her intended breakfasted one morning with Edward. She was quite delighted with his rooms, which she says are quite fit for a wife.



[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies marked ‘via Falmouth’]

November 27th 1841. Hagley Cottage, Edgbaston

My dear Acton

(?) I have allowed to all three months to pass without writing to you but the reason of this is that I defer the writing till quite the end of the month and then for get it till it is too late or something of a domestic nature of close to fill up all my time and after all this pretty you'd I have but little to say that may interest you. But the ties of relationship are so strong that it gives me pleasure to tell you any thing in respect of my children or husband. I often long for the time to arrive when you will see us but how many changes may take place ‘ere then. I fancy sometimes you would like to see me and the children.

Three in a number (and no prospect of an addition at present to that number). First to the oldest little girls are very fond of each other and patronise the baby who is (?) years younger than Louisa. He is a fine strong boy in all respects five or six months older than he is (?) 20 months he makes himself a ladder or stools and chairs to reach any thing and communities himself with turning down the large chair at; loading it and then drawing it about for a wheel-barrow. This will give you some idea of his strength when our young baby. I would not allow anyone to hold him on his legs or as they call it "set him on his feet" but left the matter to nature, his energy being enough to start him, and before the year he walked very well.

Julia is five years old at Xmas. Edward and I have a new system of teaching children to write which is to make them write with ease like grown persons instead of labouring up and down as in large (?) which is quite (?) of their power unless the whole body is moved with every stroke which destroys freedom. I teach Julia in this way making for motion of the fingers and position of the hand the important point and beginning thus: [squiggle follows] instead of the straight strokes hitherto. I have succeeded very well.

I have been expecting to hear of the arrival of Frederick and Edward in London as I (?) a letter from Edward (?) September 29 in which he said they should go around by Constantinople and then return home shortly -- since this I have heard nothing of them. Frederick is bringing us of fine (?) from Egypt. Where is John. I never hear from him which I much regret as such long continued silence must (?) eventually. If you see him ask him when he will answer my letters.

We have a hard frost which is rather unusual in this month, Your shawl therefore is on active service. John still goes to (?) and has very good health so indeed has his ‘partner’ much to the regret of his family, what a pity for a man to live in a way that renders this event. (?). They say he is worth about £200,000 and John reckons that this is probably correct. They live just as when you were here. He had a little (?) with John a short time ago because he would not consent to (?) in writing (?) feeling himself rather weaker wanted some (?) of this sort to make a (?) of fearing John have would become too popular with the clients.

I suppose business is flourishing with you. Mr Smith your school fellow who was with Blore seems to be (?). He is the architect of a proprietary school now erecting here -- this the (?) he has got picture was (?) up before competition.

I must say adieu now. I am your [ends]

[then further lines crossing over previous text at right angles]

This evening to see and hear something of animal magnetism -- it certainly (?) good thing though most people laugh at it. I think it will eventually be turned to admirable use in many ways but chiefly that surgically operations may be performed without feeling pain while the person is under its influence.

Love to John when you see him. I heard from (?) quite well and happy.

Your affectionate sister

M. Chaplin


[Letter addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Bombay, E Indies (via Falmouth)]

May 2nd, 1842

My dear Acton

Edward and Frederick have not yet made their appearance which I regret as I am in London for a few weeks with my young brood, though consisting only of three. We have lodgings spacious and airy in as terrace which you may remember, just behind Trinity Church, Regents Park, or rather new Rd -- our leaving home was rather of necessity as our cottage required painting and repairing. John likes it to look always fresh and in good order.

I amuse the children with a little sightseeing -- too much of it confuses them, but as they take a lively interest in all such things I gratify them as much as I can. They do not care for any food with an object in view of this sort - in the Coliseum today they had a bun for the Ducks and birds but did not appear to think of eating any of the cakes etc. which are sold there, in fact it is observed by everyone how little they care for "nice things," which is agreeable to me as I think it a great point when the child's mind or faculties triumphs over its sensual gratifications. One said the other day she would rather walk if she were tired because she did not to see so much when she rode. The second is considered a beauty, there are fine points in her face and a splendid juvenile brunette complexion tho’ not very dark.

Agnes is with us for a few days. I shall be glad when Edward comes home as no one here has authority to speak to (?) about little things, which should be attended to. When I went to fetch her I thought she looked untidy and neglected, though this does not go far beyond her dress yet. She seems left too much to the servants and herself when not at (?). Mrs (?) pretends not know anything about her clothes, saying "the misse does this or that etc.," when I mentioned any thing of this sort. Mrs Cater(?) is a nice person I daresay of decent family originally French, but came over in some revolution(?) and settled as Farmers here.

I went to a soirée at the Dardises, all just as when you were here, but some married, though many of these male and female were there. Frederick has sent home his luggage. I hope therefore soon to see him. Edward Chaplin Junior(?) is here playing with the children. He is a pleasing boy - at present he has a tutor all day with him at home but goes to school after Midr [mid-summer?]. Robert Hicks is practising in Old Burlington Street.

This is merely to let you know I am alive and well

Your affectionate Sister
M A Chaplin


[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies marked ‘via Falmouth’ and annotated ‘Mrs Field’s wedding, Julia’s tonsils. Year not legible or not shown in postmark, but from the reference to Acton’s forthcoming birth it must be 1842.]

Albany Street, London. July 29th [1842]

My dear Acton

Thank you for your attention to our commissions, I think I said “a desk like that you gave Edward” but you say in your letter the box, and in one of your letters the work box, -- until it comes we cannot tell where the mistake is.

We are in London upon the occasion of Ann Chaplin's wedding which took place three days ago. It was a very gay affair are, there being a family party of 40 (with very few exceptions). And Ann being popular at Camden Town and Mr Field who was once curate there also a favourite there was a tremendous crowd all in holiday attire outside the gates and even at St. Martin's Church (this Church was this morning considerably injured by lightning).

Ann’s husband is a gentlemanly man and clever, but like many young clergymen rather narrow-minded. He is economical, having already saved some hundreds out of of a small salary(?). This is fortunate, as Ann required a husband to take care of the financial department. They have taken a house in Brompton Square, just now they are at the lakes. Mr Chaplin will be so much alone that I think he must look out for another wife -- he is a much younger looking man than most of his age -- 72 or 73.

I have Julia in Town with me having brought her to have an enlargement of the tonsils cut off, the operation was performed today. It is an excellent thing, the disease caused her voice to be thick and her mouth to be always half open, and the cutting is but little pain, indeed scarcely (?) an hour after she could eat her bread and butter as usual though she had a piece taken off as large as the top of your first finger.

Mr and Mrs Wickham have a handsome carriage having no family and a large income they can have every luxury. They have a first rate housekeeper for the School, Mrs W. having her own waiting maid and living quite apart from the school, the domestic details of which are managed by Mr W. and Housekeeper. I met yesterday a Mr Turner, at Camden town, an eminent? conveyancer, who was a Buckinghamshire man and knew my grandfather and all the Aylesbury party.

John left me this evening to go to Duck pool assizes. Julia and I return home next week -- the two at home are quite well -- a fourth is expected to join the family party in October. You would have been amused to have heard Julia reason with the surgeon -- when he tried to humbug her about the instrument not being sharp -- if it were not so she it would not do for this purpose. When they said it would not hurt afterwards as it was not exposed to the air she said yes it is, every time I open my mouth. The doctors were much amused however she told them she wished to have it down and thought the instrument a very nice one, only she could not make up her mind to it. She is a peculiar child -- she will never eat anything unusual unless told it is quite wholesome. Writing and reading will amuse her alone for a long time.

Now I have begun about the children. I don't know where it will end -- Neither Edward nor Fred have arrived yet. Edward is in Switzerland on (?) and Fred I don't exactly know where. I am going to morrow to see Agnes. I am glad when Georgina is so fortunate in her marriage, give my love when you see her also to John when you see him or write.

From your affectionate sister
M. A. C. Chaplin



[Letter addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Bombay, E Indies (via Falmouth), postmarked Birmingham March 30th, 1843]

Edgbaston, March 30th

My dear Acton

Thank you for executing the commission about the Desk. We were amused at Tom Holroyd's coolly asking you to expend so much money for him - for should he not have arrived at Bombay it would have been troublesome to you. I am glad you think he may succeed in making money again. He knows very well how to spend it when he has it, and also manages very well with very limited means. I suppose just now he is quite dependent on his brothers -- a serious thing for them as they have rather large families.

John was sorry he could not get the commission about the Charter etc. (?) for you -- not being in London himself he wrote to others but could not do anything to his own satisfaction. However, Frederick has now I believe done what you required. John intended writing to you by this mail about your enquiries respecting a Clerk. He thinks that are many men who would like to go out if they had the money to start with -- then what would be the salary (and other particulars)? -- people in an inferior station think it almost next to being transported to Botany Bay. John would not be unlikely to hear of some one. He is now confined to his bed with a bad sore throat having before suffered severely from one of the same kind. I was rather alarmed but he is now improving.

We have all a kind of influenza but trust that we shall be quite well before this reaches Alexandria. The Field you mentioned behind our house is let for ever to the tenants of the Inn close by. We are fortunate not to have it built upon as this parish is five times as popular as when first we came here. Agnes is with us at present. I am sorry to find during the time she has been with Mrs Penn she has not lost any of her old faults. I think Mrs P. considered if she taught her certain lessons that she fulfilled her duty. This is but a small part as you well know of a child's education.

Mrs Feild late/Ann Chaplin expects to be confined shortly. This is a remarkable events in the Chaplin family. The others are very well. The notable Tom Spurrier is in (?) and his Father is still living in the hope that he will take kindly to the Law.

Adieu -- with John's love, believe me your affectionate on Sister

M. A. C.
The China jars you mentioned would be de trop in this cottage and besides rather too expensive.


[Letter to A S Ayrton Esqre, Bombay, E Indies stamped Five Ways and postmarked Birmingham January 29th 1844]

Hagley Cottage, January 29th

My dear Acton

I did not write by the last mail to thank you for the shawl because I heard that it had arrived and expected by this time to have seen it, but it is still passing the custom house. I will no longer delay thanking you for it.

I do not think I have written to you since our trip to Paris. It is a horrid place for Ladies to walk in. The omnibuses comes splashing past thro’ the ever flowing and litter and unless one can retreat into a shop your dress must suffer, but Parisian Ladies only walk in the Tuilleries I think, which place appears to be a sort of public nursery. There are many alterations in that city since you passed thro’ -- on our return we stayed ten days at Boulogne - saw the Grahams here. Mr G. is an eccentric gentleman, his son a young pickle is gone to Eton - all this you probably know.

We have quite a large family, five with Agnes. I was obliged to send off my french governess after three months (?) she was such a democrat and so sulkey. I have now an Irish lass by birth but she has been educated in Paris and speaks French very well with a French accent, so that the children make a tolerable progress in this. The little boy, 4 in March, understands all the commonplace talk in French, and can speak a little. It is surprising how soon children pick up a language. I shall have a German in the house when they are fluent in French. English governesses generally teach so little that I think it will be always better to have a foreigner, then it is quite certain that they are learning one language well - besides the conversation often turning on her native country enlarges their minds, and there is not that gossiping which is often the fault of governesses. Since the penny post system I hear that the young governesses are always writing letters of two or three sheets to their bosom friends, instead of attending to their pupils.

Mr and Mrs Skinner have five children. They live at Brighton. We have college of surgeons here and they want to get an act for empowering its heads to grant degrees. The sagacity of this arrangement is the great question here just now. Agnes will write you a few lines I daresay. Julia intended to have done so but is very poorly. Edward has returned to London - at last his next movements are quite unknown. Where he a member of the royal family it would puzzle newspaper editors to give the public a regular outline of his movements.

Believe me, my dear Acton
Your affectionate sister
M A Chaplin



[Badly crumpled letter to Acton in India, right edge missing in places]

Hagley Cottage, Edgbaston

June 19th

My dear Acton

I expected a letter from you by the last mail. I suppose Dudley has not heard as he generally lets me know when he has, however I have your paper addressed to Edward, as he has not yet returned home. I heard from Fred about two weeks ago from Constantinople where he was going then to leave (?) a few days for the mouth of the Danube and (?) that week he intended to reach Paris. Edward you may have heard was at Venice when we last received letters from him. We are now daily expecting his arrival unless he may think it agreeable to remain on the continent till after the long vacation when I suppose he will resume his legal life though I fancy he has scarcely begun it yet.

The children are very well. I think you and I should (?) about the degree of restraint to be imposed upon children, my notion being that they should themselves impose certain restraints in order to conform to the feelings of others and the general custom of society. I think unless the child is convinced of the necessity of this it will when the parent or schoolmaster is removed launch out fancying it has found pleasure in doing as it pleases without regard to the feelings of others, having in itself no standard to way its actions by.

When the child does anything wrong I think the fault should be brought before it -- in all its bearings. I mean the inducements to (?) results likely to ensure etc. When this is done the child will be always sorrowful and anxious not to commit the same fault again, making its interests and the parents’ the same, but when a harsher course is pursued the child often feels perverse and angry, setting up directly an opposing interest. It certainly will not commit the same fault again from fear of punishment, but it's disp(?) is injured.

I hope you are pretty well -- how is John now? Is he likely to (?) in the wars? Let us know as soon as you can about the desk which how(?) I think I asked you to send we will pay Edward for it as I believe(?) keep an account with him. I heard from Agnes a day or two ago, she seems well and happy -- adieu -- believe me your affectionate sister

M. A. Chaplin


[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies, postmarked Birmingham, August 30, 1845]

August 26, 1845. Edgbaston

My dear Acton

It is a long time since I wrote to you but you pass your time so profitably that my omission may pass unheeded. However now Frederick is in England I hear of you constantly, and a letter is only useful to keep alive family affection - though I believe on the part of John if this depends on correspondence it must have expired long ago, but I must make a last effort to rekindle it. I suppose Frederick also gave you a general idea of our movements - mine have been rather varied lately on account chiefly of Julia's health. The whooping cough proved a very dangerous affair with her and this house is not in a very healthy situation, therefore when once ill no one could well recover in it.

We are now trying to let it but perhaps as others have the same opinion of this domain as we so we shall not easily let it. We passed last winter at Boulogne and I think I shall send the children there next winter with the governess, who is a very good sort of young lady -- no nonsense or cant but with a proper integrity, always anxious to do the duty (as a business), in an unaffected cheerful manner. She is musical and takes great pains to teach Agnes Julia and Louey and I think I can trust with the children at Boulogne as John found it dull last winter alone here. Boulogne is a good place to reside in with the family. The masters are good. One from the college taught Agnes French and there is an excellent dancing academy -- three per week -- and the acquisition of French while children are young is very desirable. I could not succeed in bringing home a French misse. I think our great distance from London alarms them. By the bye, I must not close this chapter on domestic history without telling you that there are five (?) -- three male two female - the eldest boy is beginning to "come out" and shows some aptitude for figures and ‘causes’ are carefully traced by him. Where it not for this he might be thought stupid. He is to go to school when about seven. He has an accurate eye and writes well for his age -- five last March. The next, Ayrton, is very different -- quick and boisterous -- and much admired as a showey child with a large stock of impotence (?!!). "Me vont" being his favourite expression just now.

I take an interest in railroads, and have examined yours with the map. Someone thinks the rails may be deranged by a shock of earthquake. I hope this is not to happen at first or shares will be at a discount. I have been staying lately in Shropshire with some ladies who are clients of John's and some young ladies of the family amuse themselves with speculating in the (?) shares. While I was there they cleared (with a hint from John) £30 or £40 one day. A nice addition to a young lady’s pin money.

The other day when John went to London Edward was lost, however he is found at (?), a singularly out of the way corner to go into for change of air. I hope he is now going to take to the Law. He might, John says, soon make a good income if he would work.

Do you know any pleasant families at Boulogne? There is a large assemblage of Indians there now especially I fancy from your side. I did not seek any introductions to anyone there last winter as I was much occupied with the children, who all had the measles. I heard that Agnes had them in India. This must have been a mistake - or she had them twice.

Adieu, Agnes is going to write to you, and perhaps the others.

Your affectionate Sister
M. A. Chaplin


[Letter from Mde. Chaplin, chez Melle Maliot, Rue Descaliers 37, to her husband John, addressed as J. Chaplin Esq., Solicitor, Birmingham. Could be 1846.]

2nd letter. Dieppe, Wednesday evening]

My dearest John

Frederick will take this letter. I must in your own systematic style relate the particulars of our departure from Honfleur, transit and arrival here but the whole was so novel in its arrangements that the most elaborate details will not suffice to put the toute ensemble before your mind’s eye.

[For the full text of this see Chaplin, Matilda Adriana.doc (Matilda Adriana Ayrton’s Memoirs) until just before the last paragraph – the following text is in the orginal letter but not in the Memoirs]:

If we go to Folkestone I think I shall go on to Boulogne by Diligence -- we stop there. I do not think Malvern or Leamington or any of those inland places would do so well, it is certain that the best place at this time of the year is the seaside. I would always if I could (?) country for children at the fall of the leaf therefore I think it a pity to take them out of it when they can as conveniently be by the sea -- This place is cheap though just now, but if Folkestone is cheap, as Frederick seems to apprehend it is at this season, I would prefer being there, as it is unpleasant to cross in the middle of winter, and above all at Folkestone there would be a chance of seeing you, which would be impossible here - as I am sure Folkestone must be quite as good for the children as Brighton. I should like to know something of it as it is probably cheaper at any time of the year and only as far by railroad from Dover if houses are high at Folkestone. I think it would be just as well to stay here, which is certainly a much more acceptable place than Honfleur, and the children can get sea bathing and sea air.

I am sitting up to write this as tomorrow I must look for a lodging - you seem to think that a remove costs so much but suppose that in England you said one day "I will pay every penny I owe (?) all at home it would amount to a considerable sum and this is the case on leaving a place -- besides in this instance getting all our winter clothes -- by the bye we only had Pinners Phaeton once all have (?) so on being asked fairly -- and that was to go to Handsworth and (?) hill with you.

My reason for not writing sooner was that I did not resolve where to go when I heard that Brighton was so dear, for certainly I could not agree with you that it was best to go home when we might be by the sea.

I have just got the lodging Thursday morning at 50 francs the week facing the sea and good. I like this place very much if for a month the rooms will be 150 francs. I had a touch of (?) in the leg before I left Honfleur. It is well now, adieu dearest, your ever loving M.A.C. My lodging is at a girls school, a very large old house with good thick walls.



[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Solr, Bombay, E. Indies, via Falmouth, postmarked Birmingham, 1847, annotated ‘Death of Mrs Wickham’]

Edgbaston, February 20th

My dear Acton

You will perhaps already have learnt from some English newspaper the cause of this mourning paper -- the death of Mrs Wickham -- an event which I much lament for she possessed many excellent qualities and always (?) more affection for us than either of her sisters do. I believe you also preferred her.

Mr Wickham's position is very melancholy though he has the pleasant consolation of feeling that he was unwearied in his attentions to her -- and most liberal in his endeavours to save her life by seeking the best medical advice, and supplying her with whatever art could suggest to alleviate her sufferings, though there was not much acute pain; she died from disease of the heart and (?). Though to the last there was some reasonable hope of perfect recovery she was attacked sometimes by spasm of the heart and a protracted seizure finally carried her off.

At this period John was also very ill from dropsy which was induced by over excitement and late hours in business aided by cold. It appears to be of the kind that can be completely cured, for he is now engaged as usual though under promise of taking care of himself. The rest of the family are all quite well.

I suppose you hear of our moves from Edward occasionally. Frederick's letters are probably so official that we do not occupy any corner in them. We have left Hagley Cottage and are now living in a house rather nearer to the Town but it only just holds us, there is not a better to be found just now. We have this by the year, the good houses here have more grounds than we want -- the others are all about the size of ours. The domestic architecture here is at such a low ebb we sometimes think we must build.

Mr Hugh Smith has been consulted on this point. Poor Spurrier is turned out of his house to make room for the new railroad terminus, he told people to induce them to let him a house cheap, that he should be sure to remain in it, as he did not like moving (he is just 80!).

Do you read Dickens works -- how do like his last? Or present? We have german tutor for Agnes, Julia and Louy. He was master of one of the government schools in Bavaria but banished about ten years ago for some sentiment too freely expressed in the public paper. He was then Tutor in a school in England which was given up. He understands the English language well -- in addition to the elements of the sciences and is altogether superior to any governess I have met with -- he lodges near and comes daily. Holroyd goes to a proprietary school very near though he cannot remain there very long as they have a horrid provincial accident. To combat this would really be no joke.

I hope you give yourself leisure for recreation. By the bye, I like your coffee very much. We have a French nurse who also approves of the flavour and says it is "tout ce qu’il ya de mieux, frais & vert” for we roast it ourselves. The children send their love. Believe me -- your affectionate Sister
M. A. Chaplin

What do we owe you for the desk?



[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies, postmarked Malta and Alexandria]

Malta, September 14th 1847

My dear Acton

The climate here makes me fancy I am more than halfway to India. I do not know exactly the difference of latitude between England, Malta and Bombay but perhaps this is halfway between the two in climate though not in distance. John was advised to (?) in the Mediterranean and to pass some time in Italy or some southern part of Europe - it is essential to combine amusement that he may be completely (?) and return to England quite fresh. He is already much benefitted. I suppose this warm air thins the blood or at all events effects such a change in the system as to suppress and we may hope to kill his disease which a very intelligent young medical man at Brighton supposed from his general good health to be the result of a severe attack of congestion in the kidneys, than any organic disease. I regret he cannot pass a winter here however, considering his illness to have resulted from general debility. I hope the suspension from business and the warm sea air may be of permanent benefit even after a short time for our whole period of absence from England will not have exceeded seven or eight weeks.

We crossed France and embarked at Marseilles in a Neapolitan steamer for Naples. The vessel was remarkably well constructed, table good and company both French and English. Agreeable amongst others a great singer, French by birth but of the Scala at Milan who gratified us by good-naturedly singing (?) anything he was requested to sing -- a woman who could speak English also made agreeable to John -- two English barristers we stopped a day at Genoa -- another at Leghorn whence there is now a race road to Pisa in half an hour I think. The Campo Santa there must be a delightful place for a resident to spend some hours in -- we were obliged to hurry through it. The leaning tower was like looking at any picture you may see of it -- but through a magnifying glass -- the interior of the Baptistry is unique -- grand with a beautiful echo of a musical tone.

Naples is hot just now but the excursions in the country about are pleasant -- there is a railroad to Pompeii -- they have just excavated a beautiful private house which the King intends to have preserved in its present state instead of removing everything removable as in former cases to the museum at Naples. The frescoes in the rooms are very pretty and appropriate, the colours still bright. The walls divided into panels with a pretty picture forming a medallion -- but the garden or court to our English taste is puerile -- ducks carved in marble are supposed to be moving about -- small (?) gods placed at intervals, one beautiful (?) piece of sculpture of a boy taking a thorn from the foot of a satire, a little fountain in the centre and a sort of grotto at the back made of bits of various coloured marble or earth and shells inlaid in a pattern. This latter ornament seems to have been common there. The Italians and Sicilians still seem to retain much of the style of building in Pompeii. The greatest difference is in the size of the (?)

We came from Naples in a Neapolitan steamer not so well conducted as the other and very full of persons of the rank of our farmers going home to their vintage and hill (?). (?) time we thought them all second class passengers filthy in their habits and coarse in voice and manner. The more agreeable passengers were a Maltese advocate and his family who had been passing the vacation at Naples -- he has (?) his attentions here and asked us to go with him to his country house in the interior of the island, near which are some antiquities supposed to be Carthaginian or Phoenician. Everything here is connected with the grand Knights. The palace of the "Masters" is now used as the government house. There is a fine armoury there.

I am much tormented by the mosquitoes who spare John. My hands are stiff with bites. We leave this on Friday 17th for Athens. We had some idea of going to Alexandria, the trip I should much like but then you should meet us there -- from Athens we return home by Patras and Trieste. I very much enjoy these voyages as there is no unpleasant smell in these steamer as in the English steamers and except from Sicily to Malta we were close to the coast all the time with a tolerably calm sea.

Adieu from your affectionate sister

M.A. Chaplin [and, on the same paper a note from John Clarke Chaplin]

My dear Acton

When I wrote to you I fully thought I was about to return to my office; but on reaching London, and seeing Dr Hodgkin, Frederick and Edward, they all agreed I ought to prolong my relaxation from business and now we are (Malta) we are going to Greece and then return home by Venice. I enjoyed my travels but shall more enjoy being at work again provided I also have no return of my complaint.

Adieu, with best love,
Yours affectionately
J. C. Chaplin




END



[To Ayrton Chaplin from his mother Matilda Adriana in a shaky but readable hand. Probably 1893]

[Envelope addressed to Post Office, Brisbane as below]

98 Palace Gardens Terrace
February 2nd

And no tidings dearest Ayrton of you! It is worse than going to India in the old days, when everyone sent a letter from the Cape on the way east. I did not write last week, but no doubt Edith did, and will have told you that I have returned from Plymouth. Everyone says I am looking so well, that I begin to think I'm blooming, in a kind of 2nd childhood, that must be it. Well I do feel much better for the fresh air of the breezy Hoe. John and Louie were both better than when I left home.

Hilary had a bilious attack, the excess of cream even showed itself by extreme drowsiness during the journey to town; this symptom alarmed me, for I feared the incipient stage of typhoid, or scarlet fever; however it all ended in vomiting to a good night. He had not eaten since breakfast -- the next day he went to school, rather eager about his next term's work. Edith, Audrey and Henry dined here last Saturday. Henry is very well mannered and pleasant, he did not stay long, as he was going to dances at Constance's. I must go one evening to see these new or rather revised dances. I really hope Dorney is learning steadily -- he repeated perfectly to me all the Latin pronouns and 4 conjugations. Phyllis, who got a severe chill when skating, is better now, but still delicate. Her father fell ill at Wimbledon, the gentleman kindly sent him to his house a mile off to get dry clothes, and took care of Phyllis. She, being tired, sat down and then took cold -- her mucous membrane was ulcerated throughout, and her face and hands very much swelled -- she is now recovering and has a good appetite, she has been staying here for the last week.

We are longing for news of you. Julia was lunching here today. She intended to call on Edith but came on and she had no waterproof. Allan's girls are over the measles, but Dorothy is delicate still. Hilary's master much wishes him to go up for a Winchester scholarship - £100 a year at school which if obtained on leaving, is continued at Oxford. He will try in March for Harrow. Winchester exams are in June.

I intended to go to Aubrey Road today but a black fog keeps me indoors. I send you a D. N. [Daily News] You will see that Chamberlain's speech on the Queen's speech is very poor.

Goodbye dearest Ayrton
From your loving mother
M. A C.




[Envelope date stamped Brisbane March 25th 93 on arrival, addressed]:

The Revd
Ayrton Chaplin
Post Office
Brisbane
Queensland
Australia

To be called for.

98 Palace Gardens Terrace
17 February

Dearest Ayrton

I am hungry and thirsty for news of you and looking daily for it - each time that Edith comes I expect she is going to announce the receipt of a telegram from Brisbane or Glasgow. I read with interest about the floods at Brisbane -- but by the time you get there the town may be dry though the effect of having been in some parts underwater would be still very apparent. I saw Edith yesterday and thought her looking well, also on the previous day, Audrey, also well.

Home rule is the topic but the G. O. M. has dropped that title. Of course the bill will be carried in some form. I fancy the Queen is a liberal from the impressions of her early years and would listen to Gladstone's powerful and respectful tongue -- he, I see by the paper, goes to Osborne quietly. Phyllis is staying with me - till Monday, when I expect Anna Chaplin and René, for a few days (from Bournemouth). Julia was here yesterday -- she is very well -- her eyes better, but not quite strong. I expect Louie and John next month, when Louie goes with Hilary to Harrow, to try for a scholarship; he can try again next year.

We are having a very fine month. Mrs Rollings who was here a few days ago, says the gardens are in a very promising state. She enquired after you and yours. I am going today to a juvenile 5 o'Ck at Constance's as I want to see how the new dances are done - and if the Gavotte is the same as it was in my young days.

Mr Park has left Boulogne and has the living of Chertsey, near London. They were anxious to get to London as their two sons are in London. Rene is at home this term. Holloway College is very pleasant but empty for its size. What a heap of letters you will find at Brisbane! Dear Ayrton, it requires faith to write them. Phyllis is looking well, she is growing fast and requires much care and food. My trouble with her here is her walking out, if I make arrangements at 29 they are not kept and it is so important.

With such a good correspondent as your dear wife, you hear all that you want to know -- take care of yourself for the sake of all who love you amongst them.

Your loving mother



Wednesday 28th [no year, no month given]

Dearest Ayrton,

I (we) shall be much pleased to see you on Tuesday, as you can sleep in Henry's room. Audrey will be in the room over drawing-room as Louie will be at Winchester. Allan has a room near as John will be here tonight and Louie tomorrow.

The baby much delights in Henry who amused himself for two hours with him yesterday afternoon as he kept appealing to him by holding on to his knee; he can't walk yet without holding on but is very active. I heard from Cleve this mail. They are all well. I hope Edith is not exhausting, instead of recruiting, her much tried (walking) strength.

Your very affectionate Ma, MAC.

That letter card was beautifully done up and quite flat -- could not have ‘come open’.

Diary, 1870

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1870. In this year she became 57, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 14 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

There are two loose pages of titles of books or articles headed ‘Mrs Chaplin’ at the front of the 1870 diary. For example: ‘Ancient and Modern India’; ‘New England’ Dr Cotton; ‘Prose Composition’ Laurie; ‘Life of Cardinal Pole’ Hook; ‘Life of Galileo from letters’; ‘Journal of Waterloo Campaign’ by General Cavalié Mercer – 2 vols. Some titles are French. From this and from other evidence in her diaries it is apparent that Mrs Chaplin read widely and often.

January

Saturday 1

Mr Pyne, Miss James, Mary and Constance dined with us. Cleve sat by me all his tea and enjoyed himself more than anyone. John and Louie hard at work, the former came in the evening.

[John Skinner and Louisa (MAC’s daughter) had married six years earlier. Mr Pyne is Henry Pyne, MAC’s son Ayrton’s father-in-law; Miss James is Mary Anne James, the unmarried sister of Mr Pyne’s wife Harriet; Mary and Constance are daughters of Harriet and Henry Pyne. Cleve is a grandson of MAC.]

Sunday 2

At Christchurch H D preached on "wait on the Lord and he will refresh you," alluded to the progress of humanity towards goodness. L. and J. dined with us -- I called on Mrs Nelson.

[L and J – Louisa and John Skinner]

Monday 3

Packing to go to Scotland. Louie came in the afternoon. Cleve happily put himself under Julia’s wing when he knew I was going away. Left at quarter to 8. Holroyd with us to the station. A fine warm evening, which was not to have been expected after the intense cold of last week. Pleasant fellow travellers and all our wraps to soften our hard beds made the journey not so bad.

[Julia is MAC’s eldest daughter, 33 years old, who seems to live with her mother.

Tuesday 4

At daybreak at Berwick - arrived in Edinburgh at eight o'clock, drizzling rain - long waiting for a cab -- had a pleasant breakfast with Mrs Thorne and her nice intelligent children – Mattie [Matilda Charlotte Chaplin] went with her to lectures on chemistry and physiology. I ordered in food and got into our lodging at 8 Wharton Place. Pleasant windows looking upon Heriot’s hospital (a school), fine building but windows too small to give it a smiling aspect -- a school should look as bright and light as possible. I see a few boys about the grounds.

Wednesday 5

I went with Mrs T and Mattie to lectures at the college - physiology interesting, chemistry not so. In the evening, a deeply interesting lecture by Geikie on the geology of these parts. Mainly walked in the afternoon. Reading Froude’s History first volume -- this is a real history of the country, no padding. Every page desirable. Mr Pyne would write in this style judging from his book.

Thursday 6

Letter from Julia -- wrote to her. Walked with Mattie to college then strolled on looking at old books. Read. Walked to Princes Street. The irregularity of the land on which this city is built gives a charming novelty to each - now a bridge then flights of steps and quaint old buildings. After this Princes Street comes and one seems to be in another city. Shopkeepers generally civil but with an independent bearing that is agreeable. At Mrs T’s in the evening. She and Mattie out.

[8 Wharton Place was ‘our’ lodging, but Mattie seems to be with Mrs Thorne, presumably a friend providing a home from home in Edinburgh. It seems that she was studying medicine temporarily to be with Mattie, who was doing it for real.]

Friday 7

Wrote to Ayrton. Read Froude’s History - the futile (?)ory laws and Henry 8th laws against immorality, yet it is hoped to check vice by the "Contagious Diseases Bill" by simply attacking women. Went to lecture on geology – subject - action of water in changing the earth’s form. Niagara will no longer be the huge waterfall when the water has wasted the bed of shale beneath it -- it will become a great rapid.

Saturday 8

Read Froude’s History and remain convinced that had Henry 8th married a good woman he might have been to the end a great King. Went to ladies’ meeting on the Contagious Diseases Bill -- about six present. All agreed that men required reclaiming to a condition of purity and virtue. One pleasing young woman spoke against immodesty in dress.

Sunday 9

Went to a small high church -- sermon nil -- singing cheerful. Afternoon visited Mrs Robbins. Tea with Mrs Thorne.

Monday 10

Wrote to Holroyd and Mrs Skinner and John. Went to lecture on "the pulse." Saw ingenious mechanical apparatus invented by an American for testing same, is more certain than the human finger. It must assist science as there are half a dozen observations at least. Besides counting the beats it can't quite replace it. Read of the iniquities of the Church in 1529 of which the adversaries seem rather to be the people set apart if any are.

[What were the iniquities of the church in 1529? I think this was just before the English Reformation]]

Tuesday 11

Received letters from Edward and Holroyd. Wrote to Holroyd and sent letter. Went to lecture on circulation of blood. In the afternoon walked alone to Holyrood through the worst part of town. A half-crazed or tipsy woman offered me a big old muff for sale saying she had quarrelled with her husband. Too dark to see anything of the building. Evening at Mrs Thorne's -- read Froude’s History.

Wednesday 12

Letter from Julia. Went to lecture on circulation of blood which makes the whole round of the vessels and back to the heart in 25 to 30 seconds. Walked to the "Meadows" -- frost sharp. Mattie sliding all the way. Went to geological lecture by Geikie in the evening, takes 11,000 years for the rain etc to wash off one foot of earth in the (?) valley how small are (?) of time past

Thursday 13

Wrote to Allan. Went to lecture on "supply of blood to the head" -- called on Mrs Kell. Emily K in bed -- how are sadly her abilities are wasted. In the evening went to May Thorn's birthday party -- by way of forfeit hopped three times round the room saying etc “mother what a fool I am" -- much to the children’s’ amusement. A most childlike sweet party of little well brought up children -- even to the baby of 18 months.

Friday 14

Wrote to Julia -- finished the first volume of Froude’s History and despair of getting the second out of the college library. A fall of snow and thaw makes the streets in a difficult condition for passengers. In the evening at Geikie’s lecture, subject - lands once covered by water with proofs in shells and bone caves.

Saturday 15

Went to the museum with the little Thornes, examined the stuffed animals all looking rather mangy but with their skeletons beside them -- very improving. Forgot the invitation to accompany Geikie on geological excursion round Arthur's Seat.

Sunday 16

Heard a very good sermon from Doctor Alexander -- who well proved three separate visits of women to the Saviour’s tomb – observing that in trying to prove scripture by the gospels more rather than less proof was obtained.

Monday 17

Emily Robbins called. Mrs Thorne and girls dined with us in the evening. Mattie and I went to a meeting at Queen Street Hall, about 1,500 present. Good speeches by Professor Masson and and Dr Playfair on the justice of giving the franchise to women, i.e. giving them their rights. Twenty years hence it will be "old times" indeed when they had not those rights. In 50 years these will be the dark ages of women and their education.

Tuesday 18

Physiological lecture, weather warm.

Wednesday 19

Lecture in the morning -- wrote to Louie and Julia -- received letter from Louie telling me that Cleve was to go to the kindergarten. The little man asked how many there were in the school (“40”. “Shall I be head boy?”) In the evening lecture on geology. Went to dressmaker, explored Vennel and grass market.

Thursday 20

Wrote to Ayrton and Mrs McCann. Explored grass market West bow(?) and Cowgate, walked to Mrs Kell’s. In the evening lecture on breathing to restore drowned persons -- lay them on the face, keep warm by any means, move the chest to initiate respiration, clear mouth and nose out, lift the arms and let them drop. Persevere. In the evening at Mrs Kell’s heard of Jesse Forrest -- now Mrs Arthur Bligh, with a son at Cambridge. She, her husband and two daughters going to Australia.

Friday 21

Went to physiological lecture on the lungs, air etc. In the afternoon call on Miss Smith, a friend of Dr Drysdales who was most genial and kind. In the evening went to Mr Geikie’s last lecture -- on volcanoes chiefly. These lectures have been most interesting to the ignorant -- intelligible to all by the maps and illustrations. Wrote to Julia.

Saturday 22

Received letter from Julia. Went in the afternoon to Holyrood to meet Geikie and his disciples -- thence we about 200 went to Arthur's Seat. On the way he stopped to explain the volcanic eruptions which had formed these hills, the last being Arthur's Seat, and on the way down looked at the rock which is evidence of the glacial period in the Queen's Drive.

Sunday 23

Went to Iron Church. Good sermon -- Mr MacGregor. Wrote to Miss Martin and Holroyd

Monday 24

Letter from Louie to say that J E H S had passed his matriculation exam, also from Ayrton. Went to lecture, also to buy satin, same price as in London. Very misty. Wrote to Louie. In the evening to Mrs Thorne's.

Tuesday 25

Went to lecture. Walked along the meadow. Wrote to Frederick, reading Pouchet’s popularised science of geology.

Wednesday 26

Went to lecture. Read letter from Frederick with present -- wrote to Ayrton -- dined with Mrs Nichol, a very intelligent old lady; discussed the Contagious Diseases Act. Two young doctors came in the evening.

[The 1864 Contagious Diseases Act, required prostitutes to be given an intrusive physical examination fortnightly which led to all kinds of abuse and particularly affected poor women. The fight against it was led by Josephine Butler. In 1870 she wrote an article in the Daily News, accompanied or followed by a petition for repeal. She didn’t hesitate to use strong language, describing the examination as surgical rape, and inviting rich men to offer their own daughters to enable young men to ‘sow their wild oats,’ in effect charging them with hypocrisy and double standards. The Act was repealed in 1886. See also ‘Background.doc’ in the Letters folder]

Thursday 27

Received letter from Louie. Wrote to Julia -- sent letter to Frederick. Went to lecture on physiology. In the afternoon went with Mattie and Mrs Thorne and children to Duddingston Pool to skate. I walked on pondering on Scott and J E H. S’s resemblance to him, saw the cottage near the Lodge called Jenny Deans’s -- frost not very severe -- nor many skaters. Many pretty robust looking girls. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening, read Pouchet.

Friday 28

Received letter from Julia. Went to lecture on action of nerves. In the afternoon went to Duddingston Lock with Mattie and the Thornes. The frost increased in intensity and very fine, sun setting pink on the ice. Walked home alone, enjoying the great beauty of the hill outlines and rugged landscape. The rocks are familiar faces to me now -- a walk in view of them is like a visit to a friend. Wrote to Mme Celli and Ann.

Saturday 29

No letters. Read the sad history of prostitution -- the proposed extension of diseases act or any diseases act seems to me like patching up a cure without going to the root of the evil, see Dr Aston's regulations at Aldershot where the sin is recognised and sanctioned by authority and is the trade of the beer houses as much as the sale of liquor. Wrote to Louie. Walked to the other side of the town. Asked my way of the most courteous old lady I ever met par hazard, walked and talked with me.

Sunday 30

Went to Iron Church. Walked to Mrs Kell's. Tea with Mrs Thorne. Letters from Edith, Louie and Holroyd.

[Louisa and Holroyd her children, Edith her daughter-in-law.]

Monday 31

Went to lecture on bile -- in the afternoon to national picture gallery, very interesting collection and admirably useful for students. In the evening at Mrs Thorne's.

February

Tuesday 1

Letter from Louie and Julia. Wrote to them and to Holroyd. Went again to picture gallery, to find interiors of St. Peter’s and Basilica of St. Paul by Pannini – a head of David Martin by himself, must be an ancestor of Charles Martin, so like the family.

Wednesday 2

Lecture on kidneys and their function. Miss McClaren a nice sensible girl called Lea, at Mrs Thorne's

Thursday 3

Letter from Louie. Wrote to Edith with two photos. Saw a magnificent sunset -National Gallery and Scott’s monument in foreground then the castle - lower part sea mist and the sun a large ball of fire, sky lurid red and stormy dark clouds. Went in the evening with Mrs Thorne and Mattie to McLarens - the old McC has a very grand head -- charming daughters. All the lady students there, Miss Peachey graceful, nice head.

Friday 4

Letter from Holroyd. Wrote to Julia. Lecture interesting, on hair and skin. Called on Emily Robbins. In the evening at Mrs Thorne's -- read Froude while she and Mattie worked at chemistry.

Saturday 5

Worked in the morning. Afternoon walked on the south side of Arthur's Seat, saw a fine rainbow against the grass slope as we entered which reached across Arthur's Seat then a fainter one in the far distance - views very fine under a changing stormy sky – sunset red fire against the rocky hillside. Mattie very tired. Weather unseasonably warm. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Sunday 6

Went to Dr Alexander’s -- a good sermon -- the power given by Christ to the disciples when he left them, and to them only.

Monday 7

Letter from Edith. Called on Mrs Kell. Went to lecture. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening. Read history of Ireland in Froude. Top blown off our chimney and room full of smoke all day. Went to Mrs Kell’s to get out of it and passed the morning there. Wind very high.

Tuesday 8

Wrote to Louie. Went to lecture, began taking notes on the nerve system. Letter from Julia -- went to Mrs Kell's to get out of the smoke. Chimney pot set on. Sent Dr Ma…’s(?)'s clever little book to Ayrton, little Joe Bonomi and Maud Skinner. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening -- she went to London as witness for Dr Edmonds.

Wednesday 9

Went to lecture. Letter from Ayrton, sent parcel to B. Sq. Looked at section of tooth etc through microscope. Emecke in Paris, Rochefort and Hourens leading the mob, barricade up. Weather very cold.
[From the Encyclopedia Britannica: Victor-Henri, Marquis de Rochefort - gifted polemical journalist under the Second Empire and the Third Republic who distinguished himself, at first, as a supporter of the extreme left and later as a champion of the extreme right. Rochefort's career began in 1868 with the founding of the weekly newspaper La Lanterne, which was speedily suppressed for its outspoken opposition to Napoleon III. He was elected to the Corps Législatif by a Paris constituency in 1869. When the empire fell the following year, he became a member of the emergency government of national defense. His open support of the revolutionary Paris Commune (1871) led to his condemnation under military law.]

Thursday 10

Wrote to Edith. Lecture on brain and its functions. Snow fell. In the evening Mrs Thorne returned from London. Mattie walked alone. Emecke(?) soon quelled. Sent parcel to London, received letter from Mr Celli. Little Thornes had tea with us and seemed to enjoy ‘it’. What? The change of room I suppose.

Friday 11

Beautiful effect of snow on Herriot's hospital. Succeeded in making pretty good notes of lecture. Weather becoming warmer. Went out in the afternoon with Mattie to St. Andrews Square.

Saturday 12th

Sent Valentine to Cleve. Weather intensely cold. Snow. Letter from Julia. Mattie went to hospital.

Sunday 13

Heard a good sermon, Congregational Church. Dined with Mattie at Professor Masson's, his daughter aged 14 the most charming and dignified girl I ever saw at that age – simple, unaffected and pretty. Her dignity of perfect good manners – aristocracy etc manner all nonsense. Mr and Mrs M -- delightful people.

Monday 14

Went to lecture. Called on Mrs Kell in the afternoon. Sorry to find Emily in bed. Wrote to Julia and Holroyd. Thawing but still very cold.

Tuesday 15

Short letter from Holroyd. Wrote to Mrs Nelson. Weather damp. Called at Chalmers Hospital etc. The matron a pretty looking piquante little French woman with a fine head. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening. Reading Chamber’s Rebellion of ‘45 -- can't get Froude’s history.
[ From the Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2000:
The Jacobite rebellion
Britain's involvement in the War of the Austrian Succession, Tory and popular anger at the political deals that followed Walpole's resignation, and the infighting among the Whig elite were the background to the Jacobite rebellion of 1745-46 (the Forty-five). Since Britain was now at odds with France, the latter power was willing to sponsor an invasion on behalf of the Stuart dynasty. It hoped that such an invasion would win support from the masses and from the Tory sector of the landed class. Although a handful of Tory conspirators encouraged these hopes, the degree of their commitment is open to question. A large-scale French naval invasion of Britain in early 1744 failed in part because these men would not commit themselves to action. In July 1745 the Old Pretender's eldest son, Charles Edward Stuart (the Young Pretender), landed in Scotland without substantial French aid. In September he and some 2,500 Scottish supporters defeated a British force of the same size at the Battle of Prestonpans. In December, with an army of 5,000 men, he marched into England and got as far south as the town of Derby, some 150 miles from London.
Charles's initial success owed much to the ineptitude, the unconcern even, of Britain's rulers. One problem was that the standing army was too small, consisting of some 62,000 men. Because of Britain's involvement in the War of the Austrian Succession, the bulk of this force was in Flanders and Germany. Only 4,000 men had been left to defend Scotland, and most of them were raw recruits. Moreover, hampered by internal divisions, the administration was slow to respond. When the Young Pretender landed, the Pelhams were anxious but Carteret, now Earl of Granville, was not. Nor, at the beginning, was George II, who was actually in Hanover when his rival for the throne landed. As a result of these squabbles and misunderstandings, Parliament did not assemble until Oct. 17, 1745. Because by law only Parliament could authorize money to pay the militia (Britain's civil defense force), this delay seriously impeded early resistance to the Jacobite force. The city of Carlisle in the north of England surrendered to the rebels in November largely because its militia had received no pay from the government or from anyone else for two months.
Some historians have argued that the mass of Britain's population cared little which dynasty ruled them at this time and that the Young Pretender would have regained the kingdom for the Stuarts if only he had pressed on to London. Clearly, this thesis can never be proved one way or the other. The Jacobites, however, did not try to march on to London but retreated to Scotland. Nonetheless, it is probably significant that the Young Pretender attracted scarcely any English supporters on his march to Derby. Only in Manchester, which had a large Catholic population, did he gain recruits--some 200 men, mostly unemployed weavers. No Tory landowner or politician joined him, nor did any men of influence or wealth come out in his favour. By contrast, once the seriousness of the invasion was recognized, many individuals joined home-defense units or subscribed money against it. Between September and December 57 civilian loyal associations are known to have been founded in 38 different counties. Merchants and traders in the prosperous towns--Liverpool, Norwich, Exeter, Bristol, and most of all London--were particularly prominent in loyalist activity.
Although many Britons had become disillusioned by events after Walpole's fall, probably few were seriously tempted by the prospect of a Jacobite restoration. The Young Pretender, a Roman Catholic, was viewed as the pawn of France, Britain's enemy and prime commercial and imperial competitor. Traditionally the Catholic religion and French politics were associated with absolutist government, religious persecution, and assaults on liberty. These prejudices worked against the Young Pretender's appeal, as did prejudices against the Scottish Highlanders, the bulk of his armed supporters, who were regarded as terrifying barbarians by many of the English. The lack of mass English support for the Stuarts in 1745 dissuaded the French government from sending substantial military aid to the rebels. On April 16, 1746, the Duke of Cumberland (George II's second son) defeated the Jacobite army at Culloden in northern Scotland. This was the last major land battle to occur in Great Britain. The Young Pretender escaped to France and finally died in 1788, sodden with drink and disillusionment.
The main result of the Forty-five was the British government's decision to integrate Scotland, and particularly the Scottish Highlands, more fully into the rest of the kingdom.]

Wednesday 16

Received letters from Louie, Holroyd, Maud and Mr Bonomi. Weather mild and wet but we walked to Mrs Calverley’s, saw some beautiful amateur miniature painting. Went to a stationer’s - a great difference between the tradesmen's manners on this and the other side of town. Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 17

No letters. Went to lecture. Walked to Stockbridge to see Louie's friend Miss (?). She was at dinner. Wrote to Allan.

Friday 18

Letters from Holroyd and Julia. Went to lecture, very interesting - on nerves. Worked. Walked to Mrs Masson's. Took tea with her. Wrote to Holroyd and Julia. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Saturday 19

Received letter from Ayrton, examined brain of sheep with Mattie, Mrs Thorne and another. Evidence of the wonderful perfection of creation. Walked in the afternoon to the Calton Hill. Edinburgh surpasses Athens I think in all its peculiar beauties. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Sunday 20

Went to hear Dr (?) but he did not preach very good sermon, on Christ washing disciples’ feet. Weather cold.

Monday 21

Went to lecture. Letter from Ayrton. Weather very cold. Mr Hughes clergyman called, also Mrs McNab. Mattie went to the poorhouse and to Mrs Stewart's, in the evening reported that piquante little French woman as charming as usual.

Tuesday 22

Letter from Holroyd. Went to lecture, then to Stephen Oliphant’s school in Charlotte Square. 100 children being instructed, girls and boys together in 4 classes -- each class one master except the smallest where two Governesses were teaching them to read. Teachers and children lovely, rooms large and airy -- terms about £6 per ann. Weather dry and fine, went to lunch at Miss Smiths, wrote to Ayrton and Julia.

Wednesday 23

Wrote to Julia. Received letter from her -- went to lecture -- did not go out in the afternoon, the weather so wet.

Thursday 24

Letter from Louie. Heavy fall of snow, four or five inches deep. Did not go to lecture or out except to Mrs Thorne's. Answered Louie's letter, read Chambers History of the rebellion of ‘45.

Friday 25

Letter from Julia -- wrote to her. Did not go to lecture. Deep snow. Went out, Mattie went to see Mrs Kell. Wrote to Holroyd. The college youths amused themselves with snowballing for which some were taken by the police -- ladies not pelted.

Saturday 26

Letter from Louie. Snow deeper I am told that it has been for some years. Lads amused us by snowballing just opposite our windows. They did not annoy elderly men or females. Went out for short walk.

Sunday 27

Did not go out all day. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Monday 28

No letters. Wrote to Edward, Mr Saltwell, Mr Celli. Went to lecture. Afternoon, walked beyond the High School to enjoy a fine view. A wonderfully rapid thaw. Six inches deep of snow nearly thawed in 24 hours. The papers say 10in North of Edinburgh -- none in England.

March

Tuesday 1

Letters from Julia and Louie telling me of Cleve's illness. Wrote to Julia. Went to lecture on inflammation. In the afternoon to Mrs Kell, had tea there. Called on Miss McLaren. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Wednesday 2

Letter from Julie. They think Cleve has whooping cough. Called on Mr Ellis’s niece Mrs McNab very pleasant and genial, saw some good photos by White of Glasgow. At Mrs Thorne in the evening. Miss Olapperton came in. Weather very fine.

Thursday 3

Letters from Julia, Louie and Holroyd. I wrote to the two first. Went to see the workings of Mr McLachlan’s school of 180 children. Very good teaching of all kinds. Miss Smith called – read Sir A Grant’s "Recess Studies". At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Friday 4

Letters from Louie and Julia. Went to see working of normal school, 800 under instruction, some training, some learning -- a fine play ground and in it a tree said to be planted by Mary 2 of Scotts when the diocese was the residence of the Regent Murray. Wrote to Julia.

Saturday 5

Letter from Julia. Walked into Princes Street in the afternoon -- very full of pedestrians as it was very fine. Scarcely any carriages. Tea at Mrs Thorne’s.

Sunday 6

Went to Dr Alexander’s -- called on Mrs Kell. Emily looked unhealthy. Wrote to Julia and Agnes

Monday 7

Went to lecture. Walked with Mattie in the afternoon to Princes Street. Weather unusually fine. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Tuesday 8

Received letters from Julia, Mrs Skinner, and Mme. Celli, with introduction to Mrs Grasice. Went to Stockbridge to call upon her; she was out. In the evening at a pleasant soirée at Mrs Masson's. Talked with Mrs Burnett, Sir A Grant President of the University there and a brother of Carlyle's, also Professor Blackie. Sir A Grant talked much with Mattie.

Wednesday 9

Left Edinburgh at quarter to 10 pm for London, arrived in London at half to 9. Found Cleve pale from whooping cough. Edward very poorly in bed, the rest well.

Thursday 10

Arrived at King's Cross station at half to 9 a.m. as written on Wednesday. Miss Nelson called. Wrote to Mattie. Louie here all day.

Friday 11

Walked to Gower Street to make enquiries for Louie. Called on Mrs Pyne -- did not seen her as she had come to my house. I saw Mr P., Constance and Miss James who reported all the babies well. Wrote to Mattie. Louie here all day.

Saturday 12

Walked to Marylebone Lane. Wrote to Mattie. Louie here all day.

Sunday 13

Went to Christchurch with Holroyd, then to a lecture by Huxley on the dark and fair races which have peopled Britain. Mr James passed 8 hours here and talked trash all the time

[Who was this? Thomas James died 1853 and his son Thomas Andrew James in 1841].

Monday 14

At home all morning. Walked in the afternoon to B…s’s(?) to execute some messages for Agnes. Louie here all day. Cleve much better. In the evening letter from J D H S announcing that he would return from Manchester that evening.

Tuesday 15

At home all morning. Wrote to and received letter from Mattie. Out in afternoon, called on Miss Nelson. J E H S called. Holroyd out in the evening. Edward and Cleve better. Whooping cough very distressing to a child by reason of the dread of the coming spasm. I think there must be a feeling of strangling as he saw he had his band round him at night.

Thursday 17

John Sharpe came in the evening, he and Edward amused themselves and us with gentle cheerful music.

Friday 18

I walked a little before dinner, wrote to Mattie. Julia went to see Misses Shurr. Miss S. completed her 93rd year this month, was stitching a shirt collar and enjoying conversation. Louie came in the afternoon. J E H S in the evening.

Saturday 19

Went to Greenwich -- saw little Julia playing in the Park. She recognised me and was pleased to see me. Edward and Emma gardening -- Holroyd came in the evening and we returned by London Bridge and Underground. I went by Holborn Viaduct for the first time.

[Little Julia as distinct from Julia. The latter being MAC’s daughter, the former being the daughter of MAC’s brother Edward, who lived at Greenwich, his wife being Emma.]

Sunday 20

At Christ Church, sermon on National Education

Monday 21

Louie here. I called on the Pynes.

Tuesday 22

Julia went to the dentist. At home all morning. At Mrs Pyne’s in the evening, and Holroyd came in late and returned home with me. Louie here. She went with Julia to meet Ellen at 5 York Street, as they were afraid baby would catch whooping cough. All hope of the arrival of the missing American ship Boston abandoned. Wrote to Mattie.

Thursday 24

Louie came here. Went in the afternoon with Julia to call on Mrs Lebéque and Miss L Shurr - saw there Miss Jessie Landseer, sister of Sir Edward Landseer.

Friday 25

Louie came. Snow in the afternoon. Went in the evening to a meeting on the educational question. Speakers Mill, Fawcell the blind philosopher -- Auberon Herbert who is an earnest good patriot truly philanthropic – St James’s hall full of people of various classes. Holroyd and Louie with me. Wrote to Ayrton and Allan.

Saturday 26

Snowing fast all morning - thawed in the afternoon. At four o'clock went to a meeting in Hanover Square Rooms. Mill etc addressed the meeting. Mrs Taylor in the chair. Miss Taylor quite an orator "tra" or "tress." Hall full.

Sunday 27

Went to St Michael’s Church -- called on the Pynes.

Monday 28

Letter from Mattie. Wrote to her. Walked to Baker Street. Read Garibaldi's "Rule of the Monk". Very interesting as a medium through which to read his character -- his denunciation of the papacy is lofty yet humourous. Julia with bad toothache. Louie here. J E H. away. Cleve better.
[From Encyclopaedia Britannica: Garibaldi was responsible for most of the military victories of the Risorgimento, not least because he was one of the great masters of guerrilla warfare. Almost equally important was his contribution as a propagandist to the unification of Italy. Himself a man of the common people, he knew far better than Cavour or Mazzini how to reach the masses with the new message of patriotism. Furthermore, the fact that he used his military and political gifts for liberal or nationalist causes coincided well with current fashion and brought him great acclaim. In addition, he attracted support by being a truly honest man who asked little for himself.]

Tuesday 29

Julia went to dentist. Miss James called. I walked to Victoria Press. Louie here. Holroyd and Edward not home to dinner.

Wednesday 30

Read Garibaldi's book. Letter from Mattie. Went to Notting Hill to find Mr Froebel respecting kindergarten, did not succeed. Called on Georgina. Louie here. Charlie Celli came in the evening, read interesting papers on CD acts.

Thursday 31

Called on Mrs Nelson. Saw them all and paid bills. Ottie Stewards’s sixth birthday.

[Walter John Wyndham Steward was six on 30.3.1870].


April

Friday 1

Called on Mrs McCann who told me that a duel arose when she was a child, because her mother boxed the ears of a spoilt child who threw pellets of bread in her face. The father demanded an apology from her father who, refusing, a dual ended when the latter was severely wounded in the arm.

Saturday 2

Mattie came home. Lunched with Louie to meet Gustave Hourens who talked republicanism in an amusing and earnest spirit. He appears to be a good man.

Sunday 3
Went to Christ Church. Louie dined here. John came in the evening

Monday 4

Walked to Edgware Road. Weather extremely cold. Holroyd went to Bedford on business.

Tuesday 5

Miss Fogerty arrived from India and lunched here with her little brother and sister. Afterwards she took some lodgings. Called on Louie.

Wednesday 6

Miss Fogerty wrote to say she did not want those lodgings. The landlady justly claims a week's rent. Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. Mattie, Louie and Holroyd went to the Slades. Called at the Pynes. Took Cleve out. First fine spring day, South wind. Ada Dixon called.

Thursday 7

Called on Louie. Took Cleve out for the first time since his cough -- the first fine day with South wind. In the evening J & L, Mr B(?), H Celli & young Butler of the BM took tea with us. They talked Greek. Florance had a little girl

[This was Lilian Grace Caroline Steward, who married Adolfo Arturo Burlamacchi].

Friday 8

Took Cleve out. Visited Georgina - then by omnibus to Maddox Street to see the Derreys. Julia with me to Georgina's. All this for 11d, comfortably. Mrs Pyne called.

Saturday 9

At home in the morning. Wrote to Ayrton. Louie came. Ada Dixon called.

Sunday 10

Went to Christ Church. Louie dined here. Arthur Dixon and Charlie called here in the evening. The former after his manual work at Crewe seems to be physically and as far as I could judge morally a fine specimen of mankind.

Monday 11

Took Cleve out

Tuesday 12

Went to church. In the evening to Mr Kent’s(?). Examined corals,. Saw beautiful ferns. Mattie with me.

Wednesday 13

Went to York Street to meet Ellen, thence to call on Mrs H Jones who was out, thence to Miss Skinner who went into raptures over a hideous ill-painted portrait of herself by Smidt. Holroyd went to Croyde. Louie came here.

Thursday 14

Louie came here. I went to Miss Dykes. Mr Celli passed the day here. Little Cleve very poorly. Mattie advises trying chloral.

Friday 15

Went to Christ Church. Pauline Dardis with me. Julia at St Cyprians. Cleve not so well. Went with Mattie to examine objects through the microscope. W S Kent came back with us to take tea here. C Celli at tea here. Louie and Johnny here.

Saturday 16

Cleve better, into the square garden most of the day. Letter from Holroyd. Florrie very ill. Called at Mrs Evegards. Louie here in the afternoon. Mattie and Julia went to Miss Skinner's and the Jones’s.

Monday 18

Called on Helen Grenfell, saw her two fine boys, Nic four months old - one a wonderfully fine child. In the afternoon went to Sevenoaks to look for lodgings for Louie and Cleve, got out by mistake at Shoreham Station and altogether walked about eight miles, then obliged to walk up and down the platform for 25 minutes as the evening was very cold -- train that much late.

Tuesday 19

Shine came to take an affectionate leave of us. Holroyd returned late from Croyde.

Wednesday 20

John went with Shine and his boy to the docks and saw him off, the poor fellow will at least get a good meal or two every day during the voyage. Mrs Nelson and Miss Dardis called.

Thursday 21

Went in the square with Cleve in the morning -- drove across the park with him in the afternoon. M. Hourens called. Julia, Holroyd and Edward went to John Sharpe’s in the evening. Miss James called.

Friday 22

In the square with Cleve in the morning. Afternoon called on Georgina who spoke of the serious illness of Morland. Louie went out with Cleve. Mattie painted at the British Museum.

Saturday 23

Louie's birthday. She dined here, drove out with Cleve


May

Monday 2

Weather extremely cold -- 38. The papers compare this temperature with the year of the Crimean War, 1855. Received letter from Julia at Tunbridge Wells and from Ayrton. The house dull without them all. Consoled myself with Mattie's clever painting of the wounded Amazon. Received a letter from Alan -- news of his expected returned home.

Tuesday 3

Called on Louie. Saw Mrs Hoffman about the kinder garten. Called on M..Celli, saw Miss Sullivan now properly clothed and in her right mind, and young Scatola. At Mrs Pyne's in the evening, met Dr Wilkinson who is a red Republican. Sorry Florance could not be there.

Wednesday 4

To Marshal & Snel. for Agnes. Mrs Greathead called. In the evening went to an interesting lecture on "Palestine Explorations". It is surprising that work so interesting, especially one would suppose to the clergy, and requiring only an annual £5,000, should be languishing for want of funds.

Thursday 5

Louie came. We drew first sketch of kinder garten. Called on Ellen. Baby very bright and intelligent for eight months, will talk soon I think. Called on Mrs McCann, alone in the evening. Edward and Holroyd at Arthur Clifford's. Read a good sketch of Yedo in Japan.

Friday 6

Went to Greenwich. Slept there. Little Julie grown, she shows great observation of colours and general intelligence. Read en route a pretty novel "Hotel du Petit St Jean," scene in south of France. The writer knows it so well. I think he must have been there.

Saturday 7

Emma took me for a drive to Shooters Hill. The country looks dreary and backward, things seem rather to have shrunk than expanded during this cold week. Met Holroyd at Notting Hill and went with him a to look at houses.

Sunday 8

At Christ Church. Called on Kevin Morland, wife and boy came in to tea.

Monday 9

Walked about Maida Hill, house-seeking for Holroyd. Louie came from Tunbridge Wells -- brought well printed letter from C. Plebiscite going on against the government in the large towns.

Tuesday 10

Went with Alice Evegard to Hanover Sq Rooms with concert tickets -- doors all closed – wondered, and then discovered it was for the 17th. Saw Louie and John.

Wednesday 11

Went to Notting Hill to see Mrs Hoffman about kinder garten, we deplored together that parents will not see the disadvantage to children of ever leaving them with coarse ignorant persons. Saw a house in Ladbroke Grove, likely to send Holroyd. Expected Julia and Cleve but did not come. Holroyd and John went to the opening of London University.

[This probably refers to the London University Building, Burlington Gardens, which is or was at the back of the Royal Academy. Although founded in 1836, the University had no place of its own until the erection thirty-three years later of this building, after designs by Pennethorne.

Thursday 12

Julia and Cleve returned from Tunbridge Wells. I took him to Louie after dinner and went in the evening with Julia and Holroyd to John Sharpe's -- he read an interesting paper on Pernambuco -- his is a very rare fine character. Rained in the afternoon.

Friday 13

Called on Mrs Pyne with Cleve. Rained all morning. John and Louie came.

Saturday 14

Went with Holroyd to look at houses

Monday 16

Louie came here. Went to that Ludgate Hill etc. to order frames. Edward returned from Ellen’s. Heard of Allan having taken his passage for England -- and we expected him hourly

Thursday 19

On this day at 5.50 Allan came to Charing Cross Station having left England Nov 10th 1860. I should not have known him; but from the strong family likeness, others would know him to be my child. In character and mind much the same, his langour from ill-health contrasts strongly with his boyish energy and helpful activity when last I saw him.

Saturday 28

Went this evening to hear the Baboo Keshab Chunder Sen’s eloquent oration on the principles of Christianity and practice of the same. St. James Hall full of attentive listeners.

Sunday 29

Went to St. Paul’s to hear Liddon, a fine sermon addressed to the judges & counsel, Mayor and corporation, on brotherly love and charity - text "Am I my brother’s keeper?"

Monday 30

Julia went to Mrs Newton's drawing class


June

Wednesday 1

My 57th birthday and I thank God that I am so well in health and so happy w. the various relations of my life. I called on Alice Grenfell and saw her fine baby. Went to the Royal Academy with Julia -- charming picture by Millais of Walter Raleigh when a boy listening to a sailor’s story.

Thursday 2

John took Cleve to Kensington. I called on Mrs Howard, she and Ada just going the dreary tour of the park in an open carriage. Julia went to a concert with Allan and Holroyd

Friday 3

Agnes came to us after an absence of two and a half years. Maud Skinner also John Louie and Allan at dinner.

[Agnes Nugent Ayrton, MAC’s niece]

Saturday 4

Went with Cleve to see Miss L. Shurr on her 78th birthday. She looked about 65, dressed simply in very good taste. Never did a bouquet of flowers give greater pleasure than mine to her, and Cleve gave his little bunch of lilies of the valley, very pretty, holding them behind him to surprise her. They all went to see Ellen J. I enjoyed my quiet evening with my book as I seldom get the quiet moment for reading

Whit Monday 6

Went to Louie’s to luncheon with Cleve to meet the Robins’, one sang sweetly.

Tuesday 7

Went with Cleve to Primrose Hill, took his bread and butter and milk and water for a picnic -- fine day. He delighted in a party of little national school boys playing cricket, their conversation and manner very good and he might well have played with them alone.

Wednesday 8

At home in the morning. Agnes went to Greenwich, walked with Cleve in the evening.

Thursday 9

Mrs Williams and girls called. Agnes here at breakfast after which she went to her Aunt’s. In the evening at Louie’s -- about 20 of us. John, Louie, Maud and Edward acted a charade "Insolent,” admirably conceived and acted. Mrs Sharpe, the Robbinses, Jock Harding were there. Charles Dickens died.

Friday 10

Maud called. Went to Louie’s in the afternoon. When I read the account of Charles Dickens death in the paper I felt as if I had lost a friend. While he lay a-dying I was reading the last printed work of his vivid imagination. Received letter from Ayrton mentioning Allan's illness.

Saturday 11

Received no telegram so concluded Allan was better. Did not go to M. Celli’s concert. Walked out with Cleve.

Monday 13

Received letter from Ayrton telling me of Allan's serious illness so I left London by twelve o'clock train. Louie and Cleve went to Margate. Arrived at station at a quarter to eight or later, my great anxiety was relieved by hearing from de Lacy Hughes that Allan was much better. Saw Baby asleep. She is like her father.

[MAC went to Looe in Cornwall – Ayrton was the Vicar and Allan was staying with him. The baby must have been Ayrton’s daughter Ursula, born in November 1969]

Friday 17

Allan better and went out for a drive

[At this point a press cutting about the French declaration of war:
THE FRENCH DECLARATION OF WAR
The following is the text of the French Declaration of War, delivered at Berlin on the 19 inst:
The undersigned Chargé d’Affaires of France has the honour, in conformity with the orders he has received from his Government, to bring the following communication to the knowledge of his Excellency the Minister of Foreign Affairs of his Majesty the King of Prussia. The Government of his Majesty the Emperor of the French being unable to view the project of placing a Prussian Prince on the Spanish throne otherwise than as an action directed against the security of the territories of France, found itself obliged to demand of his Majesty the King of Prussia the assurance that such a combination could not be realised with his consent. His Majesty having refused to give any such guarantee, and having, on the contrary, declared to the Ambassador of His Majesty the Emperor of the French that he intends to reserve to himself for that eventuality, as for any other, the right to be guided by circumstances, the Imperial Government has been forced to see in this declaration of the King an arrière pensée menacing in like manner to France and the European equilibrium. This declaration has been rendered worse by the communication made to the different Cabinets of the King's refusal to receive the ambassador of the Emperor, and to enter into any further explanations with him. In consequence hereof the French Government has thought it its duty to take immediate steps for the defence of its honour and its injured interests, and has resolved to adopt, for this object, all measures which the situation in which it has been placed renders necessary. It considers itself from this moment in a state of war against Prussia.
The undersigned has the honour to be, your Excellency etc. Le Sourd, Berlin, June 15]

Saturday 18

Allan would go to London in spite of all persuasion, and not being able to get the pony he went to the station with a pair of horses

Monday 20

At Looe gardening, overlooking man cutting down bank in front of kitchen. Glad to get a note from Allan

Tuesday 21

Gardening. Had pleasant letters from all at home.

Wednesday 22

Glad to hear that Allan reached London without breaking down and having to put up at some hotel etc..

Saturday 25

Left Looe at eight o'clock. Edith and little Ursula quite well, the latter looking solemn, with her little Roman nose. Shopping at Plymouth with Ayrton -- left at 2 o'clock and got to London at 10.

Monday 27

Allan came home from Margate. Spent the evening here. Emma and Julia lunched here. Walked with them to New Street. Miss Lockyers and Sophy Jay(?) passed the evening here -- the latter took a great interest in all concerning the dear child, his toys and books all spread about the table made him so present to me that I could hardly fancy he was away.

Tuesday 28

Went to King's Cross en route for Highgate to see Ellen at half past 9 but through some special inaptitude for railway progression I failed to get from that Station, returned home to dinner and tried again at four o'clock, arrived there duly; all very rural and pretty just now and the scene has beauties of its own which had I not just come from Looe I should have enjoyed more.

Wednesday 29

Tried in the morning to see Dr Newton’s special powers of healing and endured for some time being wedged in a dirty crowd behind the little chapel in Church Street. Obliged to leave, shall try again. Julia went to stay at the Greatheads. Allan came

Thursday 30

Looked for house for Holroyd. Went to Agnes’s in the evening.

July

Friday 1

Paid bills in the morning, worked, wrote letters. Allan dined with us, also Maud.

Saturday 2

Looking for houses with Holroyd

Monday 4

Prince Charles of Hohenzollern put forward as the most likely candidate for the Spanish throne. Opposed by France who dreads the Prussian influence and talks big about war with Prussia if that country upholds this candidate instead of the boy prince -- son of Isabella. What can be expected from the son of this mother?

Tuesday 5

Holroyd went to sleep at Greenwich. Effie staying there.

Wednesday 6

Looking at houses. Letter from Julia saying she was going to join Louie at Margate. Told Llewellyn Davies about the rude ill usage of little boys by gardener which he received apathetically.

Thursday 7

Called on Mrs Pyne. Mrs Nelson and Evegards. Made jam (strawberry).

Friday 8

Looking about for a house for Holroyd. Allan and Edward at dinner, also Maud Skinner. Walked with her to Portman Square -- very tired. Reading "Tower of London." Hepworth Dixon useful historically and agreeably written.

[At this point a press cutting from the Scotsman, Saturday, July 9, 1870, which reads as follows:
“Surgeons’ Hall and the Lady Students -- at a meeting of the lecturers of Surgeons Hall on Thursday, the following resolutions were passed, on the motion of Dr Arthur Gamgee, seconded by Dr Macadam: 1. That it is expedient that lecturers in this medical school should be free to lecture to female as well as to male students.
2. That no restrictions be imposed upon lecturers as to the manner in which instruction is to be imparted to women.
The lecturers were authorised to make what arrangements they considered desirable to carry out these resolutions, either by separate class or in mixed classes.”]

Saturday 9

Effie came to town from Greenwich, we went to look for a house for them. In the evening at Agnes’s. Edward and Allan went to Highgate. Effie and Holroyd returned to Greenwich. Read "Edwin Drood," some of Dickens’s best writing, or is it that in reading it one dwells with interest now on every passage and refuses to see any blemish?

Monday 11

Dined at Greenwich. Allan dined there also. Shopping with Agnes. Went to look at houses for Holroyd

Wednesday 13

Went shopping with Effie to Debenhams to buy (?) her wedding dresses.

[Effie (Euphemia Isabella) Skinner was to be married to Holroyd Chaplin on 16 August. MAC, her energetic future mother-in-law, helps her, maybe because Effie’s own mother is bed-ridden and is anyway far away from London, in South Devon.]

Thursday 14

Louie and Cleve returned from Margate. Allan came. Cleve not looking very well. Julia at Margate. War declared between France and Prussia. France jealous of King William of Prussia supporting Prince of Hohenzollern’s candidature to throne of Spain.

Friday 15

Walked with Cleve to Pynes’s - in the evening Miss Skinner Maud and the Robbins, Will Greathead and Agnes came.

Saturday 16

Up at half past five, went with Louie and Cleve to put Cleve on board the (?) steamer - returned along the Thames Embankment and enjoyed the fresh river breeze. With Agnes in the afternoon - Ayrton Edith and baby Ursula came late at night - Edward Feild at Gravesend with Sh(?).

Monday 18

Engaged with baby, called at Mrs Pyne's. Effie and Holroyd at the Carrs. Edward returned. Allan came in the evening. Everyone talking of the war, French army in eight divisions - fall of Napoleon predicted; all countries promise neutrality -- except Prussia of course.
[From the Encyclopaedia Britannica: FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR (July 19, 1870-May 10, 1871), war in which a coalition of German states led by Prussia defeated France. The war marked the end of French hegemony in continental Europe and resulted in the creation of a unified Germany.
Prussia's defeat of Austria in the Seven Weeks' War in 1866 had confirmed Prussian leadership of the German states and threatened France's position as the dominant power in Europe. The immediate cause of the Franco-German War, however, was the candidacy of Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (who was related to the Prussian royal house) for the Spanish throne, which had been left vacant when Queen Isabella II had been deposed in 1868. The Prussian chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, and Spain's de facto leader, Juan Prim, persuaded the reluctant Leopold to accept the Spanish throne in June 1870. This move greatly alarmed France, who felt threatened by a possible combination of Prussia and Spain directed against it. Leopold's candidacy was withdrawn under French diplomatic pressure, but the Prussian king William I was unwilling to bow to the French ambassador's demands that he promise to never again allow Leopold to be a candidate for the Spanish throne. Bismarck edited William's telegraphed description of this interview, and on July 14 he published this provocative message (the Ems telegram;), which accomplished his purposes of infuriating the French government and provoking it into a declaration of war.
The French emperor, Napoleon III, declared war on Prussia on July 19, 1870, because his military advisers told him that the French army could defeat Prussia and that such a victory would restore his declining popularity in France. The French were convinced that the reorganization of their army in 1866 had made it superior to the German armies. They also had great faith in two recently introduced technical innovations: the breech-loading chassepot rifle, with which the entire army was now equipped; and the newly invented mitrailleuse, an early machine gun. The French generals, blinded by national pride, were confident of victory.
Bismarck, for his part, saw war with France as an opportunity to bring the South German states into unity with the Prussian-led North German Confederation and build a strong German Empire. The Germans had superiority of numbers, since, true to Bismarck's hopes, the South German states (Bavaria, Wurttemberg, and Baden) regarded France as the aggressor in the conflict and had thus sided with Prussia. An equally important asset was the Prussian army's general staff, which planned the rapid, orderly movement of large numbers of troops to the battle zones. This superior organization and mobility enabled the chief of the general staff, General Helmuth von Moltke, to exploit German superiority in numbers in most of the war's battles.
The efficient German mobilization contrasted with confusion and delay on the French side. Germany was able to deliver 380,000 troops to the forward zone within 18 days of the start (July 14) of mobilization, while many French units reached the front either late or with inadequate supplies. The vast German and French armies that then confronted each other were each grouped into right and left wings. After suffering a check at the Battle of Wörth on Aug. 6, 1870, the commander of the French right (south) wing, Marshal Patrice Mac-Mahon, retreated westward. That same day, about 40 miles (65 km) to the northeast, the commander of the French left wing, Marshal Achille Bazaine, was dislodged from near Saarbrücken and fell back westward to the fortress of Metz. His further retreat was checked by the German right wing in two blundering battles on August 16 and 18, respectively (see Mars-la-Tour and Gravelotte, Battles of), and he then took refuge behind the defenses of Metz indefinitely.
The French right wing, commanded by Mac-Mahon and accompanied by Napoleon himself, attempted to relieve Bazaine but was itself surrounded and trapped by the Germans in a disastrous battle at Sedan (see Sedan, Battle of) on August 31. On September 2, 83,000 encircled French troops, with Napoleon and Mac-Mahon, surrendered. Since Bazaine's army was still bottled up in Metz, the result of the war was virtually decided by this surrender.
French resistance was carried on against desperate odds by a new government of national defense, which assumed power in Paris on Sept. 4, 1870, and proclaimed the deposition of the emperor and the establishment of the Third Republic. On September 19 the Germans began to besiege Paris. Jules Favre, foreign minister in the new government, went to negotiate with Bismarck, but the negotiations were broken off when he found that Germany demanded Alsace and Lorraine. Léon Gambetta, the leading figure in the provisional government, organized new French armies in the countryside after escaping from besieged Paris in a balloon. These engaged but could not defeat the German forces. Bazaine capitulated at Metz with his 140,000 troops intact on October 27, and Paris surrendered on Jan. 28, 1871.
The armistice of January 28 included a provision for the election of a French National Assembly, which would have the authority to conclude a definite peace. This settlement was finally negotiated by Adolphe Thiers and Favre and was signed February 26 and ratified March 1. Between then and the conclusion of the formal Treaty of Frankfurt on May 10, 1871, the republican government was threatened by an insurrection in Paris, in which radicals established their own short-lived government, the Paris Commune. The Commune was suppressed after two months, and the harsh provisions of the Treaty of Frankfurt were then implemented: Germany annexed Alsace and half of Lorraine, with Metz. Furthermore, France had to pay an indemnity of 5 billion francs and cover the costs of the German occupation of France's northern provinces until the indemnity was paid. The culminating triumph of Bismarck's plans came on Jan. 18, 1871, when King William I of Prussia was proclaimed German emperor at Versailles, the former palace of the kings of France.
The Franco-German War had far-reaching consequences. It established both the German Empire and the French Third Republic. With Napoleon III no longer in power to protect them, the Papal States were annexed by Italy (Sept. 20, 1870), thereby completing that nation's unification. The Germans' crushing victory over France in the war consolidated their faith in Prussian militarism, which would remain a dominant force in German society until 1945. (Additionally, the Prussian system of conscript armies controlled by a highly trained general staff was soon adopted by the other great powers.) Most importantly, Germany's annexation of Alsace-Lorraine aroused a deep longing for revenge in the French people. The years from 1871 to 1914 were marked by an extremely unstable peace, since France's determination to recover Alsace-Lorraine and Germany's mounting imperialist ambitions kept the two nations constantly poised for conflict. Their mutual animosity proved to be the driving force behind the prolonged slaughter on the Western Front in World War I.]

Tuesday 19

Received letters from Louie who is comfortably settled in lodgings at Withernsea. Mrs Rollings and Mrs (?) Jones called, Mrs R brought Mattie two beautiful brooches from Italy.

Wednesday 20

Julia returned home from Greenwich. Allan Holroyd Ayrton and Effie went to the theatre. Julia gave her ticket to Ayrton.

[At this point a press cutting about the war:
PROCLAMATION OF THE EMPEROR NAPOLEON TO THE FRENCH PEOPLE. Paris, July 23.
The emperor has addressed the following proclamation to the French people:
"Frenchmen, -- there are solemn moments in the life of peoples when the national honour, violently excited, imposes itself with irresistible force, dominates all interests, and alone takes in hand the direction of the destinies of the country. One of those decisive hours has sounded for France. Prussia, to whom, both during and since the war of 1866, we have shown the most conciliatory disposition, has taken no account of our good wishes and our forbearance. Launched on the path of invasion, she has aroused defiance, everywhere necessitated exaggerated armaments, and has turned Europe into a camp, where nothing but uncertainty and fear of the morrow reigns. A last incident has come to show the instability of international relations, and to prove the gravity of the situation. In presence of the new pretensions of Prussia we made our protestations to be heard. They were evaded, and were followed on the part of Prussia by contemptuous proceedings. Our country has resented this with profound irritation, and immediately a cry for war resounded from one end of France to the other. It only remains for us to confide our destinies to the decision of arms. We do not make war on Germany, whose independence we respect. Let us wish that the peoples who compose the great German nationality may freely dispose of their destinies. For ourselves we demand the establishment of a state of affairs which shall guarantee our security and assure our future. We wish to conquer a lasting peace based on the true interest of peoples, and to put an end to the precarious state in which all nations employ their resources to arm themselves one against the other. The glorious flag which we once more unfurl before those who have provoked us is the same which bore throughout Europe the civilising ideas of our great revolution. It represents the same principles, and inspires the same devotion. Frenchmen, I place myself at the head of that valiant army which is animated by love of duty and of country. It knows its own worth, since it has seen how victory has accompanied its march in the four quarters of the world. I shall take my son with me, despite his youth. He knows what are the duties which his name imposes upon him, and he is proud to bear a share in the dangers of those who fight for their country. May God bless our efforts. A great people which defends a just cause is invincible. "Napoleon."]

Thursday 21

Went out with Effie. Miss Dardis called. Maud came in the evening.

[Press cutting about the war:
PRUSSIAN REPLY TO THE DUKE DE GRAMONT’S CIRCULAR. Berlin, July 22, Evening.
The following statement has been published:
"In reference to a circular of the Duke de Gramont, published yesterday, and of which a telegraphic summary has been received here, alleging that the Chancellor of the North German Confederation has declared the candidature of the Prince of Hohenzollern to be impossible, and that the Under-Secretary of State, Baron Thile, has pledged his word that such a candidature did not exist, both the Chancellor and the Secretary declare officially and in their private capacity that not a single word on the subject has ever passed between either of them and M. Benedetti, either officially or in private conversation, since they were first aware of the fact that the offer of the Spanish Crown had been made to the Prince of Hohenzollern."

REPULSE OF PRUSSIAN TROOPS. Forbach, July 24
The Prussian troops yesterday advanced as far as Carling, but were vigorously attacked and repulsed by French foot Chasseurs. At the same time a regiment of mounted Chasseurs made a reconnaissance on Prussian territory. The Prussians appear to be assuming the offensive.

THE ATTITUDE OF RUSSIA. St. Petersburg, July 24
The Official Journal of today contains the following: "The Imperial Russian Government has made all possible endeavours to avert the outbreak of war. Unfortunately the rapidity with which the warlike resolutions were taken rendered our efforts for the maintenance of peace abortive. The Emperor is resolved to observe neutrality, so long as Russia's interests are not affected by the eventualities of the campaign. The Russian Government undertakes to support every endeavour to circumscribe the operations and diminish the duration of the war."

THE NEUTRALITY OF ITALY. Florence, July 23
The Official Gazette of this evening announces that the Italian Government has received notification that war is declared between France and the North German Confederation, Bavaria, Wurtemburg, Baden and Hesse. The Gazette recalls the obligations of strict neutrality which are incumbent upon Italian subjects, and the penalties incurred by any infraction of the laws.]


Friday 22

Went to Wimbledon with Effie. Saw the Commissioner Holroyd. Miss H [Sarah Holroyd] very bowed in her spine for her age (about 70). Drank tea with the Pynes. Agnes there.

[Commissioner Holroyd was Edward Holroyd, born 24th July, 1794, died 29th January, 1881. He was a barrister, and was subsequently appointed Senior Commissioner of the Bankruptcy Court in London. He had six children, of whom Edward Dundas Holroyd, Q.C., who emigrated to Melbourne, and became a Judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria, was one. For more about the Holroyds see Holroyd Family_booklet.doc, by Edward’s brother Thomas].

[Press cutting: Strasburg July 22. “The Prussians blew up the abutment on the Baden shore of the bridge at Kehl at 4 am today. The explosion was terrific. The bridge turrets were destroyed, and the debris thrown as far as the French shore.”]

Saturday 23

Called on Agnes found her sadly excited about her misunderstanding with Mrs G, tried in vain to persuade her that Julia was not the cause of it. George Smith of Tonbridge called.

Monday 25

Holroyd and Effie went early to Royal Academy. Julia went to see Mrs Rollings who kindly gave her some coral ornaments. Went shopping with J. in the evening. Letter from Louie. She speaks with much resignation of John's departure to Prussia as correspondent to the "Daily News."

[For an account of some of J E H S’s activities in Prussia and Paris see ‘RECOLLECTIONS of MR. SKINNER By ARCHIBALD FORBES, in Family Tree file at John Edwin Hilary Skinner – Notes.]

Tuesday 26

Effie and Holroyd dined with Acton

Wednesday 27

Effie left for Devonshire to reside previous to her marriage. Ellen Taylor.

Thursday 28

Ellen Taylor and baby and Mrs J. -- Miss Adshead - came to early dinner. A baby show -- the little Ursula contemplative and quiet. Then J. lively as a monkey, not still an instant. Allan in the evening.

Friday 29

Emma and Agnes came to early dinner -- little Julia very poorly.

Saturday 30

Ayrton left for Cornwall. Edith too poorly to go with him. Julia left for Macclesfield, Edward the same.

August

Monday 1

Edith and baby left at half to 5 a.m. for Mrs Pyne’s Gun?er’s Grove, Somerset, passed the day in "putting to rights." Allan dined here, read the clever political squib Jinx’s(?) baby.

[‘Squib’ - a short satirical composition – Early 16th Century]
[The Pynes came from Somerset and Henry Pyne was evidently wealthy - it seems that, like Allan Maclean Skinner, he had a house in the West Country as well as in London.]

Wednesday 3

Called on Maud whom I missed, as she came here. Then on to Greenwich, saw Emma and little Julia who looked ill but better, and returned home at ten o'clock, read "Esmond." Thackeray is a clever imitator of Fielding’ - wants the originality of genius so eminently seen in Dickens works and in Miss Evans "George Eliot."

Thursday 4

Louie and Cleve returned from Withernsea, boat detained in the Thames by fog. Agnes and Miss Spurling(?) called. Maud also. Engagement at Saarbruck between French and Prussians, the former attacking. Prussians defeated.

Friday 5

Louie and I alone at dinner.

[Louie and John evidently had a house in London (see entry for 9 June), but Louie is probably MAC’s most frequent visitor – especially now that John is away reporting on the war?]


Saturday 6

Allan and Holroyd here. Rumours of a great battle being fought between Prussians and French

Sunday 7

Rumours of great Prussian victory and 4000 prisoners taken by them.

Monday 8

The great victory confirmed. Rout of French army and death of Mac-Mahon.
[From Encyclopaedia Brittanica (Sept. 1, 1870), decisive defeat of the French army in the Franco-German War, which led to the fall of the Second French Empire; it was fought at the French border fortress of Sedan on the Meuse River, between 120,000 French troops under Marshal Mac-Mahon and more than 200,000 German troops under General Helmuth von Moltke.
Mac-Mahon had intended to march his army, accompanied by Napoleon III, from Châlons-sur-Marne northeast toward Metz, to relieve the French Army of the Rhine, which was trapped at Metz. Moltke learned of Mac-Mahon's movements through newspaper reports and rapidly moved the newly formed Army of the Meuse, under Crown Prince Albert of Saxony, north to intercept Mac-Mahon. In three small engagements on the Meuse River (August 29 to 31), the Germans forced Mac-Mahon to fall back to the fortress at Sedan. While Mac-Mahon tried to consider whether to try again to smash through eastward toward Metz or instead to retreat west to Paris, Moltke moved up the 3rd Prussian Army, under Crown Prince Frederick William, to complete the encirclement of Sedan.
The wounding of Mac-Mahon early on September 1 caused extreme confusion in the French command, allowing the Germans to carry on their encirclement without serious opposition. Thereafter, the desperate French efforts to break out, including massive cavalry charges, led to nothing but high casualties. After the German artillery had pounded the French position in an all-day bombardment, the Germans launched their main attack in the afternoon. Emperor Napoleon III realized that the position was hopeless. He surrendered, and the next morning he and 83,000 French soldiers became prisoners of war. The French had lost 3,000 men killed, 14,000 wounded, and 21,000 missing or captured. German losses totaled 9,000 men killed and wounded. As the victorious Germans marched toward Paris, a popular uprising there on September 4 toppled the government of the Second Empire and set up a provisional republican government.]

Saturday 13

Left London by steamer for Plymouth with Holroyd Louie and Cleve -- weather fine.

Sunday 14

On board steamer, arrived at Plymouth about 12 midnight.

Monday 15

Landed at Plymouth, booked our luggage. Holroyd left us to buy a bridal bouquet for Effie. We went on the Hoe and I took Cleve to see the fort here. We met Holroyd and then joined Louie. We dined at a Pastrycook’s -- Holroyd went to Newton Abbot: by afternoon train - Louis Cleve and I went to Newton, met Mr Skinner. Went to the Globe Hotel where Holroyd and Allan joined us -- presently came in Kate then Mattie.

Tuesday 16

On this day I nerved myself to part with my dear son whose quiet sincere affection I have enjoyed for thirty years with but little interruption, but I resign him cheerfully in the hope that his happiness may be much increased as mine will be diminished by the daily loss of his society -- may his married life be happy! Left Newton with a heavy heart for Looe, much comforted by the love of Matty and Cleve with me.

[So it seems possible that Holroyd Chaplin and Effie Skinner were married at Bickington or Newton Abbott. Have added this provisionally to the Family Tree.]


Wednesday 17

At Looe. Edith and Ayrton not at home and the place consequently dreary. A most unpleasant position, to be in the hands of inefficient servants without power to govern and order.

Thursday 18

At Looe. Louie arrived from Newton.

Friday 19

Louie bathed in the sea

Saturday 20

Ayrton came home with Edith and baby who was very poorly and alarmed us by getting daily worse.

Monday 22

All very busy preparing for the bazaar which not one of us did with a very good will as we were thinking more of baby. Deadining all day, this stupid indirect way of giving money.

Friday 26

Louie left Looe. Baby improving in health.

Monday 29

Great preparations for bazaar, dear baby better. Agnes arrived in the evening, also de Lacy Hughes

Tuesday 30

Tents pitched in the garden and this absurd game of selling commenced

Wednesday 31

Continued today.

September

Thursday 1

We all rejoiced that the affair was over. The whole place looked like a tea garden. In the morning we were glad to see men clearing away tents etc.

Saturday 3

Agnes left us. Mattie bathed Cleve

Monday 5

Cleve very happy riding on a donkey

Thursday 8

I left Looe to visit Mrs Skinner at Bickington, South Devon

[Bickington is just off the A38, near Newton Abbott]

Sat 10

Went with Kate to Hayter -- day lovely air exhilarating and view from that Tor surpassing beautiful - how I enjoyed that drive in the cart going slowly on like a loitering walk all the way, giving one time to enjoy the lovely scenery.

Monday 12

I left Newton to join Mattie and Cleve at Plymouth station, sent Mattie to Bickington, took Cleve to have some dinner and then at his particular desire to the fort -- had tea in the town, then went on board.

Tuesday 13

Slept well on board, no sickness. The dear child happy all day and entertaining everyone by his lively imagination and knowledge of the positions of the contending armies and his anxiety about the contents of the newspaper which I got at Southampton. Fine views along Havant. (?) a thousand casks of butter at Southampton

Wednesday 14

Arrived at B. Square at 5 in the afternoon. Holroyd and Effie had already arrived.

Thursday 15

Going about with Effie this day after furniture.

Wednesday 28

This evening Louie and I took that good little woman Mrs Shine to Euston station – L. in the cab with her, I walked with the two children, eight with them were comfortably placed in a second class carriage. An intelligent printer kindly promised to assist her on her journey towards Chicago.

Thursday 29

Holroyd and Effie left me – alas! and then Mattie and I dined at Mrs Rolling’s and Mrs Williams’s.

Friday 30

We all met at Holroyd's house and had a pleasant evening there -- enjoyed it more than a formal spread.


October

Saturday 1

Allan came to stay with me. The halfpenny stamps for newspapers and message cards introduced this day -- read several advertisements in that form. Went with Mattie to King's Cross Station -- how I wished I could have gone with her to Edinburgh.

Sunday 2

An excellent sermon on the war from Llewellyn Davies

Monday 3

Went to Adelaide Road to take Louie's two letters from John. Dear Cleve performed his exercises. In the afternoon walked with Effie.

Tuesday 4

Went to the Euston Rd with Effie to look for cheap furniture. Louie came to tea and stayed to dinner. "Each child that is born has a little kingdom of thought of his own which it is a sin in us to invade" Thackeray, “Virginians.” We only make hypocrites of them by commanding them over much.

Thursday 6

Went with Effie to look for furniture.

Friday 7

Called on Mrs Nelson, met Margaret Nugent there -- also on the Evegards - Mr F. Evegard obliged to have 4 soldiers in his house which he leaves in charge of his servant, he left also a good collection of articles vertu. Went with Effie out at Holroyd’s in the evening. Louie came in the morning.

[MAC’s eldest daughter was Julia Margaret Nugent Chaplin (born 1837), and according to the Chaplin & Skinner family book she married James Edward Nugent (born 1833) in 1886, and had a daughter Margaret Nugent. All a bit late for an 1870 diary! Could the marriage date be incorrect? It seems very unlikely that she married in 1886 at 49 years of age and then went on to have four children! A marriage date of 1856 would be more likely, and a 5 could be read by the printer as an 8. But in the MAC diaries 1870 to 1873 there is no obvious mention of James Edward Nugent, and Julia seems almost to live at her mother’s house. A bit of a mystery, but perhaps the Edward below is not MAC’s brother, but Julia’s husband?]

Saturday 8

Received letters from Julia and Edward the former with (?), the latter asking me to enquire about a French nurse -- on doing so, heard very sad stories of the hardships the French refugees are enduring, many of good position in want of a house. In the afternoon Louie and Cleve came, both slept here.

Sunday 9

Elizabeth Boulton our cook for three years married to Henry Hinton.

Monday 10

Went with Effie to hear the inaugural address on the opening of the Female Medical Society for this term. Mrs Needham delivered it, Doctor Ross in the chair. Doctor Dugsdale and Doctor Edmonds spoke. Called on Mrs Williams and Mrs Rollings in Weymouth Street then on Margaret Nugent at Mrs Nelson's.

Tuesday 11

Went to Effie's -- using the sewing machine. Louie and Cleve came.

Friday 14

Allan dined with Holroyd

Saturday 15

Allan left for his duties at Hythe. Louie came. Edward Emma and little Julia called, all well.

Sunday 16

Collection at Christ Church for destitute French. Holroyd and Effie dined here. Louie and Cleve here.

Monday 17

Went to see Mrs Whichcote, met there Mme de (?) who when last I saw her almost 40 years ago was Miss (?), daughter of the Marylebone police magistrate. They had left Paris on account of the siege. Called at Putney on Miss Harcourt Slade – liked her -- saw Mrs Henry -- then to Kensington, saw both Miss Shurrs looking wonderfully well, Louisa at 78 quite young and her sister at 94 bright and active. Dined with Holroyd and Effie.

Tuesday 18

The German army going up and down France ad libitum. (?) post regularly established; and supplies regular. The only communication between Paris and the exterior by balloons. Those in camp must suffer from the heavy rains now.

Wednesday 19

Holroyd came here to dinner. I went to see Louie.

Thursday 20

Louie came with Cleve. She went to see Florrie at Ashley house. She and Cleve slept here. Holroyd came in the evening.

Friday 21

I went with Cleve to Adelaide Road, after lunch called on Florrie. She is scarcely able to walk. Saw Ottie, Henry and May, went with them also Louie Cleve and Miss Skinner to the station for Brighton. All looked as if requiring sea air. Louie and Cleve returned to Adelaide Road.


November

Tuesday 1

Cleve came here with mumps.

Friday 11

Allan came this evening looking very well -- the stupidity of some military and other men is incredible -- one amusement in camp is throwing missiles through a closed window.

Saturday 12

Julia returned from Croyde. I called on Holroyd. Allan went to Brighton to see Florance and her children and returned in the evening.

Tuesday 15

Louie started with Cleve at 7.40 am for Germany Carlsruhe via Ostend and Brussels. He is five years old with a fine intellect. I hope his mind will not be overweighed as it is so receptive. How his little spirit pervades the house. His pretty litter of toys everywhere makes him present to me. I am glad he is with his mother to cheer and delight her heart.

Wednesday 16

Same day - Ellen Taylor called with her husband. She looked ill. May the prescribed treatment effect her restoration to health! Youth may prevail but I fear doctors can't do much for her.

Friday 18

Received a letter from Louie posted at Bonn and written in the train en route from Brussels

Monday 21

Great fear of war with Russia for breaking the treaty regarding the Black Sea fleet. Called on Mrs Rollings and Mrs Witham. Wrote to Ayrton.

Tuesday 22

Letter from J E H S. Morning very rainy, afternoon fine, wind SW fresh. Went to see Effie. Julia to Charing X to get maps for J E H S. Letter from Louie in the evening telling of her being settled in the family of German schoolmaster at Carlsruhe.

Wednesday 23

Madame Celli dined here. Henri C and Ed Cole came to tea. Received letter from Allan. Wrote to Mattie and Louie. Effie called.

Thursday 24

Julia went to Highgate. I went to Effie's.

Friday 25

Engaged canvassing for Miss Garrett to be placed on the School Board. Called on Georgina, saw Jose and dear little girl.

Saturday 26

Engaged canvassing again, promise of success. Agnes called from Greenwich. Allan Holroyd and Effie called. The Miss Robbins’s came to tea. Letter from Louie -- she and Cleve very well.

Tuesday 29

Voted for Miss Garrett (a plumper) to be a member of the London School Board. Went to Brighton, called on Miss Dixon -- then after losing my way amongst the new buildings, to Florrie, found Miss Skinner there. The children charming in manner and lovely in aspect. Enjoyed a walk on the parade, saddened however by poor F’s helpless condition.
[According to the Shorter Oxford Dictionary, ‘plumper’ means “A vote cast at an election for a single candidate instead of an optional two or more.” and was first used in late 18th Century.]


Wednesday 30

At Brighton. Miss Drury the governess exerting a high church superstitious influence over the children who say prayers reverently and so it (?) by Maud and their mother they will however be influenced happily. Miss Garrett returned with 27,000 votes.


December

Thursday 1

At Brighton. The governess adopted by an aunt and sailor uncle who will exert a wholesome influence on her.

Friday 2

Returned to London with Florry Maud and the children, Ottie Henry and May -- baby Lilian at Cropthorne with her wet nurse. Went to Ashley House hoping to see Henry but he did not come in.

Sunday 4

Ottie, Henry, May dined with Maud - went to the zoological gardens with them. May terribly afraid of the lion, could not look at him after the first glance -- he looked fierce as it was feeding time. Florrie Miss S. Holroyd and Effie dined here.

Monday 12

Agnes came with Charles Hicks to announce her engagement to him. Emma and little Julia came with her.

[Edward, Emma’s husband, was uncle to Agnes.]

Saturday 24

Mattie came from Edinburgh at 5 a.m., looking well

Sunday 25

Edward, Emma, Holroyd, Allan, Effie here.

Thursday 29

Edward Grenfell died at Bagley(?)


END

[It seems that sometime in February the following year, 1871, MAC put her furniture in storage and was without a house for one year and nine months – see diary entry for 18 October 1872. Why?]



Diary, 1872

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1872. In this year she became 59, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 16 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

[From October, MAC was living at 60 Westbourne Pk Rd, Julia at 130 Queen’s Rd, Will and Mattie in E India Rd, Louie and John at 60 Alexander Street.]

January

Monday 1

At Looe with Julia, Mattie and Will [who] left on the 31st December. Little Ursula two years old, intelligent, speaks quite plainly. Miss James with us -- we all except Julia, who was poorly, dined at Mr Bishops. Holroyd and Effie in London. Allan and Maud at 15 Osborne Villas, Cliftonville, Brighton.

[MAC with her oldest and youngest children, Julia (35) and Matilda (26), and her brother’s son William Ayrton (25), who had just married Matilda, were all staying with MAC’s second son Ayrton (30), who was then Rector of Looe. Little Ursula was Ayrton’s 3 yr old daughter, known as Ulla, who became a doctor, and whose niece Ursula Gregory (also a doctor), I knew at Bassetts in Little Baddow in 1947 as ‘Cousin Ursula’ when she was 51 and I was 17. Holroyd (32) was MAC’s oldest son and Effie (née Skinner) his wife. Allan (28) was her third son and Maud (née Skinner) his wife.]

Wednesday 3

Dined early at Mr Coles

Friday 5

Julia and Miss James left Looe, the former for London, the latter for Brighton.

[Very likely Mary Ann James]

Sunday 7

Went to church in the morning. Ayrton did not preach – intensely wet in the afternoon -- decided to leave next day as Will had to go to India on Thursday.

[William Ayrton worked in India for five years from 1867 according to his obituary. After they married and he returned to India Matilda studied in France. See 11 January and FTM-Chaplin, Matilda-Notes]

Monday 8

Left Looe at 8 a.m. for Exeter, thence to Barnstaple where I went in a trap to Croyde to see Mrs Skinner -- found her pretty well looking charmingly for her age in a woolly cloud of mauve and white. A lovely view from the house, with an island in the distance. Carry only at home of all that once large family circle -- she just recovered from (?). Mrs S. talking about her aunt just deceased -- saw the miniature of Mrs Savage her grandmother - very like Kate and Florrie, cameo of Lady Charlemont her mother's half brother.

[Three of MAC’s children (Louisa, Holroyd, Allan) had married three children of Alan Maclean Skinner and his wife Caroline Emily (60) (viz: John, Effie, Maud). Caroline was only about the same age as MAC herself. But she was an invalid, looked after by her daughter Caroline (32). They lived at Croyde, in Bideford Bay. So where was her husband Allan Maclean Skinner living? In London or Staffordshire? He was still a Judge, but resigned in September 1872. Kate and Florrie (Florance) were two of their daughters. Mrs Savage is a puzzle: Mrs Skinner’s grandmothers were Frances Harding née Probyn and ? Willoughby, née ? It wouldn’t be appropriate to use ‘Mrs’ in front of a maiden name. Could it have been her great-grandmother? But if her mother had a half-brother her mother’s mother might have been Mrs Savage for part of her life – that would explain it. But how could her mother’s half-brother be called Lady Charlemont? I shall assume half-sister!]

Tuesday 9

Left Croyde at 5.30 p.m., slept at Exeter, came on to London next day (10th), arrived in the afternoon at 34 Manchester square where Mattie and Will were living. Will arrived in the evening from Bexhill, left Edward much better.

[MAC’s daughter Matilda and her husband William Ayrton. William’s father Edward was Edward Nugent Ayrton, MAC’s brother, who died in November 1873]

Thursday 11

Will and Mattie left Manchester Square at 7 a.m.. She remained in Paris to study -- he went on to India. Called on Louie -- saw Miss Sullivan. Cleve affectionate and gentle as ever. Heard of Maud's illness.

[Cleve was John Allan Cleveland Skinner (7), son of MAC’s daughter Louisa. Who was Miss Sullivan?]

Friday 12

Decided to go to Brighton, arrived there are at 9 p.m., found Maud very ill -- both seemed glad to see me.

[Maud was MAC’s daughter in law. ‘Both’ very likely implies her son Allan]

Saturday 13

Walked alone. The air pleasant but very damp.

Sunday 14

Did not go to church. Maud better but very ill in bed.

Monday 15

Maud better

Tuesday 16

Letter from Will from Brindisi

Wednesday 17

Weather damp, much rain all this week.

Thursday 18

Maud much better and up for the first time. Allan carried her to the sofa. Allan and I walked out for biscuits.

Saturday 20

Returned to London at midday. John and Louie dined here.

[MAC’s daughter Louisa and her husband John Edwin Hilary Skinner, war correspondent]

Sunday 21

Went to church at (?). Wet afternoon. Met Harriet Henvey there. She looks pale, the climate of India appears to have told upon her.

[Harriet Henvey née Pyne who seems to have been an unhappy person. Her sister Edith Pyne married MAC’s son Ayrton Chaplin]

Tuesday 23

Wrote to Edward, to Mrs Wallace, to Emma on her mother's death. Went to Mrs Pyne’s in the afternoon, saw there the three children of Mrs Henvey, two of Mrs E Grenfell’s one of Mrs J. Grenfell’s, the latter interested me the most. Nelly Taylor was there, the most engaging child of the party. Called at Louie’s after dinner -- saw Cleve. Letters from Mattie and Allan and Mrs Rawlings.

[Edward was MAC’s brother Edward Nugent Ayrton. Emma née Althof was his German wife. The three children of Mrs Harriet Henvey née Pyne at that time were William (5), Margaret (4) and Frederick (2). The wives of the Grenfell brothers, Edward and John, were née Alice Pyne (29) and Sophia Pyne (28), sisters of Harriet and Edith. The child that interested MAC most was Bernard Pyne Grenfell (3) who later became Professor of Papyrology at Queen's College Oxford. Who was Mrs Wallace?]

Wednesday 24

Wrote to Allan and Ayrton, called on Mrs Evegard and brought Cleve home. Weather persistently wet. Read the Tichbourne case -- the Reverend Watson who killed his wife in perhaps an attack of delirium -- was reprieved on account of previous good conduct – I should (?) preferred the former reason but it is a good augury for doing away with capital punishment. Many a one has been hanged whose previous character was good.

[Allan and Ayrton two of MAC’s sons, Cleve was her daughter Louisa’s son – who was Mrs Evegard?]

Thursday 25

Came to 5 York Street in partnership with Louie and John. Julia and Cleve with us. Ayrton came late at night unexpectedly as we had not received his telegram.

[What does the first sentence mean? Did MAC live there, share it with them? See 31 May.]

Friday 26

Went to Highgate. Ellen much the same. Little Nellie well and very playful, returned home in the evening.

Saturday 27

Walked with Cleve in the morning -- in the afternoon took him to Effie's and to Mr Celli’s then to Kensington Gardens Square to fetch our things. Cleve very much admired by Lady Rowley and a Russian gentleman. Letter from Emma.

[MAC was very fond of Louisa’s son John Allan Cleveland Skinner and often looked after him. Effie née Skinner was the wife of her eldest son Holroyd. Mr Celli probably French, mentioned frequently in the diaries. It seems that MAC’s house was in Kensington Gardens Square?]

Sunday 28

Went to hear Mr Davies. A good sermon on the creation, the Book of Genesis being the lesson for the day. Man's nature to investigate the beginning of things - also on the (?) of the whole world.

Monday 29

Day wet and gloomy as it has been for some weeks. Julia took Cleve to Highgate. Allan called: just returned from Brighton. Went with him to 34 Manchester Square to see Maud. Holroyd, Effie and Miss Skinner dined here. Letter from Henry Hinton, he is doing well.

[A press cutting here: The city of Schamachi, in the Caucasus, was yesterday totally destroyed by a succession of earthquakes. Few houses remain standing, and many lives have been lost.]
[Maud Chaplin née Skinner had only been married to Allan Chaplin for a month. Could 34 Manchester Sq have been the London home of her father Allan Maclean Skinner? But see also Ashley House! William Ayrton and his new wife Matilda were also living there briefly at this time, but from the entry above it seems that it was not MAC’s house. Miss Skinner may have been Marianne Skinner (71), sister of Allan Maclean Skinner. Henry Hinton had married Elizabeth Boulton, MAC’s cook, in 1870.]

Tuesday 30

Maud and Allan dined with us. Cleve waited on us, called himself "the tiny waiter" and enjoyed his new calling.

Wednesday 31

Went to Kent Terrace to see Edith and Ursula with Julia and Cleve, called on Hugh Smith’s. Cleve went out with children. Wrote to Mattie, Mrs Skinner, H Hinton.

[Edith née Pyne (27), wife of MAC’s second son, Ayrton, and Ursula (3) her daughter. Who were Hugh Smith, H Hinton?]

February

Thursday 1

Mrs Nelson and Pauline called here. Mrs and Miss Russell Skinner called. Holroyd and Effie, Edward Feild and Josephine. Wrote to Will. Cleve at home with cough.

[There were several Russell Skinners and Russell Morland Skinners. Who were Mrs Nelson and Pauline? Edward Feild was a son of MAC’s husband’s sister Ann.]

Friday 2

Edith with Ursula came to lunch here -- little Nellie Taylor with Mary Adshead -- Children of two years old with as varied character as they will have through life. Maud and Allan came to dinner.

[Little Nellie Taylor was daughter of John Taylor and Ellen née Feild, daughter of Ann née Chaplin. Mary Adshead married John Taylor after Ellen’s death]

Saturday 3

Received box from Henry Hinton. Called on Florance at Ashley house, May with her, looking very pretty. Then on to Miss Shurr who looked amiable and cheerful in manner at 94 years old. Expressed much pleasure at Cleve's visit -- his brightness had delighted her as much as his beauty.

[Florance Steward née Skinner, sister of MAC’s daughters-in-law, and Florance May (6) her daughter, who became a nun. Where was Ashley House, and was it the home of the Steward family or of Allan Maclean Skinner? Miss Shurr (or her younger sister 14 years her junior, see 22 July) had taught MAC in 1821, when MAC was 13 years old.]

Sunday 4

Went to Christchurch, in the afternoon called: Edward and Charlie, Maud and Allan, Miss Skinner, Florance and May -- and Acton -- and Holroyd and Effie.

[Miss Skinner was probably Marianne Skinner, sister of Allan Maclean Skinner, who died at 5 Ashley Place in 1885. Ashley Place is near the RC Cathedral, Victoria Street. Could 5 Ashley Street be Ashley House? Charlie Celli was a friend of MAC’s brother Edward. He was possibly French. Edward had a German wife, had travelled ‘systematically’ in Europe, was a linguist and an enthusiast for decimal coinage.]

Monday 5

Dined at Holroyd's with Edith and Ayrton who had just come from Looe.

Tuesday 6

Called on Mrs Whichcote. Ayrton went to Stow Upland. Went with Maud Allan and Louie to the Court Theatre, saw a pretty little piece on the first part of Nicholas Nickleby, Miss Squeers and Tilda Price very well played (?) good comedy.

[MAC’s son Ayrton was moving from being Rector of Looe to become Vicar of Stow Upland in Suffolk. Who was Mrs Whichcote?]

Wednesday 7

Florance, Carry, Mr and Mrs Acton came in the evening. Florance singing delightfully.

[Who were Mr and Mrs Acton? One of MAC’s sons was called Acton Smee Ayrton. Smee was the married name of MAC’s mother’s half-sister. Acton Chaplin of Aylesbury was a brother of a Miss Chaplin of Devonshire who MAC’s mother knew at school, he provided his name to Acton Smee Ayrton and also became his godfather.]

Friday 9

Edith went to Stow Upland with Ursula

Saturday 10

I took Cleve and May to the Kensington Museum -- both much pleased, Cleve explaining things to May had behind him three or four less instructed than himself, listening earnestly and amused.

[Florance May Steward, who became a nun, would have been about 6 years old at this time, and John Alan Cleveland Skinner was about 7 years old]

Sunday 11

Went to Christchurch. Allan and Maud dined here.

Monday 12

Dined with Holroyd. Florance returned to Cropthorne.

Tuesday 13

Effie dined here. Holroyd at "The Lemon(?)"

Wednesday 14

Holroyd dined here, Effie at the Carrs’. John Taylor brought Ellen and the child in a carriage with Mary Adshead.

[John Taylor was the husband of Ellen née Feild, whose mother Ann (née Chaplin) was a sister of MAC’s husband John Clarke Chaplin]

Friday 16

Called on Effie. Wrote to Frederick, sent him copy of Louie's memorandum of Emma's attack of illness.

[Frederick Ayrton, one of MAC’s brothers, was sent a note on his sister-in-law’s illness]

Saturday 17

Fetched my watch from Bracebridge. Called on Mrs Henvey and Mrs Nelson. Wrote to Mattie and Ayrton.

[Mrs Henvey, wife of Frederick Henvey, was born Harriett Pyne. Mrs Nelson was perhaps not a relation.]

Thursday 22

Mme Celli dined with us.

Saturday 24

I dined at Holroyd's. Acton called to offer tickets for St. Pauls (Thanksgiving Service).

Sunday 25

Called on Mrs Nelson

Monday 26

Called on Mrs Nelson. Effie called. Holroyd called. Edward M Celli called, gave them tickets for the procession on the Holborn Viaduct. Maud dined with us.

Tuesday 27

Went to the Thanksgiving Service at St. Paul’s for the recovery of the Prince of Wales. A fine impressive affair, and apt to stir the spirit of a poet. All was well arranged within and without. We went fearing possible crowding, much earlier than necessary. Allan and Maud, Julia and I in the North Transept. Holroyd and Effie, John and Louie in the South Transept. Cleve saw the procession from Stanhope Gate Lodge.

[Press cutting describing the ceremony in St Paul’s is tucked into the page:
In December 1871 the heir to the throne, Edward Prince of Wales (Bertie), later King Edward VII, fell ill with typhoid fever, and for several days he was at the doors of death. On December 13th, on the eve of the anniversary of Prince Albert's death, everybody feared the worse, but on the 14th Bertie showed a light improvement and 24 hours later he showed clear signs of having overcome the illness.
On February 27 1872 a Thanksgiving service was held in St.Paul's Cathedral for Bertie's recovery. It was the first time since Prince Albert’s death ten years earlier that Queen Victoria had appeared in public. Both, the Queen and her heir were acclaimed by the crowd. The Prince's illness had helped to recover the Royal family's popularity, and now nobody thought about republicanism.]

Wednesday 28

Went in the afternoon with Julia Louie and Cleve to see the decorated streets and horses all along the route of the Prince and Queen to and from St. Paul’s -- a pretty floral decoration across Oxford Street by Mudie's Library. The grand arch at the bottom of Ludgate Hill pretty. Saw the Ellen Taylor husband and child near Temple Bar. Knocking at the knocker there seemed an announcement to all ages and classes. We observed them while waiting to pass on.

[Ellen Taylor, daughter of MAC’s husband’s sister Ann née Chaplin]

Thursday 29

Weather wet after bright weather during the festive days. Saltwells called. Walked out with Cleve, called on Maud.

March

Friday 1

Little Nellie Taylor came. I took her and Cleve to see Georgina -- Miss Adshead lunched here, reported Ellen not so well.

[Ellen Taylor, daughter of John Taylor and Ellen née Feild, daughter of Ann née Chaplin, sister of John Clarke Chaplin, father of MAC]

Saturday 2

Went to see Effie. Maud came to lunch. Letter from Ayrton telling me that the people at Looe had recognised his efforts to improve education there by presenting him with a silver salver.

[ Try the local library for information]

Friday 8

Jackson called and told me he had left Edward. Called on Mrs Law whose son is ill for which reason she is in London – saw the new neighbourhood of Redcliffe W Broughton.

[Who was Jackson, Mrs Law? Where is Redcliffe W Broughton?]

Sunday 10

Allan and Maud, Holroyd and Effie dined here. I heard Donald Fraser preach most eloquently at the Scotch Church. Acton called in the evening.

Monday 11

Received a letter from Frederick concerning Edward and Emma. Called on Holroyd in the evening.

Tuesday 12

Went with Allan and Maud to see ‘The last days of Pompeii’. My attention was so attracted by the display of scenery dress and decoration that I had not much to spare for the play and hardly saw the succeeding piece. Black Eyed Susan a most touching melodrama with much sweet writing in it, was well acted. This piece is full of real life and the hero was well done. Wrote to Frederick.

Wednesday 13

Went to Allan in the morning to help them. At 1/2 past 4pm they left for Southampton. What a difference it made to me in parting with him, that he was one with Maud, as I felt how she will while she lives love and cherish him and more than supply a mother's care and love -- how different it might have been had he been less good. They were to sleep at Southampton and M A Skinner to meet Maud and return to town with her.

[Allan on his way to India, his leave finished – he wrote from Burma in 1873. M A Skinner is a mystery - the only M A Skinner was born in 1770]

Thursday 14

A letter from Ayrton enclosing one from Mr Cole saying they were going to present him with a testimonial at Looe -- no parson there yet. Holroyd and Effie dined here. Parkes Willy too ill to come. Edward called. Maud returned from Southampton.

[Rev. Parkes Willy was the husband of Anna Cordelia Skinner, a daughter of Allan Maclean Skinner. Edward, MAC’s brother, must have got better, or a bit better]

Friday 15

Letter from Allan enclosing one to Edward and Mattie. Went to see Maud at Ashley House. Louie and Cleve went to Highgate to stay a week. Julia went to see Ellen, thought her weaker.

[MAC’s brother was Edward, his son William Edward being married to MAC’s daughter Mattie. William Edward was in Japan at this time, so perhaps the letter was for Will’s father and Will’s wife.]

Saturday 16

Maud came to lunch

Sunday 17

Went to St. Mary's Bryanston Square. Sermon for Girls’ School parson mentioned incidentally that haystacks stood on that spot 47 years ago. Acton called and Edward Feild.

[Edward Feild was John Clarke Chaplin’s nephew. So Bryanston Sq was still farmland in 1825]

Monday 18

Went to Highgate and took little Arthur Grenfell. Cleve(?) pleased to see us and met Arthur warmly calling him the "aged (?)" Ellen much the same and amused with watching the children. A young Viennese lady Miss Altman came from a school at Blackheath.

[Arthur Pascoe Grenfell died at Wells mental hospital and his cousin Bernard died in Perth mental hospital, yet both had good careers it seems. Ellen was very likely Ellen Feild, daughter of John Clarke Chaplin’s sister Ann and wife of John Taylor so no direct relation of MAC. ]

Tuesday 19

Went to Westminster and to Brompton to call on Nortons and Mrs Law who is in London for her son's health to consult doctors. Miss Altman better.

[None of these a relation I think.]

Wednesday 20

Went to “Charity Organisation Meeting.” Martineau’s speech stood out in relief from the matter of fact style of others. Miss Altman better. Lionel Macpherson befriends her and Mrs Pyne assists him.

[MAC’s son Ayrton’s wife was Edith née Pyne, and Mrs Pyne was probably her mother, Harriet née James, whose grandfather had been headmaster of Rugby]

Thursday 21

I went to Highgate, such a heavy cloud darkened the air that we were obliged to have candles at 12 o'clock then snow fell until it was three or four inches deep on the path -- but presently the sun shone and some went to London. Cleve and I went to Ellen. Returned with him at 7 when the snow was crisp and the moon bright: cold frosty night. The German lady left us.

[Who lived at Highgate? Perhaps Louie and John Edward Hilary Skinner, but see 13 July]

Friday 22

Louie returned to Highgate. More snow. I returned to London, wrote to Will.

Saturday 23

Snow all morning. Went out in afternoon, very wet thawing fast -- called on Mrs Nelson. Holroyd and Effie dined with us. Wrote to Mattie.

Sunday 24

Went to St. Mary's, heard Dr Jowell preach. Acton called also Edward Feild and C. Celli took a walk to Palace Gardens. Very cold.

Monday 25

Went to Highgate to see Louie and Cleve. Called on Mrs Knight -- did not see her but Miss Williams. Saw Ellen -- much the same. Returned at 7 p.m., very cold ground at Highgate covered with snow. Letter from Mattie and Will.

Tuesday 26

Cold. Julia went to Highgate. I went to Red Lion Street to get Julia's watch.

Wednesday 27

Holroyd and Effie came to breakfast. Went to Ashley house to see Florance who was in town for a short time.

Thursday 28

Louie returned from Highgate with Cleve. Rained the whole day.

Sunday 31st (Easter day)

At Christ Church

April

Monday 1

At 21 Westbourne Park Villas. Weather very wet. Professor Maurice died.

[Holroyd lived at 21 Westbourne Park Villas]

[Tucked into this page is a press cutting quoting a tribute paid to Professor Maurice as a man of peace, by Dean Stanley in a sermon at Westminster Abbey.]

[Another press cutting dated London, Monday, April 1, begins as follows:
"All Europe may well look this morning towards the little country of Holland and thank her for reminding Civilisation of the debt which is for ever due to her sturdy children.…….. three hundred years ago, Brill was taken by the "Beggars of the Sea;" and that same bold exploit was the real beginning of the long war in which, by desperate valour, by dogged endurance, and terrible sufferings, the Lowlanders at last wrested their freedom from Spain, and won a grand and complete victory for the Reformed Faith and for liberty of conscience. Men forget too easily; and, without wishing to perpetuate religious animosity, it is certain that Holland performs a duty to herself and to humanity in celebrating today the tercentenary of that gallant stroke, the capture of Brill.
Let us recall briefly the events of the critical time in question, that the least-informed may judge whether the Netherlanders are not fully warranted in making a grand commemoration of this occurrence. Philip II had succeeded Charles V as ruler of the Low Countries, which were at the period in question more valuable to Spain than Italy, Mexico, or Peru. Bigoted in faith, bitter in heart, hateful in disposition, cruel beyond all monarchs, the Spanish King had determined to crush Protestantism out of his Dutch provinces "by the fire, the pit, and the sword." It was better, he publicly said, "not to reign at all than to reign over heretics;" and the engines of Papist persecution were accordingly set in motion to extricate the very name of the Reformation from the land. But the Dutchmen were not of the stuff which easily yields to priests and Princes in the matter of conscience and right; they showed a spirit which made Granvelle and Margaret hesitate to carry out Philips hideous commands ……..
Our English Government should at this juncture have aged Holland. Philip had already tried to have Queen Elizabeth assassinated; and the quarrel of the Dutchmen was that of liberty, of rational religion, and human progress. But the gallant race was left alone, while the horrible massacre of St. Bartholomew wrought by Charles of France very soon showed that no help would come from their neighbours…….
It was in the very year when (the Duke of) Alva’s executioners were busiest with rope, stake, and axe -- the very year when the gutters of Paris ran with Huguenot blood, and the feeble Charles was screaming "kill, kill," and shooting men and women out of his window -- that this brave deed at Brill turned the scale. A company of fugitives equipped a fleet of "scows" and "schoets," and, proudly calling themselves "Guex de Mer," or "Beggars of the Sea," they attacked Brill on the first April 1572, after a most glorious piece of amphibious fighting drove Alva’s spearmen out of the town, and made it irrevocably their own. Let those who wish to know why the Dutch keep so great a national holiday to-day read the full story of that gallant deed; how the sturdy water-dogs took the ditches neck-deep, waded the flats, and made a battle-field of the mud and ooze to get at the murderers of their brothers and sisters.
When Holland heard of that splendid beginning, she rose with a cry of glorious unanimity; aided by Zealand, she defied and even attacked th bloody ALVA; she made every dyke a fortress, every village a citadel. Haarlem, defended principally by Dutch women, kept the whiskered Dons at bay for full seven months; Leyden – fiercely assaulted, and decimated internally by famine and pestilence – was saved by the sea, which was let in over the “polders,” and which, like the familiar and friendly ally that it was, brought ships, provisions, and safety. ALVA, who, as he himself boasted, had massacred on the scaffold or in prison eighteen thousand men, women, and children, began to find that blood could never quench the spirit of the obstinate Lowland………]

Thursday 4

Mrs and Miss Norton called

Friday 5

Professor Maurice buried at Highgate

Saturday 6

Went to Westbourne Park Villas

Sunday 7

John took Cleve to Sydenham -- I went to Mr Davies’s Church, (he) spoke eloquently of Maurice's death and of his character. Holroyd dined with us.

[Cleve was 7. Was school at Sydenham?]

Monday 8

Letter from Allan which I took to Maud at Ashley House

Wednesday 10

Maud came to stay with us. I called on Mrs Pyne. J. Sharpe, Edward F., E Cole and Acton spent the evening with us. Maud sang nicely with much feeling. Edward F. and Sharp played piano and violin.

Thursday 11

Dined at the Nortons’, very kind as usual. Louisa Norton played remarkably well on the piano. Maud sang with great taste and feeling as usual.

Friday 12

Maud left us. Holroyd dined with us.

Saturday 13

Called on Mrs Barbara Lodge who is in town -- also on Mrs Nelson. Evegard children came to tea. Effie returned from Croyde, Baby ill.

[Croyde, Bideford Bay, was where Mrs Caroline Emily Skinner lived.]

Monday 15

Effie’s Baby very ill with measles

Tuesday 16

Went to Holroyd's

Wednesday 17

Maud Kate and Henry came to luncheon

[Who was Henry? Could be Ayrton’s son but more likely Henry Allan Holden Steward]

Thursday 18

Went to Holroyd's

Friday 19

Went to see baby -- better

Saturday 20

Went to see Holroyd's baby, found him better.

Sunday 21

At home all day with bad cold. Cleve walked alone to Portman Square.

Monday 22

Came to Stow Upland, found Edith and Ursula well. The cottage very well situated.

Tuesday 23

Walked into Stowmarket with Ursula and servant. Holroyd went to Paris

Wednesday 24

Weather cloudy and cold. Mrs Cookson called. Letter from Frederick.

Thursday 25

Ayrton returned from London with Mrs Chambers and her son accompanied by his dog and a ferret -- he over 12 wanted his mother to sleep with him so they went to the hotel for the night.

Friday 26

Edith taken ill. Mrs Chambers left at one o'clock. Little girl born at 3.20 very like Ursula, a healthy child. Edith well through bearing well what pain she had. No nurse to be had, so washed the baby etc.

[Birth of Audrey Chaplin, grandmother of Ann Mendell née Gregory]

Saturday 27

Edith and child who has not yet opened her eyes, doing well

Sunday 28

Went to church with E Chambers. Lost our way and arrived very tired at the end of the Litany. Ayrton’s sermon much improved.

Monday 29

With Edith, all going on well and baby opened her eyes which seemed not to bear the light well. Walked into Stowmarket.

Tuesday 30

Walked into Stowmarket, received letter from Mattie.


May

Thursday 2

Baby and Edith well. Went to Stowmarket market day.

Friday 3

Weather cold

Saturday 4

Went to Stowmarket. Met Mrs (?) Barney. Edith and babe going on well. Wrote to Mattie

Sunday 5

Went to church in the afternoon. Ayrton preached to a full church etc. -- very well and fervently.

Monday 6

Edith and babe going on very well. Weather cold, did not go out. Had a cold. Letter from Holroyd

Tuesday 7

Not very well, no letters. A thunderstorm and the air chilly.

Thursday 9

Weather remarkably cold

Friday 10

Much rain and cold

Saturday 18

E Chambers went home

Sun 19

Went to afternoon church

Monday 20

Ayrton went to London thence with Mrs Chambers and boy to Llandudno. Weather fine and warm.

Tuesday 21

Edith came downstairs.

Friday 24

Left Stow Upland, came to York Street (or square?). Florrie, Holroyd, Effie, Kate & Miss Skinner came in the evening. F. sang charmingly.

[Did she live at York Street? From Sunday 26 it seems that Kate was Katherine Westby née Skinner, mother of Bryda and daughter of Allan Maclean Skinner. Miss Skinner was probably her aunt, Marianne Skinner]

Saturday 25

Ottie and Henry came and went out with Cleve. Julia Louie John and Cleve left at midday for Hamburg and Lubeck. I came to Holroyd.

[Henry was Henry Allan Holden Steward, and Ottie his brother]

Sunday 26

Went to church at St. Stephens, into the afternoon to Bonomis, all well and genial as usual. Called on Mrs Harcourt Slade. On our return Florrie Miss Skinner Kate Westby C Feild and Charlie Celli came in and stayed late.


Monday 27

At home all morning. Afternoon went with Effie to the Carrs. Effie's portrait like -- but gives the impression of a totally different person.

Tuesday 28

Called on the Pynes to lunch. Afterwards went to Highgate to see poor Ellen who is certainly worse -- such a contrast to her sweet child so full of fun and life. Returned at ten o'clock.

Wednesday 29

Went to Royal Academy early, a pretty little picture by Emma Squire. Glorious landscapes by V Cole and portraits by Millais. Called on Mrs Whichcote and on Miss Shurrs. Miss L S is wonderfully well and the elder sister over 95 well though confined by her accident. Edward dined here. Letters from Julia and Louie at Lubeck -- and from Mattie.

Thursday 30

Went in the morning with Holroyd, got a perambulator for little Allan Nugent. Wrote letters in the afternoon to Julia and Louie. Holroyd dined out.

[Allan Nugent, known always as Nugent Chaplin, Holroyd’s oldest son]

Friday 31

Called on Florance and on Alice Barnwell in York Street, home to luncheon then to call on Mrs Nelson, Mrs Pyne, Mrs Evegard. Left London at 9 pm via Southampton and Havre for Paris -- good passage -- found Mattie well. Many evidences of war just outside the walls and we came very quickly over.

[Mattie was studying in Paris]

June

Saturday 1

The temporary railway bridge; some railway sheds quite riddled by shot. The Tuileries a ruin except the tower next the Seine which is uninjured. The Ministère des affaires etrangères much damaged.

Sunday 2

Walked in the afternoon in the Luxembourg with Mattie and little Joseph, went into the gallery -- beautiful picture by Muller of the "days of la Terreur” in 1792, pretty metal statue of a troubadour by…... Wrote to Julia.

[Who was little Joseph?]

Monday 3

Walked with Mattie to see Mme Nuymen(?). Paris looks much less gay than in former times. Saw from the steamer on the river sad memorials of the days of the Commune. Posted letter to Julia.

Tuesday 4

Walked with Miss Barker to the Panthéon to look at a monument to Bonrepaire, Napoleon’s first general, who shot himself rather than give up Verdun to the Prussians -- but could not find it -- went to St Etienne de Mont, chanced on the monumental inscription to Blaise Pascal. Wrote to Ayrton. Went to Theatre Daudeville to see Sardain’s(?) play of Ra?dgas(?)-- a caricature of the French (?) of themselves.

Wednesday 5

Walked to Hotel de Ville, a sad and beautiful ruin. I did not expect that I could have been affected as I was by it. Consoled myself by looking at pretty things in shop windows. Posted letters to Ayrton and Holroyd

Thursday 6

Maud left England to join Allan. Walked with Mlle Henriette to Louvre. Beautiful objects of art in Salle d’(?), a less interesting collection of pictures than ours. A great storm about 10.30 pm. I wonder if Maud felt it!

[Where was Maud going, to join Allan? Must have been India?]

Friday 7

Went to see Comtesse de Broc -- who with the Count seems to live in the lap of luxury. She gladly welcomed an English friend. Walked home by Champs Elysées -- not many people about. Where can all the Paris beau monde and bas monde be? Surely all cannot have been (?) out by revolution. Wrote to Mrs Rollings and Holroyd.

Saturday 8

I walked with Mattie into the old part of Paris. Reading Carlysle's history a similarity in idea between this revolution and that but how much improved are the people. Air cool for this month. Cannot always sit with windows open.

Sunday 9

Letter from Mrs Skinner of Maud's departure. Went to the Oratoire with Mr and Mrs Barker afterwards to see the ruined Tuileries. A slight wire drawn across three yards from the building prevents the people going in. The centre part is I think the oldest, is the least ruined except the new tower next the Seine where the fire did not extend. The people enjoy the hitherto private gardens. Lovely beds of roses but not much flower gardening. The view from the centre of palace very fine. Such a coup d’oeil of two miles extent, not to be matched.

Monday 10

Went to Jardins des Plantes -- while looking at monkeys crowd driven under trees by violent tropical rain. Letter from Julia and Louie and Cleve.

[It seems that Julia and Louie did a lot of things together, especially when John was away. They were the two oldest sisters, followed by three boys, so no doubt they had to collaborate a good deal when they were children!]

Tuesday 11

Rain all morning Mme de la Voye called. Went to see Palais des Beaux Arts. Answered Julia's letter and posted it.

Wednesday 12

At home morning. Evening at Mme de la Voye’s. Wrote to Maud at Suez.

Thursday 13

Went to exhibition of modern pictures and sculpture. Boat too full to take in all who were waiting so walked there, found long queue waiting to get in - appointed to meet Mattie at picture 40. Enquired for same -- answer – “Oh, mais les a tous changé,” so wandered around looking at pictures. Mattie and I met at a charming bronze of a child with cock which he had tied to his little cannon and it has flown at him, child evidently shrieking - by Cecioni a Florentine. Wrote and posted letter to Holroyd. Letters from Louie and Cleve, also from Edith.

Friday 14

Went to read in Luxembourg Gardens, afterwards with Mattie to Bon Marché, a great shop like Schoolbred’s(?) to buy black grenadine – dearer than in London.

Saturday 15

Walked with Annie Barker to Bon Marché and down R. du Bac. Wrote letter to Edith and posted it.

Sunday 16

Went with Mattie, Mrs Archer and Barker to vespers at Notre Dame. Received letter from Julia and posted letter to her enclosing one from Mattie.

Monday 17

Went to Luxembourg Gardens in the afternoon to read, met Mattie there. Evening to Mme de la Voye. Met there M. (?) the etymologist, and two Ladies.

Tuesday 18

Went to the Beaux Arts to see De la Roche's fine picture of the Different schools of Painters in Europe, then to the Louvre to see the Limoge enamel china and Claude Lorraine’s landscapes, met with the original of Edith's picture the Infante Marguerite by Velasquez, saw a lady making a very good copy of (?) St. Paul. Mme de Broc called, did not see her. Received Spectator from Holroyd

Wednesday 19

Weather intensely hot (?) 14? in sun, 81 in shade. Read in Gardens -- storm rose about 4 - violent rain -- thunder and lightning -- finished reading Meunier d’Angibault (?) fine descriptions of scenery and character and worthy aim of the author to promote (?) purity and philanthropy.

Thursday 20

Walked with Mattie. Sent books for Cleve and letters to Holroyd, Mrs Skinner, Ayrton and Allan. In the evening with Mademoiselle Henriette and Annie to see Roi Carotte. Mattie with us. Mise en scène very good, - too long for Opera Bouffe -- from 7.30 to 12 o'clock. Enough to make two pieces. Letter from Louie.

Friday 21

Reading in the morning. A liberal Protestant French clergyman M.Grose breakfasted here with his wife (a cousin of Madame’s). Walked in the afternoon. Wrote to Edward.

Saturday 22

Walked all morning. Went to see Gobelins tapestry -- good for wall decoration. Letter from Julia.

Sunday 23

Went with Mattie Miss Barr and Joseph to St Cloud. Gardens very pretty in the French style and the Chateau a ruin which may be very picturesque 30 or 40 years hence. Very interesting today, remembering that the French themselves destroyed it for an idea. All very tired.

Monday 24

Mattie heard from Will who was detained at Truncomalce. Wrote to Mme Celli and Holroyd.

Tuesday 25

Went to the annual exhibition of pictures with Mattie. The French excel in painting young children -- perhaps because these live more with their parents than do ours. Wrote to Julia and Cleve. Letters from Holroyd and Edith.

Wednesday 26

Did not go out. Wrote to Mrs Wallis with Wills letter to Edward. Not well. Reading George Sand’s "Petite Tadette". Very pretty.

[Mrs Wallis, perhaps a neighbour or friend of Edward Ayrton who kept an eye on him?]

Thursday 27

Not well -- did not go out. Received money from bank.

Friday 28

Agnes baby (boy) is born at Dunstable. Went to R.de Bac to buy black silk, everything at high prices. Wrote to bank. Maud at Suez.

[Maud was on her way to India, see 16 August. Agnes Nugent Ayrton was daughter of Frederick Ayrton, so was MAC’s niece. Her son was Frederick, the future Bishop Nugent Hicks of Lincoln Cathedral]

Saturday 29

Working -- went out. Finished in George Sand’s "Petite Tadette," quite a poem of rural life -- improbable but sufficiently possible to be very readable, full of sketches of nature. Story of twins so resembling that an ideal similarity or tie of nature suggests the situation. La Tadette a moral Joan of Arques

Sunday 30

Wrote to Ellen and Agnes. Letter from Louie. Went to Jardin des Plantes with Joseph.

July

Monday 1

Walked to Maison Cluny to buy some black satin, dearer than in London.

Tuesday 2

At home working all morning. Posted letter to Louie. Called with Mattie on Mrs Woolley in the evening. Reading "Les Maitres Sonneurs" by G. Sand -- tale of life in Bourbonnais

Wednesday 3

Out before breakfast. Working all day. Walked to Quais Desaix. Letter from Allan dated 7 June

[Allan was in India. Three weeks to get a letter to Paris]

Friday 5

(?) working. Letter from Agnes about herself and baby, all going on well. Weather hot.

Saturday 6

Walked with Mattie.

Sunday 7

Wrote to Julia with copies of Mrs Wallis’s letter and Sankey’s opinion and sent Agnes’s letter. Received letter from Julia. Mattie went to Charenton.

Monday 8

Worked in the morning. Walked to R.du Bac. Mme Laurent Mme Kergonard’s sister died here. Reading "Les Maitres Sonneurs" by Georges Sand.

Tuesday 9

At work in the morning. Walked with Joseph to Palais Royal. Wrote to Frederick. Received letter from Louie announcing .....

Wednesday 10

Went with Mattie to look at and buy china in the Paradis(?), R St Denis.

Thursday 11

Wrote to Effie. Walked with Mademoiselle Henriette to look at their new apartments. Brought books at Hachettes. Mattie dined at Dr Roget’s.

Friday 12

Mattie passed the examination. Walked to R du Bac.

Saturday 13

Left Paris at 7.30 am. -- travelled via Calais and Dover, reached London at 5.30 (no trouble about luggage) at Charing Cross station -- drove to 21 Westbourne Park Villas. Holroyd and Effie at Highgate. Slept there.

[In 1871, according to the Census, Holroyd was at 21 Westbourne Park Villas.]

Sunday 14

Mattie went to see Mme Celli. I went to Mrs Pyne’s, all out -- went to Trinity Church.

Monday 15

Found lodgings at 118 Queens Road -- moved there. Holroyd and Effie returned. Letters from Edith and Louie. Went to see Holroyd and Effie, baby well and grown. Wrote to Ayrton.

Tuesday 16

Went to International Exhibition -- French artists in excellent taste. Wrote to Mrs Skinner, to Mme Kergonard.

Wednesday 17

Looked at house in Princes Square, went to see Mme Celli.

Thursday 18

Effie called, looked at house. Called on Mrs Pyne, saw Mrs Henvey. Heard of Arthur Dixon’s death.. Charlie came to tea, Effie to dinner. Letter from Ayrton.

Friday 19

Walked. Wrote to Allan. The little Henveys came to tea. Dined at Holroyd's. Read Middlemarch.

Saturday 20

Called on Josephine, Mrs Nelson. Dined at Holroyd's. Letter from Julia.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen’s Church, Rowsell preached. Called on Holroyd and Effie. Heat very great.

Monday 22

Heat intense -- storm and heavy rain cooled the air. Called on Mrs L. Shurr who was 80 on 4th of June. She looks pretty and about 60, a man might fall in love with her I think. Letter from Allan saying vessel containing Maud had stuck in Suez Canal.

Tuesday 23

Went to Industrial Exhibition with Mattie. The tunnel on the King's Cross and Farringdon Street line so filled with water by the storm that the trains could not pass through. Heat intense. Average 88 in the shade.

Wednesday 24

To Highgate found myself at Kentish Town, returned to King's Cross then on so passed a hot tedious two hours -- found Ellen worse -- no sensation from her thighs down to her to toes and face much altered – saw J Taylor and Miss Adshead. Storm impending but I got home before it broke.

Thursday 25

Secured lodgings next door for ….. Julia Louie John and Cleve who arrived from Travenmunde via Hamburgh dined with us. Effie came in the evening.

Friday 26

Walked with Cleve in the morning. Went to Kensington Gardens in the afternoon with Louie Wallis and Cleve who wanted much to see the Albert Memorial.

Saturday 27

Went to Holroyd directly after breakfast about apartment agreement. Spent the afternoon in Kensington Gardens, examined with Cleve some of the (?) on Albert memorial.

Sunday 28

Went to Bayswater Church. Effie and baby came.

Monday 29

Took Cleve and Willy Henvey to see the clever performance of Marionettes at St. James’s Hall.

Wednesday 31

Walked with Louie at Highgate. Alice Grenfell called. Cleve dined with Acton. The Edinburgh University adgudged to give the ladies their degrees.

August

Thursday 1

Took Cleve to Highgate. On my return found Urle had arrived. Louie dined here. Went to Holroyd’s in the evening.

Friday 2

Went to Effie's. Letter from Agnes. Josephine called. Wrote to Edward and Mrs Wallis to Edith.

Saturday 3

Holroyd and Effie went to stay with (?). I came with Cleve to take care of Holroyd's house.

Sunday 4

Did not go to Church. Weather dank. Walked in Kensington Gardens in the afternoon.

Monday 5

Public holiday -- in consequence of which we had a gentle fast -- as the retail as well as wholesale shops and offices were closed after two o'clock. Louie here most part of the day. At Holroyd's.

Tuesday 6

Went to see Mattie and Will and Julia. Mrs Nelson and Miss Dardis called. Went to Mrs Pyne's with Cleve. A note from Holroyd -- Livingstones letter to Granville published.

[This is the first mention of Mattie and Will together since Will left the UK early in 1870.]

[A press cutting is included from the Daily News, Monday July 29, 1872: Letter from Dr Livingstone: we are indebted to the courtesy of the New York Herald for the following letter, which appeared in that paper on Saturday:

South Eastern Central Africa, February, 1872
My dear Sir,
I wish to say a little about the slave trade in eastern Africa. It is not a very inviting subject and to some I may appear as supposing your readers to be very much akin to the old lady who relished her paper for neither births deaths nor marriages, but for good, racy, bloody murders. I am, however, far from fond of the horrible -- often wished I could forget the scenes I have seen, and certainly never tried to inflict on others the sorrow which being a witness of "man's inhumanity to man" has often entailed on myself.
Some of your readers know that about five years ago I undertook, at the instigation of my very dear old friend, Sir Roderick Murchison, Bart, the task of examining the watershed of South Central Africa. The work had a charm for my mind, because the dividing line between North and South was unknown, and a fit object for exploration. Having a work in hand, I at first recommended another for the task; but, on his declining to go without a handsome salary and something to fall back on afterwards, I agreed to go myself and was encouraged by Sir Roderick, saying, in his warm, jovial manner, "You will be the real discover of the sources of the Nile." I thought that two years would be sufficient to go from the coast inland across the head of Lake Nyassa to the watershed, wherever that might be, and after examination, tried to begin a benevolent mission with some tribe on the slope reach to the coast. Had I known all the time, toil, hunger, hardships and worry involved in that precious water-parting, I might have preferred having my head shaved, and a blister put on it, to grappling with my good old friend's task. But, having taken up the burden, I could not bear to be beaten by it. I shall tell you a little about the progress made by-and-buy.
At present let me give you glimpse of the slave trade to which the search and discovery of most of the Nile fountains has brought me face-to-face. The whole traffic, whether on land or ocean, is a gross outrage of the common law of mankind. It is carried on from age to age, and, in addition to the untold evils its inflicts, it presents almost insurmountable obstacles to intercourse between the different portions of the human family. This open sore in the world is partly owing to human cupidity, and partly to ignorance of the more civilised of mankind of the blight which lights chiefly on the more degraded. Piracy on the high seas was once as common as slave-trading is now. But as it became thoroughly known the whole civilised world rose against it. In now trying to make the Eastern African slave trade better known to Americans, I indulge the hope that I am aiding on, though in a small degree, the good time coming yet when slavery as well as piracy shall be chased from the world.
Many have but a faint idea of the evils that trading in slaves inflicts on the victims and on the authors of the atrocities. Most people imagine that negroes, after being brutalised by a long course of servitude with but few of the ameliorating influences that elevate more favoured races, are fair average specimens of the African man. Our ideas are derived from the slaves of the West Coast, who have for ages been subjected to domestic bondage and all the depressing agencies of a most unhealthy climate. These have told most injuriously on their physical frames, while fraud and trade rum have ruined their moral natures. Not to discriminate the difference is monstrous injustice to the main body of the population living free in the interior under their own chiefs and laws - cultivating their own farms, catching the fish of their own rivers, or fighting bravely with the grand old denizens of the forests, which in more recent continents can only be reached in rocky strata or under perennial ice Winwoode Reade hit on the truth when he said the ancient Egyptian, with his large round black eyes, full luscious lips and somewhat depressed nose, is far nearer the typical negro than the West Coast African, who has been debased by the unhealthy land he lives in. Slaves generally -- and especially those on the West Coast, at Zanzibar and elsewhere -- are extremely ugly. I have no prejudice against their colour: indeed, anyone who lives long among them forgets that they are black, and feels that they are just fellow-man. But the low retreating forehead, prognathus jaws, lark heels, and other physical peculiarities common among slaves and West Coast Negroes, always awakens the same feelings of aversion as those with which we view specimens of the "Bill Sykes" and "bruiser" class in England. I would not utter a syllable calculated to press down either class more deeply in the mire in which they are already sunk. But I wish to point out that these are not typical Africans, any more than typical Englishman, and that the natives of nearly all the high lands of the interior of the continent are, as a rule, fair average specimens of humanity. I happened to be present when all the head men of the great chief Insama, who lives west of the south end of Tanganyika, had come together to make peace with certain Arabs who had burned their chief town, and I am certain one could not see more finely-formed intellectual heads in any assembly in London or Paris, and the faces and forms corresponded with the finely-shaped heads. Insama himself had been a sort of Napoleon for fighting and conquering in his younger days, was exactly like the ancient Assyrians sculptured on the Nineveh marbles as Nimrod and others; and he showed himself to be one of ourselves by habitually indulging in copious potations beer, called pombe, and had become what Nathaniel Hawthorne called "bulbous" below the ribs. I don't know where the phrase "bloated aristocracy" arose. It must be American, for I have had glimpses of a good many English noblemen, and Insama was the only specimen of a bloated aristocrat on whom I ever set my eyes.
Many of the women were very pretty, and, like all ladies, would have been much prettier if they had only let themselves alone. Fortunately, the dears could not change their charming black eyes, beautiful forehead and s, nicely rounded limbs, well-shaped forms and small hands and feet. But they must adorn themselves, and this they do -- oh, the hussies! -- by filing their splendid teeth to points like cats teeth. It was distressing, for it made their smile, which had so much power over us great he donkeys, like that of the crocodile. Ornaments are scarce. What would our ladies do, if they had none, but to pout and lecture us on "women's rights!" But these specimens of the fair sex make shift by adorning their fine, warm, brown skins, tattooing various pretty devices without colours, that besides purposes of beauty serve the heraldic uses of our Highland tartans. They are not black, but of a light, warm brown colour, and so very sisterly -- if I may use the new coinage -- it feels an injury done to oneself to see a bit of grass stuck through the cartilage of the nose, so as to bulge out the aloe nasi (wings of the nose of anatomists). Cazembe’s Queen – Moari a Ngombe by name -- would be esteemed a real beauty either in London, Paris, or New York, and yet she had a small hole through the cartilage near the tip of her fine slightly aqualine nose. But she had only filed one side of the two front of her superb snow-white teeth; and then what a laugh she had! Let those who wish to know go and see her carried to her farm in her pony phaeton, which is a sort of throne fastened on to very long polls, and carried by 12 stalwart citizens. If they take Punch’s motto for Cazembe, "Niggers don't require to be shot here," as their own, they may show themselves to be men; but, whether they do or not, Cazembe will show himself a man of sterling good sense.
Now these people, so like ourselves externally, have genuine human souls. Rua, a very large section of country north and west of Cazembe’s, but still in the same inland region, is peopled by men very like those of Insama and Cazembe. An Arab, Syde Bin Habib , went to trade in Rua two years ago, and as the Arabs usually do where the natives have no guns, , Syde Bin Habib’s elder brother carried matters with a high hand. The Rua men observed that the elder brother slept in a white tent, and, pitching their spears into it by night, killed him. As Moslems never forgive bloodshed, the younger brother forthwith ran amuck on all indiscriminately in a large district. Let it not be supposed that any of these people are like the American Indians -- insatiable bloodthirsty savages, who will not be reclaimed, or enter into terms of lasting friendship with fair-dealing strangers. Had the actual murderers being demanded, and a little time been granted, I feel morally certain, from many other instances among tribes who, like the Ba Rua, have not been spoilt by Arab traders, they would all have been given up. The chiefs of the country would, first of all, have specified the crime of which the elder brother was guilty and who had been led to avenge it. It is very likely that they would stipulate that no other should be punished than the actual perpetrator. Domestic slaves, acting under his orders, would be considered free from blame. I know of nothing that distinguishes the uncontaminated Africans from other degraded peoples more than their entire reasonableness and good sense. It is different after they have had wives, children, and relatives kidnapped; but that is more than human nature, civilised or savage, can bear. In the case in question, indiscriminate slaughter, capture, and plunder took place. A very large number of very fine young men were captured and secured in chains and wooden yokes.
I came near the party of Syde Bin Habib, close to the point where a huge vent in the mountains of Rua allows the escape of the great river Lualaba out of Lake Moero. And here I had for the first time an opportunity of observing the difference between slaves and freeman made captives. When fairly across Lualaba, , Syde thought his captives safe, and got rid of the trouble of attending to and watching the chained gangs by taking off both chains and yokes. All declared their joy and perfect willingness to follow Syde to the end of the world, or elsewhere; but next morning 22 made clear off to the mountains. Many more on seeing the broad Lualaba roll between them and the homes of their infancy, lost all heart and in three days eight of them died. They had no complaint but pain in the heart, and they pointed out its seat correctly; though many believe that the heart is situated underneath the top of the sternum or breast bone. This to me was the most starting death I ever sas. They evidently died of broken-heartedness, and the Arabs wondered, "seeing that they had plenty to eat." I saw others perish, particularly a very fine boy of ten or 12 years of age. When asked where he felt ill, he put his hand correctly and exactly over the heart. He was kindly carried, and as he breathed out his soul was laid gently on the side of the path. The captives were not unusually cruel. They were callous -- slaving had hardened their hearts. When Syde, who was an old friend of mine, crossed the Lualaba, he heard that I was in a village where a company of slave traders had been furiously assaulted for three days by justly incensed by Babeemba. I would not fight nor allow my people to fire if I saw them, because that the Babeemba had been especially kind to me. Syde senat a party of his own people to invite me to leave the village by night and come to him. He showed himself the opposite of hard-hearted; but slaving "hardens all within, and petrifies the feelings." It is bad for the victims, and ill for victimisers.
This is about half the letter]

Wednesday 7

Holroyd and Effie came home with baby -- left in the evening for Havre and Paris. Baby remains with me and Cleve -- he is the sweetest little nurse and calls himself "Papa Cleve." Baby delights in watching him about.

Thursday 8

Went with baby and Cleve. Cleve reading dramatically Macaulay’s Lays of Rome which dwelt so in his mind that when reading the life of Columbus which much interested him before, he said "You don't find a book so very interesting when you are wanting to read another book all the time -- though it is very pretty."

Friday 9

Walked with Baby in the morning, again in the afternoon. Enquired for apartments. Acton defended himself in the House against Dr Hooker of Kew. Report at length in the Times. Called on Louie and saw Mattie.

Saturday 10

Went three times to Queens Road. Mme Celli there in the evening.


Sunday 11

Cleve went to his mother in Queens Road. I went to St. Stephen’s -- at Louie’s in the evening. Miss Skinner came in the evening.

Monday 12

Louie and Cleve left at ten o'clock for Bristol to visit Miss Millington on the way to Mrs Skinner's. Went to house agent in Edgware Road. On way home, lost purse containing only 6 or 7 pence -- had taken £7 from it before I left home. Julia went to Mme Celli's in evening. Mrs Whichcote called.

Tuesday 13

Went to house agent's

Wednesday 14

Looked at houses. Julia went to Highgate. Ellen better. Letter from Louie about her journey to Bideford with Cleve.

Thursday 15

Looked at houses. Letter from Effie. Wrote to Mattie.

Friday 16

Went to see Miss Skinner, read part of letter from Maud beautifully expressing her first impressions of India, which account puts a real country and its customs vividly before me. Wrote to Allan.

Sunday 18

Went to St. Stephen’s church

Monday 19

Went to Highgate. Ellen better. Wrote to Mrs Spooner and Mrs Whichcote about Ayrton. Harriet Henvey confined with a girl.

Tuesday 20

Julia went to Highgate called on M Celli at her office at the French chapel. Miss Sullivan came in and told us that Miss Archer had come. Wrote to Mattie. Acton called -- told me that Emma had put her husband's affairs in Chancery.

[French chapel at Highgate? Worth investigating? Edward’s illnesss serious, since Emma had put his affairs in Chancery]

Wednesday 21

Miss Sullivan dined with me. Walked out with Miss Archer in the afternoon.

Thursday 22

Went to look at house in Garway(?) Road likely to suit Julia, returned from Highgate.

Sunday 25

Went to St. Stephens.

Monday 26

Ada Dixon in town ill, operated upon under chloroform.

[Ada Dixon was a daughter of Elizabeth Maria Dixon née James, sister of Harriet James, whose daughter Edith married MAC’s son Ayrton Chaplin].

Thursday 29

Called on Mr Henry Smith in Lansdowne Road -- saw an imbecile child who lives with them and is as happy as an imbecile can be made. Wrote to Louie and Effie at Jersey.

Friday 30

Walked to Mrs Pyne's -- saw little Bernard, an interesting child.

[Bernard – 3 yr old son of Alice née Pyne and John Grenfell. See 23 Jan and 18 March]

Saturday 31

Went to Kensington Gardens with Holroyd's baby -- he was much amused with the swans ducks and dogs and sociable with children. Letter from Ayrton.

[Holroyd’s baby was his eldest son Nugent, born 8 June 1871]

September

Sunday 1 to Saturday 7

At Holroyd's, taking care of baby

Sunday 8

Went to St. Stephens Church -- Mattie and Will came

Tuesday 10

Went with Holroyd's baby to Waterloo Station to send him to Haling Island. Dined with Holroyd. Took apartments with Julia at 130 Queens Road.

[It seems that MAC was between houses? Holroyd’s baby apparently got to Haling Island by magic – probably taken by one of the invisible people from below stairs!]

Saturday 14

Mattie and Will dined with us.

Sunday 15

Went to the iron church. Mattie and Will came in the evening.

Monday 16

Holroyd

Tuesday 17

Mattie dined with me at Holroyd's. Called on Mattie.

Wednesday 18

Wrote to Cleve a note for him to receive on his birthday -- Johnny has returned from Berlin whence he chronicled for the Daily News the doings of the three Emperors -- called with Holroyd and went on to Devon. Mrs Whichcote called.

[So John Edwin Hilary Skinner was known as Johnny!]

Thursday 19

Went to Highgate to see Ann who is staying with Ellen. Ellen much the same. Child very well. Will came to see me here about professorship at Glasgow.

[Ann Feild née Chaplin, sister of John Clarke Chaplin, was Ellen Taylor’s mother – see also 1 and 14 Feb and 18 March]

Friday 20

Received letter from Louie. Called on Mrs Whichcote. Wrote to Edward and to Mrs Wallace.

Saturday 21

Holroyd called. Received letter from Miss Archer. Extremely cold. Will Mattie and Holroyd dined with us.

Sunday 22

Went to French church. Holroyd dined with us.

Monday 23

Julia went to Highgate. Weather very cold.

Tuesday 24

Weather very wet and cold. Dined at Mrs Whichcote’s, met a pleasant young parson named Mann. Mrs W. subscribed to vicarage at Stowe Upland.

[NB: ‘Subscribed to vicarage’?]

Wednesday 25

Letter from Louie. Ann and Miss Adshead spent the day here. Walked with Ann to Mme Celli’s and after lunch to new house 60 Westbourne Park Road. Holroyd came to dinner. Reading "Life of Dickens." Mattie called.

[Whose new house – MAC’s or Ann Chaplin’s? I assume the former. She was at 21 Westbourne Park Villas (Holroyd’s house) on 1 and 4 April, and slept there on 13 July]

Thursday 26

Called on Mrs Thorne -- out. Called on Mrs Nelson, all in mourning for Colonel Nelson, her husband's brother.

Friday 27

Received letters from Mrs Wallis -- Edward better, also from Allan and Maud and Mrs Skinner. Wrote to Maud a long letter also a note to thank Mrs Wallis -- called on Burr about house. Holroyd went to Penshurst, Julia to dentist.

[Burr possibly a solicitor?]

Saturday 28

Called on Mrs Thorne, met Mattie there. Mrs T’s little girls grow very pretty, beautiful specimens of English girlhood. The little boys charming.

[Who was Mrs Thorne?]

Sunday 29

Went to the French Church -- Mme Celli and her two sons there. An eloquent sermon by Gaie, a young Swiss. Will and Mattie here to tea. Supper much laughing.

[Julia, Mattie and Ann all visited Mme Celli and Edward was a friend of Charlie Celli. What was the connection? The French Church was at Highgate, see 20 Aug]

Monday 30

Dined at Mattie's, talked of the proposal to Will to go to Japan.

[William Ayrton just back from India, and now about to go to Japan.]

October

Tuesday 1

Went to Holroyd's in the evening, he had a cold. Saw Edward there. Acton also.

Wednesday 2

Went to house in the morning. Julia went to Highgate, called on Mattie, went with her & Will to Mrs Nelson's. Julia met us there. Miss Nugent was there, she has grown very fat. Wrote to Agnes.

[House might have been 60 Westbourne Pk Rd? Miss Nugent is a puzzle. MAC’s daughter Julia’s husband was James Edward Nugent, but MAC would not have referred to one of Julia’s daughters as ‘Miss’. More likely to have been a sister of James Edward, but he had only brothers according to my research so far.]

Thursday 3

Letters from Louie and Kate Skinner. A severe storm. Rain quite tropical for a few minutes. Wrote about Rannes…(?) Lister for a servant. Called at Holroyd's.

Friday 4

Went to Holroyd's. Dined at Acton's -- met Ayrton there, and Holroyd.

Saturday 5

Wrote to Mrs Spooner and Louie. Went to Holroyd's expecting to see Effie and baby, but they had not arrived -- walked about.

Sunday 6

Went to the Iron Church. Will and Mattie dined here. Holroyd Effie and baby called. Charlie Celli & Edward supped with us.

Monday 7

Went to Debenhams -- called on Mrs Nelson, Evegards, Mrs Pyne's – Helen’s boys at Rugby with whooping cough -- Constance ill at Brighton. Mrs Pyne walked with me back.

Tuesday 8

Letters from Mrs Skinner, Louie. Called on Effie. Holroyd dined here. Read Middlemarch -- wonderful to delineation of character and analyses of life. Mental paintings, highly finished by a great genius -- should the book live it will be a fine history of the spirit of this age as well as of society. Went to see Mattie and to take her Middlemarch etc.

Thursday 10

Letter from Mrs Wallis. Wrote to her and to Mrs Law. Wrote to Acton. Ann spent the day here and went with Julia to see Miss L. Shurr. Edward dined here.

[Three Chaplin sisters were in Brompton Square at Miss Smith and the Misses Shurrs’ school: Ann was one, Louisa and Sarah probably the others.]

Friday 11

Letter from Allan. Went with Mattie to look for apartments in Finsbury Square, Devonshire and Spittal(?) Squares, then on to Old-Ford -- could not find anything to suit and very few apartments of any kind there. A note from Acton.

[Why was she looking for apartments in Finsbury Square?]

Saturday 12

Went with Julia to call on Mrs Whichcote. Looked into the Kensington Museum -- pretty miniature of Duchess of Devonshire reminded me of Florance. Mrs Pyne spent the evening with us.

Sunday 13

Went to the Iron Church -- good sermon, good singing.

Monday 14

Went to an office to find a servant -- not many to be found now. Holroyd came in the evening. Julia dined at Mme Celli's.

Tuesday 15

At home. All morning read Miss Jex Blake’s able arguments for the study of medicine as a profession for women. To St. Johns Wood for the character of a servant. Called at Effie's, baby well. Puzzled at his return home. Julia went to Mattie's.

Friday 18

Furniture moved from pantechnicon, where it had been for one year and three-quarters, to 60 Westbourne Park Road, have taken that house on lease for 7, 14, or 21 years. Very wet day. Louie and Cleve came back from Devonshire. Cleve slept at 130 Queens Road. Emily Loveday came at £16 a year, finds herself in tea and sugar.

[130 Queen’s Rd was Julia’s place - MAC’s temporary accommodation. I think Emily got tea and sugar on top of her wage.]


Saturday 19

Remainder of furniture moved. Louie and John at 60 Alexander Street. Cleve always calls it Alexandria Street.

Sunday 20

Went to see Mattie and Will in the E India Road, all new neighbourhood to me. Very wet, travelled by the train omnibus for the first time, went to St. Botolph’s Church

Monday 21

At 60 Westbourne Park Road, very much occupied arranging furniture. Cleve very happy playing alone nearly all day in the attic. Slept at Westbourne Park Road.

Tuesday 22

Much occupied. Julia came to Westbourne Park Road with all our belongings. Cleve slept here -- much amused with "Old Curiosity Shop" and acting the story.

Wednesday 23

Julia took Cleve to see panorama of route to India -- well painted -- occupied with house.

Thursday 24

Mrs Norton called

Friday 25

Louie and Cleve went to Newgate. Received letter from Allan.

Saturday 26

John came in and told us about play of Charles Ist then went to Margate. Occupied with house, got carpet down.

Sunday 27

Went to St. Stephen’s, fine sermon by Mr Rowsell. Mattie and Will dined and spent evening here. Holroyd and Effie and C Celli to tea. Mattie slept here.

Monday 28

Mattie left early for the dispensary. Much engaged all day. Mattie dined here. I went with them to the Lyceum to see Charles I, very pretty and most grand -- but did not come up to my expectation. The (?) are so fine that Shakespeare would have made a magnificent tragedy from them, but the first act is very sweet and at once engages an interest in the play and that interest is quite sustained to the end.

Wednesday 30

Intensely wet all day. Called on Effie. Julia went to Highgate. Received letter from Agnes.

Thursday 31

Walked to Burr's, occupied much with household matters. Johnny came from Margate. Louie and Cleve well, the latter going to school daily. Holroyd and Effie came in to tea. Wrote to Agnes.

November

Friday 1

Received letter from Allan and one from Mrs Skinner. Weather intensely wet. John breakfasted with us and returned to Margate.

Saturday 2

Effie called. Weather very wet. Went to Holroyd's. Wrote to Ann.

Sunday 3

Went to St. Stephen's. Henri & Charlie Celli came in the evening. Holroyd called.

Monday 4

Went to the opening of the Female Medical College, henceforth to be called the Obstetrical College. Ld Houghton(?) into the chair, address read by Dr Rou..(?). Mrs Dr Carlton of Boston spoke and Mattie made a debut, speaking quite to the purpose though nervous.

Tuesday 5

Raining all day. Letters from Allan, Louie.

Wednesday 6

Julia went to Highgate. Went to W(?)house, wrote to Louie. Went to Holroyd's to look to Baby -- he is backward in talking and walking but very observant and intelligent.

Thursday 7

Went in search of carpenter, busy unpacking books and trying to arrange them satisfactorily in large bookcase. Received letter from Florance. Weather finer than for some time past, warm and unseasonably mild. Went to 21 to see baby Allan.

Friday 8

Unpacking and arranging books. Wrote to Allan. Julia wrote to Maud. Holroyd called in the morning.

Saturday 9

Little Allan dined here for the first time, behaved with dignity and tried to feed himself. Went to see Miss Shurr. Miss L. rather feeble. Wrote to Mrs Skinner

Sunday 10

Went to St. Stephen's. Rowsell preached from Amos(?) -- Mattie and Will dined here. Holroyd and Effie came to tea. Mattie remained to sleep. Will returned home. Mattie very poorly with miscarriage. Mrs Anderson came to see her twice.

Tuesday 12

Mrs Anderson came to Mattie, going on well. Received letter from Frederick.

Wednesday 13

Weather very cold. Baby Nugent dined with us. Wrote to Frederick. Holroyd breakfasted with us. Wrote to Louie. Received letter from Edith, Mattie in bed -- better

Friday 15

Mattie better. Wrote to Allan. Dined with Mrs Pyne. Mary P decided to go to St. Thomas’s as Nursing Superintendent. Weather extremely stormy.

Saturday 16

Weather cold and damp. Will came to dinner. Mattie came downstairs. Decorated the garden with chrysanthemums called by the gardener " Zanthelmus" so he respectfully corrected me.

Sunday 17

Went to St. Stephen's. Edward came and Holroyd. Will did not come. Mattie better. Weather very wet.

Monday 18

Mattie returned home. Weather very wet. Wrote to Ayrton. Letter from Louie.

Tuesday 19

Slight promise of fine weather. Called on Mrs Nelson. Julia went to Highgate. Reading Gibbon -- what a charming style of writing. Expresses himself as only those do who are masters of the art of writing and of the subject on which they write. Clearly and (?)fley free from ostentation, pedantry.

Friday 22

Went to Mattie and Will. Mattie pretty well. They decided to leave East India Road.

Saturday 23

Mattie went to Edinburgh, called on Mrs Golding Bird and on Dora Greathead who is staying there; then to Georgina's -- saw her, Josephine and sweet little girl.

Sunday 24

Weather very wild. Went to St. Stephen's, fine sermon on the lesson of the day. Called on Mme Celli. Holroyd and Effie came in the evening.

Monday 25

Received letter from Louie. Card from Mattie (in Edinburgh). Intensely wet the whole day and unseasonably warm.

Tuesday 26

John came to London, arrived late having been to the debating society with Holroyd. Wrote to Mattie.

Wednesday 27

Received letter from Allan. Went with Mme Celli to the meeting of foreign governesses in K G(?) Square. M. (?) de la Harpe addressed them. I went with volunteers to (?). I wrote to Louie. Holroyd and Effie came in the evening. Most virulent attack upon Acton in the Daily News.

Thursday 28

J E H S. returned to Margate. Julia called on Mrs Nelson. Engaged in the house. Called at Effie's and shopped in the Grove.

Friday 29

Julia went to Highgate

Saturday 30

Ursula's birthday. Wet as usual. Will arrived late in the evening to sleep here. Went to church, a good short sermon for the day.

December

Sunday 1

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd called. Effie not well. Will left in the afternoon.

Monday 2

Received letters from Mattie and Louie. Went to Oxford Street, called on Pynes’. Saw Helen G. and little boys (looking delicate).

Tuesday 3

Effie went to Devon. Rained all day. Wrote to Louie.

Wednesday 4

Wrote to Edward, Mrs Wallis.

Thursday 5

Called on Mrs Norton with Julia. Wrote to Edith. Weather cold

Friday 6

Julia not well. Weather wet. Wrote to Mattie. Mary Pyne came to luncheon. Reading "Forster's life of Dickens".

Sunday 8

Went to St. Stephen's, Will dined here. Acton came on his return from Paris.

Monday 9

Received letter announcing the birth of Allan's first child -- boy with blue eyes. Charlie Celli dined here.

Tuesday 10

Went into the city to get a carpet, could not see one which I liked. Julia suffering from neuralgia or toothache.

Wednesday 11

Went again about carpet. Julia called -- reported Louie and Cleve well at Ramsgate. Spent the evening at Miss Shurrs. Miss L. 95 last March, quite cheerful and pleasant.

Thursday 12

Went to Highgate. Ellen much the same. Nellie sympathetic and pretty. Julia pretty well, assisting Mme Celli.

Friday 13

Wrote to Allan to congratulate on child's birth. Mme Celli came to lunch. Anna Willy and Miss Skinner to dinner. Read Middlemarch, a very fine analysis and exposition of character.

Saturday 14

Effie and Holroyd dined here. Will also -- he slept here. Lent Illustrated to Mattie

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen's. Rowsell had gone to Windsor to preach before the Queen. Will left us.

Monday 16

Edith and Ayrton came to London with the two little ones. Ayrton called here with Ursula. I was out, looking for a suitable carpet for my little room. Weather wet. Wrote to Mrs Rollings -- heard from Allan -- Maud going on well.

Tuesday 17

Weather very wet. Sad accounts of innundation's in low lying places. Went to Kent Terrace to see Ayrton Edith and children, little Audrey a charming baby.

Wednesday 18

Letter from Louie. Bought carpet. Called on Mrs Nelson -- all well.

Thursday 19

Edith, Ayrton and Ursula and Audrey came to early dinner, a deeply interesting family party -- children so good. Johnny came to dinner. Holroyd and Effie joined us in the evening. Called at Effie’s -- met Carry there. Weather still very wet.

Friday 20

Carry came. J E H S left me this morning for Margate. Wrote to Allan. Went with Carry to call on Edith and family at Kent Terrace. Heard Mr Rowsell advocate home missions in preference to foreign ones.

Saturday 21

Mattie came from Edinburgh to join her husband at Blackheath.

Monday 23

Went to spend the day with Mattie at Blackheath -- enjoyed much the air and view. Mattie very well.

Wednesday 25

Went to St. Stephen's with Julia. Holroyd and Effie... Ayrton and Ursula (Edith with her mother), Mattie and Will -- dined with us all well and happy. Ursula and Ayrton, Mattie and Will slept here.

Thursday 26

Ayrton and Will went to Bexhill, found Edward much better, Ayrton returned late from thence. Mattie took Ursula back and Edith Alice Ursula and Bernard called later. Julia went to the Agency office.

Friday 27

Ayrton left for Mrs Pyne's. Edith called.

Monday 30

Called on Mrs Nelson.

Tuesday 31

Allan's child born November 12. Julia went to Margate. Dined at Holroyd's. Received letter from Pat Stone to say that Lucy (once Job -- then Fielding) now Brenner, was at Birmingham.

Edith and Ayrton's baby Audrey born April 26
Agnes M Hicks boy (first) -- June 28
Harriet Henvey's fourth child, girl -- August 19

[Tucked inside the back cover are long press cuttings on the ‘Wild Fowl Protection Bill’ and
‘Zoology at the Royal Academy’.]

END

Diary, 1873

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1873. In this year she became 60, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 17 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

Devonshire butter – June 6th:
After milking, the milk stands in a somewhat deeper pan than I have usually seen it stand in – for 12 hours, or longer in winter. Then the milk, in the same pan, is placed on a stove at a gentle heat; in about three quarters of an hour the cream has a crinkled appearance, it is then set to cool, and in 8 or 10 hours in summer made into butter slices. The cream is skimmed off – the maker steeps her hands in water as hot as she can bear it, then into cold water, she turns over the then solid cream as if she were making pastry, pouring off any milk that comes from it; then pours cold water over it and turns it about again, pours off the water. This is repeated until the water poured off is pretty free from milk. The butter is then flattened against the bottom of the pan, and salt sprinkled on it; washed again; after, being rolled together; and then, dividing it into pounds or half pounds, dabbed hard again [with] a flat piece of wood with a handle at the back, which has been soaking all the time in cold water. This is held firmly in the left hand – the butter is thus got into shape. Devonshire cream is the cream skimmed off before being made into butter – in fact simmered cream.

January

Mattie’s address: Ko-gaku-rigou, Toranomon, Yedu

[Sometime in 1873 Mattie’s husband Will was appointed Professor of Physics and Telegraphy at the Imperial College of Engineering, Tokyo]

Wednesday 1

Julia went to Margate

[It seems that from September last year John and Louie had had a house at Margate, and that Julia went there to stay with them]

Sunday 5

Florrie and Kate called looking so radiant, but poor Florrie –

[Why ‘poor Florrie’?]

Tuesday 7

John brought Cleve to stay with me. Edith left with Ursula and baby for Stow upland, both are I fancy clever children: Ursula thoughtful, very quietly reflecting on all she sees.

[Ursula Chaplin being then just over 3 years old, her first cousin Cleve being seven]

Wednesday 8

Took Cleve to Miss Skinner’s to see Florrie and Kate, then to Mrs Whichcote’s whom he much amused with his pretty wit, and when asked if he could speak French said "a little" and then suddenly "oh Mama that reminds me I did not say my verb to you and then turning to Mrs Whichcote "can you tell me what cat always walks on two legs?" The Chat of Persia - his own riddle -- Then took him to the Albert Walk -- he was much struck by its vast size.

Thursday 9

Louis Napoleon*, ex-emperor of the French, died at Chiselhurst in Kent, born April 20th 1808. Cleve and I had early dinner at Mrs Pyne's -- called at the Evegards, weather very wet.

[*Napoleon III, also called (until 1852) LOUIS-NAPOLÉON, in full CHARLES-LOUIS-NAPOLÉON BONAPARTE nephew of Napoleon I, president of the Second Republic of France (1850-52), and then emperor of the French (1852-70). He gave his country two decades of prosperity under a stable, authoritarian government but finally led it to defeat in the Franco-German War (1870-71). He was the third son of Napoleon I's brother Louis Bonaparte, who was king of Holland from 1806 to 1810, and his wife, Hortense de Beauharnais Bonaparte, stepdaughter of Napoleon I.]

Friday 10

Went to Great Western Station to see Florrie and Kate off. Called with Cleve on Georgina. Cleve delighted with the contents of the first volume of Rollin's History. I lent it to him -- he was reading it eagerly.

Saturday 11

Called on Mme Celli. John took Cleve back to Margate. Julia returned home

Sunday 12

Will came in the evening, went with him to St George’s Hall to hear the Stabat Mater (as it appeared to me) not well done.

Wednesday 15

Went to London University, found that J. had passed. Looked at the collection of Reynolds, Gainsborough, Romney and other fine pictures at the Royal Academy. Napoleon lying in state dressed in the uniform he wore at Sedan, boots and all! An Egyptian mummy is poor compared to this absurdity. Sisters of Charity kneeling all the time in the attitude of prayer at his feet and a huge candle at each side of him.

[What had J passed?]

Thursday 16

Napoleon was buried at the Romanist chapel at Chiselhurst, his son aged 17 whom I reported like Charlie Celli at that age -- apparently much overcome by grief. Dined at Holroyd's, met Mr and Mrs Harry Holroyd, called on Miss L. Shurr.

Saturday 18

Holroyd went to Margate with John. Effie dined here.

Sunday 19

Holroyd at Margate, Effie and baby dined here. Will here.

Monday 20

Julia went to Highgate. I went to Wimbledon, saw Mr and Mrs Margetts and 4 younger children pleasant looking. Carry, Holroyd very agreeable. Miss H. much aged.

[The only earlier mention of Miss H (probably Sarah Holroyd) in the diary is on 22 July 1870. The entry also included a mention of the Pynes]

Thursday 23

Heard from India. I fear they will have trouble rearing the baby.

[Allan’s son Wyndham was born in November 1872 - in India]

Friday 24

Wrote to Allan. Worked at the drawroom(?) floor. Julia called on the Saltwells.

[Here is included a press cutting, undated and paper not named, about the funeral of The Rt Hon Edward George Bulwer Lytton, Baron Lytton of Knebworth in the county of Hertford, who died January 18th 1873, aged 67. Part of it reads:
The Chapel of St Edmund’s, where the body now reposes, has always been considered a semi-royal shrine; and Dean Stanley, in his work on the Abbey, says, “This chapel seems to have been regarded as of the next degree of sanctity to the Royal Chapel of St. Edward’s” (the Confessor’s). The names of the persons that lie [interred?] therein recall passages from our English history, some of which are so brilliantly described in the pages of the deceased novelist. Next to him is the tomb of Humphrey Bourchier, who figures in “The Last of the Barons,” and fell in the battle of Barnet. Around him lie Prince John, a son of Edward II.; Robert de Waldeby, Archbishop of York and tutor to Richard II; Nicholas Monck, Bishop of Hereford; Frances Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk; Edward Talbot; Earl of Shrewsbury; and that Lord Russell whose monument records that he was
Righte noble twyse by virtue and by birthe;
Of heaven lov’d and honoured on the earthe.
and, on the next page, another:
DEAN STANLEY AT CAMBRIDGE – CAMBRIDGE, SUNDAY EVENING
The Dean of Westminster preached before a very large congregation at the University Church this afternoon from Job xxviii, v. 7-8. The discourse bore upon the moral aspect of Christian theology, and was concluded by a graceful allusion to the late Dr Lushington, and to Professor Sedgwick, whose life hangs by a thread. The lives of these two venerable gentlemen were, said Dean Stanley, filled with burning enthusiasm for what was noblest and best in human kind, and the same humble and firm belief in what was holy, just and good, in the nature of God. Lives such as these confirmed his text.]

Saturday 25

Worked at floor, finished it.

Sunday 26

To St. Stephen's. J. went to church in the evening, no one came.

Monday 27

Called on Mrs Harry Holroyd. Received letter from Louie. Wrote to her. Julia dined at Mme Celli's.

[Mrs Harry Holroyd was probably Louisa, wife of Henry Holroyd, barrister, grandson of Sarah Holroyd née Chaplin, sister of Edward Chaplin (MAC’s father-in-law. Henry was about 53 but his wife was probably a lot younger for their marriage was in 1858]

Tuesday 28

Went to Oxford Street to buy Japanese paper curtains at 18/ a pair 9ft by 9ft 6in -- such a thing, paper curtains!!!

Wednesday 29

Johnny arrived in the evening, talking of Kkwa(?). Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 30

Received letters from Louie and from Will announcing offer to go to Japan. Wrote to Mattie. Will dined here. Holroyd came in the evening. J. went to evening party.

Friday 31

Florance, Kate and Miss Skinner dined here, brought little May who was ill with swollen gland. Julia went to Highgate. Letters from Allan. Weather cold. May slept here.

[Little May was Florance’s six year old daughter Florance May]

February

Saturday 1

Weather intensely cold with sleet and snow. Johnny took May back and returned to Margate. Called on Effie -- baby very well. Reading Zincke’s Egypt – a very improving volume.

Sunday 2

Holroyd called, also Clifton Curtis -- much snow. Will dined here -- talked of Japan, a promising scheme I think.

Monday 3

Julia translated Herr Althof's letter. Went out in the afternoon, snow on the ground but air pleasant and dry. Wrote to Louie.

[I have assumed up to now that Julia, so frequently mentioned, is MAC’s eldest daughter, born in 1837, so about 35 years old – she didn’t marry until 1886. But did she speak German? MAC’s niece Julia Ayrton probably did speak German, since her mother Emma, née Althof, was German, but according to Ayrton Chaplin’s annotation in Ann Mendell’s ‘Chaplin’ family book, that Julia Ayrton was only 6 years old in 1873. If she was born earlier this would help with another problem – the apparent 20 year gap between her date of birth and her brother’s date of birth]

Tuesday 4

At home all day. Very cold -- snow on the ground. Wrote to Edith.

Wednesday 5

Called at Ashley House, saw Florrie and Kate and Miss and Mr Skinner. Kate gave us tickets for Haymarket to see "The Wicked World," by Gilbert the artist -- very clever. We were a party of 12 -- Kate, Florrie, Effie and Holroyd, Mrs Davidson, Mr Skinner, Clifton, Henri Celli, and two Westbys. Clifton dined here - such a fog, we the cab driver could hardly find his way back.

[I think that Ashley House must have been Allan Maclean Skinner’s London home, so the first line above refers to him, his sister Marianne, and two daughters, Florance and Kate. Kate married Ashley Westby in 1876. Ashley House, near Westminster Cathedral, no longer exists.]

Thursday 6

Called on Mrs Nelson and Mrs Pyne, did not see her -- saw Miss James and Mr P. Wrote to Mrs Skinner.
[Miss James was probably Mary Anne James, and Mr P – Henry Pyne]

Saturday 8

At home all morning. Called at Effie's saw her father who had called here. Received note from Lucy. Reading Egypt under the Pharoahs and the Kl(?) -- very interesting.

[Effie’s father – Allan Maclean Skinner.]

Sunday 9

Kate and May came in the afternoon and slept at our house. Edward F came to tea

Monday 10

Lucy Bremner once Lucy Grel(?) our dear nurse came on her return from Australia where she went in 1851 with a husband very unworthy of her -- tho she has lost the pleasing beauty of her youth she has a presence and countenance quite above her birth, a sad clever countenance.

Tuesday 11

Received a telegram from J E H S. asking me to go to Margate as he has to go to Vienna for Daily News. Took Lucy to see Holroyd's child -- then came by train to Margate. Julia gone with Kate and May (?) and to Highgate. Found Louie and Cleve with colds.

[The reason for this request by J E H S becomes clear on the 22nd of the month.]

Wednesday 12

Both better. Weather very cold sea rough, wind NW (?).

Thursday 18

Cleve going to school daily.

Friday 14

Letter from Will with a very satisfactory report of his interview with the Japanese Ambassador.

Sunday 16

Went with Cleve to church, differ with the doctrine preached.

Monday 17

Cleve reading every evening for a short time with Atlas, Rollin's Ancient History then shutting and replacing the books literally flies about the room as lightly as a spirit making up his own history of Clearwell on the text of what he has read. When reading I observe he will turn many pages back now and then to refer just as an older person would, knowing exactly where to find what he wants, and I was surprised at his saying "how is this, they say Hannibal was 50 when he died -- and here (turns pages back) they say he lived to 49." He is also anxious to read all numbers of soldiers in armies correctly.


Wednesday 19

Letter from Allan on the way from Hashungabad [Hoshingabad or Hoshangabad - which?] to Trichinopoli suffering every misery from severe changes of weather on the journey. Wrote to him.

Thursday 20

Walked in the town with Cleve. Louie very well.

Friday 21

Walked into the town shopping for Louie. Received parcel from Julia. Cleve enchanted with an atlas of Holroyd's of the battles of the Romans -- and a classical dictionary with many woodcuts which I have given him. Louie very well.

Saturday 22

Louie’s baby girl born at 7:15 pm. Mrs Willie attended and all went on very well. The babe strong and well made. Telegraphed the event to Julia and wrote by same post to John and Mrs Skinner.

[The baby was Caroline Louisa Marianne Skinner. She married Mr Bickford-Smith in 1891.]

Sunday 23

Louie going on well. Cleve taken in to see his little sister, tears of joy occurring round his beautiful eyes and a sweet smile on his mouth gave to his face the loveliest loftiest expression one could imagine -- and would that I had had artistic power to transfer it to paper! To preserve it in any way! He said if he were its father instead of brother he could not love it more than he did -- if no one in the world liked the little darling he should "but everyone must love such a sweet little thing no one could hate a new baby who had never done any harm." In a few sentences he went far forward into the little ones life -- he always protecting loving and teaching his dear little sister.

Tuesday 25

Engaged much writing letters. Louie and child going on well.

Wednesday 26

Wrote to Maud and others. Ayrton and Edith thinking of going to Japan.

Friday 28

Received telegram to say Effie was taken ill last evening. Holroyd's second child, girl, born about eleven o'clock.

[My grandmother, Irene Kate Chaplin! – AR-J]

March

Saturday 1

Received telegram announcing birth of Effie's little girl at 11.30 last evening. Telegrams from John at St Petersburg.

Sunday 2

Went to afternoon church with Cleve and walked on the jetty.

Tuesday 4

Walked on the cliff in the afternoon with Cleve. Effie and Louie going on well

Wednesday 5

Louie on the sofa for the first time. Cleve went to the Willys. Sent Spectator to Allan. Long letter from Maud to Mrs S. about the journey to Trichinopoli.

[It is evident that Maud was in India. I have added to the Family tree that Wyndham was born in India.]

Thursday 6

Louie progressing. Weather stormy but bright.

Friday 7

Louie carried into the drawing room.

Sunday 9

Went to church in the afternoon with Cleve, called on Mrs Willy, saw her sweet little boy "Bertie."almost three years old, speaks perfectly with the prettiest voice.
[So it seems that Anna Cordelia Willy, née Skinner, sister of J E H S, lived in Margate at this time. Check 1881 census.]

Monday 10

Weather very stormy, walked out, not very well.

Tuesday 11

Julia came from London. Mrs Willy called.

[At this point is included a press report of part of a debate in the House of Commons on a Bill which ‘emancipates the University of Dublin from Trinity College and claims it for the whole Irish nation and their children’. It was opposed by the Conservative opposition and lost by a majority of three. Mr Gladstone said that it would be ‘laid aside for a moment’.]

Wednesday 12

Returned to London with Cleve. Weather cold. Went to see Effie and new baby. The upper part of the face resembles Louie's child. Dined in Crawford Street with Mattie and Will. Mattie had a note from Mr Stansfeld arranging about her presentation.

Thursday 13

Weather bad, walked in the ”Grove" with Cleve, bought him a hat. Difficult to find one large enough

Friday 14

Went early to Mattie -- to assist her to dress for the drawing room. The costume salmon pink under and grey train suited her. Then called on Mrs Nelson, Evegards and Pynes, - returned to Mattie, found Kate, Miss S, -- Florrie and B Wesby [or Wesley] waiting to see M -- who at half past five was glad to undress. I hope the presentation will be a good invention.

Saturday 15

At home. Went to see Effie.

Sunday 16

Went to St Stephen's with Cleve. Weather intensely cold. Miss Skinner brought May. Mattie dined here. Will came to tea. Holroyd joined us at supper when suddenly came in Mr and Mrs Wallace of Bexhill

Monday 17

Liberal Government resumed office. Disraeli unable to form a Tory one. I went with Mattie to purchase linen for Japan. Called on Effie found, her better.

Thursday 18

Mme Celli lunched here. Took Cleve and May to Kensington Museum -- he was much pleased with armour and begged May to examine "the gallant weapons" and then the ship models. Kate was here when we got home.

Saturday 22

Went with Cleve to see Lucy into the train to Margate. Called at Ashley House - then walked on the Thames Embankment to Charing X station - thence to Guildhall.

[Lucy presumably the former family nurse already mentioned above, now going to help Louie with her baby?]

Sunday 23

Went to St Stephen's with Holroyd and Cleve -- a wet morning. Will and Mattie dined here. C. Celli came in the evening. Will and Cleve called on Georgina. Mr Jay died.

Monday 24

Took Cleve to Westminster Abbey. Called on Mrs Norton and on Miss Shurrs - Miss S. is 96, 4th of this month, looking remarkably well.

Tuesday 25

May Steward came to stay here.

Friday 28

Took Cleve and May to the British Museum. He would not look at Roman antiquities but walked steadily through the Assyrian rooms and enquired of the official for the Carthaginian antiquities. May was pleased with the birds.

Saturday 29

The Oxford and Cambridge boat race, weather splendid. Cleve and May quite excited in favour of Cambridge. Mattie and Will came in the evening.

Sunday 30

Went to St Stephen's, walked in Kensington Gardens with the children.

[Was MAC still living at 60 Westbourne Pk Rd? The location of St Stephen’s might be a clue. Check it. Near Harrow Road (see below)?]

Monday 31

Kate came to fetch May. Weather mild and damp.

April

Tuesday 1

Cleve full of fun and April fools. Julia returned from Margate.

Wednesday 2

Went with Cleve to see Mrs Acton

Thursday 3

Dined at Mrs Pyne’s

Friday 4

Wrote to Allan. Called on Mattie.

Saturday 5

Mr Lenthall called. Holroyd left me and returned home to sleep. Weather cooler.

Sunday 6

Went to St Stephen's church. Walked with Cleve some distance up the Harrow Road. Kate, May, Miss Skinner and Captain Westby called -- wet evening.

[Captain Westby was the future husband of Kate Skinner – more than 15 years older than her.]

Monday 7

Took Cleve to Victoria Station to meet Kate, to return to Margate. The dear child was in an agony of grief at parting though delighted at the prospect of seeing his ‘(Dody)’ and his little sister. Called on Effie. Met Mme Celli and walked with her.

Wednesday 9

Effie and children went to Hasting.

[Maybe because the sea air might help a sick child. See entry for 15th]
.
Thursday 10

Mr Skinner and Kate dined here. Sent parcel by Whiteley’s to Maud. Holroyd went to Devonshire to see Mrs Skinner.

Friday 11

Not well. Edward called. Weather very cold dull and dry.

Saturday 12

Called on Mattie and Mrs Nelson.

Sunday 13 (Easter Day)

Went to St Stephen's. Mattie and Will dined here, walked with him to see Mme Celli. No Easter finery, all in winter costume save now and then a servant girl in gay attire.

Monday 14

Walked across the park to call on Mrs Whichcote. First warm weather.

Tuesday 15

Letter from Allan. Received a letter from Mrs Skinner saying that Effie's baby was dying, enclosed card from her to that effect. Went immediately to Hastings. Found baby pretty well. Returned home, called at Ashley House. Edith with Mrs Pyne and Ursula called in my absence. Weather warm.

Wednesday 16

Called on Mattie. Just returned from Bexhill. Edward better. Saw Octavia Saltwell. Mrs Nelson. Mrs Hollis very lady like sweet person all nonsense about aristocratic birth, she a baker's daughter, one of the best ladies I could find. Walked with Edith home. C. Celli called.

Friday 18

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 19

Dined at Mrs Pynes, met Mattie Merill, Helen Grenfell, Edith and Ayrton there.

Sunday 20

Went to St Stephen's. Julia went to the Pynes. Will and Mattie here.

Monday 21

Ayrton came with Ursula to stay here a few days.

Wednesday 23

Went to China sale in Regent Street

Friday 25

Ayrton went to Highgate with Ursula. Ellen much the same, at home all day with face ache

Saturday 26

Went with Mattie Merill to Regent Street, lunched with Mattie and went with her to see Miss Shurrs. Miss L. to give M an introduction to Lady Parkes who was their pupil. Mattie went to Nortons’. I came home.

Wednesday 30

Mr Perrey of Marden died.

May

Friday 2

Louie came to London with Cleve baby and Lucy. Baby suffering from vaccination. Mattie Merill dined here.

Saturday 3

With Mattie to buy wallpaper for Japan

Sunday 4

Mattie Merill lunched here

Monday 5

Mattie came about eight o'clock very tired, Will soon after. I took leave of her, coldly, I felt but a little less coldly I should have quite unnerved her and myself too. Hoped to forget my sorrow in sleep but could not sleep till daylight. Wrote to Mme Kergonard for Louie.

Tuesday 6

Will and Mattie left London at 7.30 am for Liverpool to sail in the Calabria to America for Japan via San Francisco. I walked with Cleve to their apartments to get letters and a box of preserved fruit from Frederick at Nice. Letter from him telling me of his serious illness.

Wednesday 7

Rain all afternoon

Thursday 8

Mrs Acton and Miss Sullivan lunched here. Louie and children with Lucy here. Received letter from Mme Kergonard -- she could not receive Louie.

[What a quick reply, if the letter was to France and back!]

Friday 9

Miss Adshead brought Nellie to dine here. Georgina, Anna and Kathleen came to tea. Mrs Whichcote called.

Saturday 10

Took Cleve to Westminster pier where we met Holroyd, who accompanied me to the Tower. Cleve took a most intelligent interest in all he saw. Louie dined here. Clifton called.

Sunday 11

Louie’s baby was baptised at St Stephen's Church by the names Catherine Louisa Mary Anne. Clifton Curtis and M A Skinner with Julia for Carry Skinner, sponsors. They took tea with me. Cleve like his father excitedly trying to amuse and please the guests. Lucy Brenner here with the infant -- Holroyd of the party. Effie and children at Hastings

Monday 12

Took Cleve to see St John's Gate and then to St Paul's -- where he saw a few monuments and then remained for afternoon prayers. Louie dined here

Wednesday 14

Dined with Louie. Miss James and Mr Skinner lunched here. Mrs E. Grenfell came in the afternoon. Effie and children returned from Hastings. Nugent looking very well and pretty baby thriving.

Thursday 15

Louie and little family started at 10am for Antwerp from the St Katherine's Wharf.

Friday 16

Went to Highgate. J Taylor and Miss Adshead taking a picnic together in Richmond Park. Weather rather cold but fine. Walked beside Ellen's chair to Muswell Hill. A lovely spot considering it is so near London. Holroyd came in the evening having his eye inflamed could not dine at Whichcotes with Effie.

[J Taylor’s first wife was Ellen Feild, daughter of Ann Chaplin and Samuel Feild. Ann Mendell wrote: “John Taylor worked for the British Museum and was involved with the move to South Kensington - Natural History I presume. They seem to have lived in Highgate, and MAC often goes to visit as does Julia. I do wonder what illness she (Ellen) had. After her death he marries Mary Adshead. They have 2 chilren, Dora and Harold. First child is Ellen like her mother. Seems to have been called Nellie”.]

Saturday 17

Mr Skinner called. Holroyd went to Bordman the occulist, eye better.

Sunday 18

To St Stephen's Church. Sermon for British Colombia missions. Acton called -- also Holroyd, Effie and C. Celli. E Feild dined here.

Monday 19

Went to Mudies and in search of coal office advertising cheap coal -- could not find it. Letter from Allan.

Tuesday 20

Telegram from J E H S from (?) - went to Ashley House. Called at Charing Cross for Allan, got him map of Chiva territory. Took parcel to Adie’s for Will. Mr Skinner, Charlie and Effie dined here. Went after dinner to Panorama of Overland to India.

Wednesday 21

Julia went to Highgate. Letter from J T groaning about income at Museum. Wrote to Mattie, sent letter also to Allan.

Thursday 22

Left London at 9.15 for Devonshire, arrived at Walland Carey at 8.20. Found Mrs Skinner better than I thought she could be often so much rheumatism. Only Carry and Clifton here.

Friday 23

Clifton left. Wrote, and sent a few primroses, the largest I have ever seen, to Julia. Walked with Carry through the woods towards the sea.

Saturday 24

Took a drive with Mrs Skinner through "The Hobby" a road cut in the wooded hill sloping down to the sea running round a coombe for two miles or more of continuous sylvan beauty.

Sunday 25

Went to the little Church of Buck's Cross, duty well performed. Clergyman Mr Kirman, a good man.

Monday 26

Weather cloudy. Went to see Mr Holderness’s school where Cleve went, a very fussy half educated but good man I think. Wrote to Julia.

Tuesday 27

Went with Carry to Buck's Mill, a picturesque lime mill close to the sea. A lovely walk, weather delightful, wind NW. Cold at night.

Wednesday 28

Letter from Julia. Went with Carry through the Hobby in a donkey cart -- and then on a donkey to "Gallantry bower" a magnificently wooded cliff 700 or 800 feet high in the grounds of Clovelly Court, the house of the Fanes.

Thursday 29

Letter from Cleve. Wrote to Mattie. Called on Mrs Kirwan, looked over interesting sketches of Cape and Mauritius. Walter Steward came. Reading Mrs Oliphant’s historical sketches of George 2nd’s time.

Friday 30

Wrote to Cleve and to Julia on a card. Walter and Clifton out for the day. Reading.

Saturday 31

Read Mrs Oliphant's sketches of musical persons of George 2nd’s time, walked and enjoyed the fine views. Letter from Julia.

June

Sunday 1 (Whit Sunday)

Went to Church with Clifton. Wet day. Letters from Julia and Holroyd. Wrote to Holroyd and Julia.

Monday 2

Fine day for the holiday folks. Read. Walked on the hills. Walter Steward left. Received letter from Agnes who has been ill.

Tuesday 3.

Walked. Read. Wrote to Mattie and Agnes. Arnold on the American war of 1780, a signal instance of valour and treachery arrangement with Clinton so to dispose his forces on West Point .that Clinton may have an easy victory.

Wednesday 4

Received first letters from Will and Mattie, just landed at New York. Letter from Louie, Mrs Curtis very ill, baby poorly but better. Lunched at Reverend Mr Kirwan's - drove in evening. Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 5

Wrote to Maud. Went to temperance meeting at Mr Holderness’s with Clifton. Sorry to see a movement which has much merit mixed up with so much silly ostentation and appealing so much to the lowest part of the character. 5 or 7 o'clock sat down to tea at 8 pence per head.

Friday 6

Nugent's birthday. Called on Mrs Kirwan. Saw Devonshire butter made. Left Walland Cary by post trap for Barnstaple, one old man was very sceptical about Good Temperism, said it wasn't right to deprive a man of his pint ‘o beer -- get him to pay 8 pence for his tea -- he should like to know who got the profit out of it all, there was a deal of skulking and Judasing somewheres - he won't say where.

Saturday 7

On to Exeter where I slept. Saw the cathedral in the morning -- small -- got to London at half past five. Went to Holroyd's -- Nugent's birthday party. Kate came to stay here with Lillian. Capt B Westby and Florrie dined here, all went to the Prince of Wales theatre

[This is odd. Kate married Capt Ashley George Westby. So did he have another first name beginning with B or a brother who was also a captain? It is always Florrie with him, yet he married Kate and Florrie was already married, to Walter Steward. Something wrong here]

Sunday 8

Went to Church at St Stephen's. Effie's Baby christened "Irene Kate." Colonel Basley, Josephine Blake and Kate Skinner sponsors, had tea at Holroyd's. Josephine came here.

Monday 9

Wrote to Mrs Skinner.

Tuesday 10

J E H. S arrived from Brussels. Louie Cleve and Babe well.

Thursday 12

Went to shops for Mrs Skinner, called on Mrs Nelson. Henry Hindley died at Jersey. Frederick came to London.

Friday 13

Wrote to Mattie. John Skinner went to Devon to see his mother. Kate staying here with Lilian. Heard of Henry Hindley’s death in the evening. Called on Miss L. Shurr.

Saturday 14

Called on Mrs Pyne. Wrote to Ayrton. Went with Kate, Julia and H. Celli to see French comedy and farce.

Sunday 15

Went to St Stephen's, a fine sermon on Christ's charge to his disciples. "Hospital" Sunday, £400 collected at that Church and £480 only at St Paul's, which was full from end to end. Went to Kew Gardens with Holroyd, Effie, boy and Lilian. Acton called.

Monday 16

Received letters from Ayrton and J E H S and Mrs S who liked the purchases. A note from Mr Badger telling me of poor Frederick's marriage and of his serious illness. Went to see him, very ill and suffering miserably, my heart aches to think of him. I fear medical treatment cannot cure him. Some French doctor bled and blistered him terribly at Vichy. Mrs Harlin called and Colonel Basley.

[‘Frederick’ in this entry is her brother (died 20 June), he married in 1833 and his wife is described below as ‘kind and attentive,’ so why the mention of his marriage?]

Tuesday 17

Went to see Frederick, still suffering, able to take only ice and turtle soup. His wife kind and attentive.

Wednesday 18

Frederick worse, breathing more difficult, and he very restless, appetite quite gone, always unable to lie down.

Thursday 19

The difficulty of breathing not quite so great but he is very restless, at twelve o'clock said he felt a little easier, enquired kindly after all when I left him; as he fancied he was better with only two in the room, his wife and valet. Mr Badger left him shortly before me.

Friday 20

At four o'clock this morning Mr Badger came to tell me Frederick was released from all his pain and misery at half past two -- he passed away quietly. I went to Arundel Gardens. His face still bore traces of suffering especially the eyebrows. J E H Skinner arrived. I wrote to Mattie

Monday 23

Received kind letters of sympathy from friends -- called on Mr Badger

Tuesday 24

Walked to Kensal Green, saw the grave that was to receive the body of my amiable affectionate generous-hearted brother -- it is North East of the chapel and near to it. Ayrton came from Stow upland.

Wednesday 25

Holroyd, Ayrton, J E H Skinner and Acton met here to attend the funeral. Mr Badger, Charles Hicks, the doctor and Lord Stanley of Alderley also attended. Ayrton returned home. Received letter from Mattie. Mrs Whichcote and Mr and Mrs Blacklock called.

Thursday 26

Went to Bexhill. Edward better. Got home late. Mrs Pyne called.

[At this point is inserted a press cutting headed VALUABLE BEQUEST TO THE BRITISH MUSEUM: “We are informed that Mr Frederick Ayrton, barrister-at-law and long resident at Cairo, who died in London last week, has bequeathed to the British Museum a splendid library of caligraphic writings in Arabic, Persian, and Turkish, collected during many years' residence in Egypt, and the market value of which probably exceeds £3000. Mr F. Ayrton was a perfect connoisseur in the Oriental science of caligraphy, of which so little is known, artistically, in Europe; and he devoted time and money, without stint, to this his favourite study. That fact alone enhances the value of his collection, which is, perhaps, unrivalled in Europe. The bequest is made on condition that the trustees set apart a room in the Museum for the exhibition of these specimens of Oriental caligraphy, and that Mr Ayrton's Arabic scribe, Asaád Effendy, be engaged for three or four years, at a salary of £100 per annum, to draw up a catalogue raisonnée of the contents of each series, the testor generously providing for the past services of his favourite Shaikh by a special legacy.]

Friday 27

Wrote to Allan. Called on Mrs Nelson. Mrs Norton called, also Mr Skinner and Carry. Letter from Louie

Saturday 28

Called on Mrs Harlin and saw her three children. The eldest, a girl of 5, looked hard at me, then embraced me with many kisses. Wrote to Louie and Ayrton.

Sunday 29

Went to St Stephen's. Acton, S. Feild and Edward called. Rained hard all afternoon so that they remained some time.

Monday 30

Called on Mrs Williams and Mrs Rollings in Queen Anne Street. Fred and Florance looked very ill. All genial and enquired after Mattie. Julia dined at Mme Celli's.

[Who are Fred and Florance?]

July

Tuesday 1

Went to Bracebridges. Wrote to Mattie.

Wednesday 2

Called on Carry Skinner, Mrs Dixon and Mrs Pyne.

[Mrs Dixon, wife of John Bond Dixon, was born Elizabeth Maria James, and was sister of Harriet James (Mrs Henry Pyne), Ayrton Chaplin’s mother-in-law.]

Thursday 3

Went with watch to Bracebridges. In the afternoon down Talbot Road. Letter from Miss Stephenson as to Agnes’s illness. Wrote to Agnes. Sent papers to Allan.

Friday 4

Working in the morning. Called on Miss L. Shurr. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 5

Called on Holroyd early and on Georgina. Received letters from Caroline, wrote to Emilia Ellis.

Sunday 6

Went to St Stephen's. Acton called and Mrs Dixon and (?). Holroyd, Effie and boy dined here.

Monday 7

Mrs Pyne called. Called on Mrs H. Holroyd, saw Mary Louisa Wickham, Frederick Wickham’s eldest daughter very like him

Tuesday 8

Received tickets from Mrs Rollings for Botanic Fete. Sent them to Mrs H. Holroyd. Went to Highgate, saw very picturesque ruins of the Alexandra Palace illuminated. Ellen not better. Mme Celli dined here.

Wednesday 9

Holroyd not well. Received tickets from Acton for Botanic Fete, took them to Mrs H. Holroyd -- found she had not received the first sent by post. Wrote to Secretary of Post Office about it. Julia left in the evening for Havre to join Louie at Etretat. Miss James called.

[Louisa Fanny Holroyd, Mary Anne James]

Thursday 10

Letter from Ann. Dined at Mrs Pyne's, met there Mrs A Grenfell. Letter from Allan. Wrote to Ann and Mattie.

Friday 11

Called on Mrs Henry Slade, Wyndham Place, - those old London houses have an unwholesome smell. Holroyd’s dog flew at me -- these big animals are dangerous to life. Posted letters to Mattie via America, also to Allan. Mrs Nelson and Pauline called.

Saturday 12

Went to see the water colours at Pall Mall, good things by Israel Hagler Bouvier Telb(?) and Warren in different styles. Then on to Mrs Whichcote who had a rough Scotch lady with her whose roughness made her wince a little. Holroyd went to Bexhill, all well. Received letter from Julia at Etretat.

Sunday 13

Went to St Stephen's, Mr Rowsell.vehement against the creeping in of Romanist doctrines. Wet all-day. Wrote to Julia and to Edith.

Monday 14

Wrote to Effie and Clifton. Walked to Notting Hill, looked at houses. Holroyd came in evening. Sent receipt for legacy. Weather cool.

Tuesday 15

At home all morning. Walked to house agents, looked for houses for Holroyd. He came in the evening.

Wednesday 16

Letters from Effie and Ayrton. Went to Royal Academy, met Edward F, Charlie and Mrs Norton. Stayed there until nearly seven o'clock. Mrs Whichcote called. Letter from Allan to Maud.

Thursday 17

Went to The Villas to see the Baby. Edward Feild and Holroyd dined with me. Sent newspaper to Allan (?) June with caricature of A in it. Weather cool and stormy.

[A being Acton]


Friday 18

Went to the International (poor), dined at Mrs Whichcote’s, met her Mrs Tatham and eldest girl, pretty, played well and talked unaffectedly.

Saturday 19

Wrote to Julia. Called on Mrs Nelson. Dined at Pynes’ with Holroyd, met Henveys -- Mary P Edith Constance and Ursula who was charming.

Sunday 20

To church at St Stephen's, a gent called who did not leave his name, thought it was Mr Badger so went there -- not he -- talked of intended monument to Frederick. Wrote to Mattie.

Monday 21

Went early to meet Edith at Royal Academy. Lunched at Mrs Pyne's, then went to see Florance Steward’s portrait at Leslie's house -- he has put the countenance at least one turn of it very fairly on canvas, but her colouring is wanting. Letter from Agnes asking me there. Posted letter to Mattie. Holroyd came in evening.

Tuesday 22

Went to Dunstable to see Agnes, found her looking ill and in bed. Baby Freddie a healthy child, well-developed in body and in mind, unusually intelligent, altogether a very charming child.

[Agnes, daughter of MAC’s brother Frederick. Her baby, Frederick Cyril Nugent Hicks, became Bishop of Lincoln. MAC was right about his intelligence. How could she tell, at under a month old?]

Wednesday 23

Dunstable a nice healthy Place, the garden very pretty in its flowery luxurious, the Irish yews along the border of the lawn very pretty. The house has a friendly homely aspect - perhaps with doctors as with parsons the master is of the household - not in at certain stated times -- this breaks all form - and the necessary irregularity at the doctors at once waives off all ceremony.

Thursday 24

Returned to London. Sorry to leave Agnes and dear child -- well-trained children are the angels of this world. Found various letters from Julia.

Friday 25

Having strained the muscle of my leg could not go out, so wrote letters all day, to Allan, Mrs Skinner and others. Mrs Pyne and Edith called in the evening. Holroyd dined with me.

Saturday 26

Worked, walked, wrote to Mattie. Received letter from Cleve boldly written and long, about the field of Waterloo. Charlie Celli called. Read Waverley.

Sunday 27

Edith came, went to St. Thomas’s. Constance Pyne dined here

Wednesday 30

Edith, Ursula, baby and nurse came to stay. Went with Edith to Bethnal Green Museum to see the fine collection of Sir R Wallace's pictures -- fine sketches and watercolours of horses crossing water by Decamps.

Thursday 31

Edward called

August

Saturday 2

To Kensington Museum with Edith and Ursula. Holroyd went to Colonel Bayley’s and to join Effie. Went to Kensall Green Cemetery with Edith and Ursula, enquired for a man to buy the big dog. Ada Dixon called -- Acton called to tea.

[Colonel Bayley – see file of letters ‘To_Effie’]

Sunday 3

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Mme Celli. Wrote to Louie.

Monday 4

Edith went to see Mary, - stayed at home with Ursula. Mrs Pyne dined here.

Tuesday 5

Edith, Audrey and nurse went to Shirley near Ashbourne. I walked with Ursula, tried to find the man to buy the dog. Rained heavenly.

Wednesday 6

Received letter from Ayrton asking me to go to Shirley soon -- so went to Pantechnicon there to sell dog. Wrote to Ayrton, Mrs Skinner and Effie. Nurse caught cold.

Thursday 7

Left by Midland Railway for Ashbourne, pretty road to Derby. Changed there for Rosceter, change again for Ashbourne. Ayrton met us – Ursie very glad to see him.

[Ayrton was presumably on holiday, perhaps a locum for the Vicar?]

Friday 8

Walked with Ayrton, Edith, Constance and children. Read that part of life of Ampère the man of science that relates to his and his wife's mutual love, so soon broken off by death. Servant rather rebellious about cooking venison.

Saturday 9

Walked with A, E, Constance and children. Worked. Acton resigned. Daily News silent on the subject.

[Find out more about Acton’s resignation – try index to Times for this month. He is about to become Judge Advocate General, see the press cutting below.]

Sunday 10

To Shirley church, a good sermon expressing the spirit of Christianity from Ayrton. Again in the evening, on the woman of Samaria.

Monday 11

Wrote to Mrs Whichcote, Octavia Saltwell, Mattie. Posted the letters at Ashbourne where we drove into the afternoon. Reading. Received letters from Louie and Holroyd.

Tuesday 12

Acton - Judge Advocate General.

Wednesday 13

Walked and wrote letters.

Thursday 14

Edith, Ayrton and Constance went to Dove Dale. Walked out with baby. Wrote to Allan and Octavia Saltwell.

Friday 15

Went to Buxton to see Octavia Saltwell with Mabel Tatham who met me at station -- drove to Duffield Station. Wrote to Louie. Wrote and sent cheque to J E H S at Liverpool. Returned Railway Scrip to Irving and Slade.

Saturday 16

Went to Public Gardens. Left Buxton the belle of Derbyshire with Octavia Saltwell and Mabel and got to Shirley at seven o'clock

[At this point a cutting from the Spectator of August 16, 1873:
"Mr Ayrton has, it is said, accepted the office of Judge-Advocate-General, and all the world is sneering at Mr Gladstone, who fills an office he intended to abolish with a man incompetent to perform its duties. We have always thought the abolition of the office just because the deputy was competent one of those hasty things governments sanction in an economical fit, and we can testify that there is no blunder as to the present selection. Probably no official in England is quite as competent to the office -- which might be made one of high importance if its holder could look straight in the eyes of the Duke of Cambridge -- as Mr Ayrton is. He must have every detail of it at his finger-ends. For years he was the fighting advocate of the Bombay Army, engaged in every court-martial, -- first, to defend the accused, and secondly, to make the lives of the ignorant officers who preside over those tribunals a perpetual burden to them. If he chooses to hold the office -- not yet certain -- he will in six months do more to smash up Horse-Guards abuses than all that the declaimers in the country. With the law behind him, Mr Ayrton is on military questions just the most formidable foe the unjust could have."]

Sunday 17

Went to church. After dinner walked with Octavia Saltwell in Ednaston Park. Church in evening.

Monday 18

Octavia Saltwell and Mabel Tatham left with Constance. Wrote to Edward. Letter from J E H S. Did not go out as it rained. Wrote to Holroyd.

Tuesday 19

Rained nearly all-day. Did not go out. Reading life of Grote, badly done by Mrs Grote. Letter from Mme de Molin(?) to Julia.

Wednesday 20

Received letters from Mattie, arrived at Japan, also from Holroyd, Julia, Louie and Cleve.

Thursday 21

Mrs Pyne, Constance, Ayrton and Edith went to Alton Towers. Walked with children through park. Wrote to Mattie, omitted number. Wrote to Cleve with Mattie's letters to J and L enclosed.

[Press cutting: Whitehall, August 21: “The Queen has been pleased to direct Letters Patent to be passed under the Great Seal granting the office and place of Advocate-General or Judge-Marshal of her Majesty's Forces to the Right Hon Acton Smee Ayrton -- Gazette.]

Friday 22

Reading life of G Grote, a fine character. Ayrton drove me and Mrs Pyne through the park passing through woods, a stifling unpleasant sensation.

Saturday 23

Went to Dove Dale with Ayrton, Edith, Mrs Pyne. Received letter from Mrs Nelson. Wrote to Miss L Shurr.

Sunday 24

Ayrton preached good sermons which by an ordinary preacher would be tediously spun out, by his brevity he secures the attention of the uneducated and uncritical.

Thursday 28

Left Shirley with Edith and Ursula, having travelled in five different trains, I parted with them at Rugby where they went to see Helen. I came on home and found Louie, Baby and Cleve. Baby much improved. Cleve rather thin. Julia and Louie well.

Friday 29

Louie and children went to Devonshire. Wrote to Allan.

Sat 30

I went to see a house for Mme Celli. Received a note from Agnes who is at Hereford Sq., en route for the seaside.

Sunday 31

Went with Julia to see Agnes who was in bed, her boy charming healthy and intelligent. Remained all day with her.

September

Monday 1

Went to Stowupland. Stopped to lunch at Colchester with Louisa Barton Lodge -- found her very ill in her room. Went with Mr Lodge to the Castle Museum, then on to Stowupland, pouring rain all-day - and in torrents when I arrived, but Ayrton met me at the station.

Tuesday 2

Went to see the new building and tried to lay out the grounds to advantage. Wrote to Mattie.

Wednesday 3

Letter from Mattie about Yedo and their new dwelling.

Thursday 4

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 6

Walked with Ayrton, Edith and Ursula across the meadows.

Sunday 7

Went to Stowupland Church, good sermon, rained in the afternoon.

Monday 8

Returned to London. Letter from Louie. Holroyd came in the evening having returned home last week (Monday).

Tuesday 9

Letter from Allan. Holroyd dined here. I went to see Miss Shurr, talked about Mrs Grote -- who she says has a fine generous nature. She gave me a Wedgwood Medallion of Charles Fox. Weather wet and cold.

[Charles James Fox: Britain's first foreign secretary (1782, 1783, 1806), a famous champion of liberty, whose career, on the face of it, was nevertheless one of almost unrelieved failure. He conducted against King George III a long and brilliant vendetta; for this reason he was almost always in political opposition and, in fact, held high office for less than a year altogether. He achieved only two important reforms, steering through Parliament a resolution pledging it to abolish the slave trade speedily and, in the 1792 Libel Act, restoring to juries their right to decide not merely whether an allegedly libellous article had, in fact, been published but also what constituted libel in any given case and whether or not a defendant was guilty of it.]

Wednesday 10

Charlie Celli and young de Molin(?) dined here. Holroyd came in the evening.

Thursday 11

Went to Hanway Street for frame to Medallion of Charles Fox. Effie and Nugent returned to London. Holroyd came late. Read Andersson’s book about Lions.

Friday 12

Received card from Louie. Received present from Allan. Wrote to Allan, card to Miss L. Shurr. Mrs F.Ayrton died at Margate.

[Mrs F Ayrton, - Margaret Hicks, mother of Agnes Nugent Hicks, née Ayrton. I assume that Agnes’s husband Dr Charles Hicks was a cousin, but I don’t have the connection.]

Saturday 13

Went to International. Heard lecture on cookery by Buckmaster who is not much educated but sufficiently enthusiastic to be very useful in teaching the people that there are more useful and economical ways of preparing food than roast and boiled.

Sunday 14

Received a note from Mr Badger telling me of the death of Mrs F Ayrton. Holroyd and Effie with Nugent dined here.

Monday 15

Went to International with Emily -- heard lectures on cookery which are profitable and economical, returned home to dinner.

Tuesday 16

Letter from Will and Mattie.

Wednesday 17

Mrs F Ayrton was buried. I called on Effie. Sent letter to Mattie via Southampton.

Thursday 18

Wrote to Mattie.

Friday 19

Wrote to Acton.

Saturday 20

Engaged in the house. Wrote to Mrs Nelson and Louie. De Molier called. Wrote to Mrs B. Lodge.

[This is the third mention of De Mol… I don’t think I have the spelling correctly.]

Sunday 21

Went to St Stephen’s, dined with Holroyd, called on Mme Celli.

Monday 22

Received pictures and magazine from Mattie and Will.

Tuesday 23

Looked for lodgings for Kate. Engaged in the house.

Wednesday 24

Engaged in the house. Mrs Pyne called with Harriett and Alice’s fine boys. Willie Henvey is a fine bold boy. Both seem clever but quite unlike. Sent newspaper to Mrs Nelson.

Thursday 25

Wrote to Mattie. Sent her "Scotsman" also newspaper to Allan. Called in Monmouth Road on Kate. While waiting her arrival Miss Skinner came, presently arrived Florrie and all her five fine children so pretty and graceful.

Friday 26

Went to Highgate. Ellen weaker.

Saturday 27

Louie Cleve and Carina with Lucy Brenner came from Mrs Skinner's having slept last night at Exeter. Mrs Harlin called

Sunday 28

Went to St Stephen's Church with Cleve. Louie’s children, Florrie's and Holroyd's all assembled at Holroyd's, looking lovely all together and enjoying their play in the garden with the Westbys. Florrie and children had tea with us. Went to the International with Ottie Henry and Cleve then to Kensington Museum. Louie dined with Holroyd. Acton came in the evening.

Tuesday 30

Received letter from Allan.

October

Wednesday 1

Ottie and Henry dined here and I took them and Cleve to see the panoramic pictures of the route across America to San Francisco -- very well (?). Boys had tea here. Met Effie much disturbed, had dropped her purse containing £8.

[A slip of paper inserted here, undated, part of a letter: …. Ursie was much interested today with the question of the doll’s loving, and reasoning there from what it was in us that loved, as the doll had a body as well as us, so we didn’t love with our bodies, and the doll had a head as well as us so we didn’t love with our heads – then what was it we loved with. She now comes very willingly to her reading. Ever yours, ..]

Thursday 2

Mrs Pyne came to lunch with Willie Henvey and Bernard Grenfell, the boys played with Ottie and Henry. Received letters from Will and Mattie. J E H S came in the evening. Sent newspapers to Allan and Mattie.

Friday 3

Ellen Taylor came from Highgate with Nellie and Miss Adshead. Kate, Florrie, Effie and all the children came to tea -- Ten children, from Ottie 9 years old to Carina and Irene seven months, who were laid on the floor kicking and now and then prettily caressed by those of two or three. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 4

Louie and Cleve left by early train for Margate. Lucy and baby followed in the evening.

Sunday 5

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd and Effie took tea here with Nugent. Called on Mme Celli.

Monday 6

At home working. Julia lunched at Mrs Pyne's. I dined there. Received note from Louie telling of their arrival at Margate. Called on the Evegards, heard of Cosmo Howard’s marriage.

Tuesday 7

Called at Kate's lodging.

Wednesday 8

Kate came, brought Lilian. Went to the Lyceum with Holroyd Kate and Effie to see Irving play Richelieu which he did well.

Thursday 9

Wrote to Mattie, walked with Lilian.

Friday 10

Lent newspaper to Allan. Went to see Miss L. Shurr. Miss Shurr not so well as usual. Julia went to Highgate. Florance came and took back with her little Lilian. Talked to J E H S across the lines at the Queens Road Station.

Saturday 11

Walked to Notting Hill, called on Mrs W. Knight and Mrs Lebèque-- and home. Ordered frame for medallion of C Fox. Holroyd came to breakfast. Sir J Landseer buried in St. Paul's Cathedral

Sunday 12

Holroyd went to Ireland. Rained all day. Effie and Nugent dined here. E Feild called.

Monday 13

Went with Julia to station for Birmingham, then called on Mrs Nelson, then on Pynes -- saw Harriett Henvey and her husband. Letters from Agnes, Louie and Allan.

Tuesday 14

Walked across Kensington Gardens, a lovely day -- called on Mrs Whichcote then walked to Ashley House. Florrie and all gone to Brighton. Effie dined here.

Wednesday 15

Went with Effie to Bauerle to see portrait he is painting of Effie and Nugent -- quite idealised both though of course resembling by no means exact portraits. Mr and Mrs May and child dined here and Nugent. Wrote to Louie and Julia and Ann F. Letter from Julia

Thursday 16

Went with Mrs Skinner to see the "The Happy Land." The fun is poor.

Friday 17

Received letter from Cleve and Louie, baby poorly. Dined at Mrs Pyne's, met Colonel Rawling who has just been to Paris, looked in at Bazame’s court martial, not many persons there. Wrote to Maud and to Allan. Wrote to Edith.

Saturday 18

Called at the bureau re Mme Celli. Went to Effie's. Letter from Julia, not well.

Sunday 19

Went to St. Stephen’s. Effie dined here. Harriett -- Frederick Henvey took tea here. Wrote a note to Julia, Read Carlyle’s latterday pamphlet.

Monday 20

Received letters from Anne, Mrs Rollings, Mattie -- dated September 2nd and 7th. Called on Mrs Nelson. Sent books to Edith.

Tuesday 21

Received letters from Allan -- Ayrton -- J E H S.

Thursday 23

Sent letter to Mattie. Went to Brighton to visit Agnes.

Tuesday 28

Received letters from Allan.

Thursday 30

Returned from Brighton with Agnes and her dear little boy. J E H S came to dinner and slept here.

Friday 31

Julia returned from Birmingham. J E H S returned to Margate. Wrote to Allan. Called on Agnes, out, saw baby.

November

Saturday 1

Dined with Acton, Agnes there. Called on Miss Shurr en route. Julia did not go. Mr and Mrs Goldring Bird called.

Sunday 2

Whether extremely wet, went to church. Agnes and Acton came in the evening, also E Feild

Monday 3

Letter from Allan. Maud very poorly. Mrs Thorne called. I called on the Saltwells and Mrs Nelson.

Tuesday 4

Received letters from Will and Mattie. Weather very wet. Called on Ann.

Wednesday 5

Mrs Pyne called about Ayrton while I was meditating on his letter to me. Telegraphed to him and went to Mrs P’s in the evening.

Thursday 6

Wrote to Mattie also to Edith with Mattie's letter to her. Wrote to Mrs S. Weather very wet.

Friday 7

Ann and S. Feild dined with us.

Saturday 8

Dined at Acton's with Julia. Holroyd and Effie dined there.

Sunday 9

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd Effie and child dined here -- very wet.

Monday 10

Wet all day. Called on Ann, ill with cold.

Tuesday 11

Bad cold. Julia went to Highgate. I went to School Agents for A. Received letters from India. Sent parcel of baby’s coats from J E H S. Hat etc from self to India.

Wednesday 12

Wrote to Ayrton and sent schools’ circular.

Thursday 13

Mr Skinner came to lunch. Mme Celli dined here. Received letter from Dr Drysdale to forward to Mattie. Called at 21 and brought Nugent to play here a little.

Friday 14

Wrote to Allan. Mr Skinner called. Julia called on Saltwells. Ellen Knight and her sisters called. Samuel Feild called and talked over the sad quarrel with J. Taylor. J E H S came late.

Saturday 15

Walked to Camden Hill to look at houses for H. Saw one like Mahomet’s coffin over the railway suspended in mid air, very little ground rent asked! Joseph (?) poor Frederick's valet called. Acton called. J E H S returned to Margate.

Sunday 16

Went to see Holroyd then to Ann’s in Queens Road -- with her to St. Stephen's Church. Ann came after dinner. W Clifford called.

Monday 17

Rode to Berners Street then walked to Mrs Nelson's and on to the Pynes to dinner. Talked over Ayrton's new arrangements. Received letter from Agnes reporting serious illness of her dear child. Wrote to her.

Tuesday 18

Received letters from Allan and Mattie, wrote to Louie, Florrie -- forwarded letters of Mattie’s to Agnes. Wrote to Dr Drysdale. Looked at houses for Holroyd. Called on Georgina. Ann called here. Wrote to Ayrton about schools.

Wednesday 19

Went to Mrs Pyne’s about letter from Ayrton.

Thursday 20

Wrote to Mattie and Will. Walked. to Kensington. Read Bressante. Mrs Whichcote called. Miss Sullivan came to lunch. Ann called.

Friday 21

Julia lunched at the Pynes. I went to Highgate. Ellen losing the use of her hands. Little Nellie sang prettily. I stayed late to see John Taylor hoping I might arrange the quarrel between him and his father in law.

Saturday 22

Called on Samuel and Ann to try and make peace but could see any means of doing so -- each party feeling sore and insulted and delighting to bark and bite.

Sunday 23

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd called -- also Ann, Samuel, Edward and Charles Celli.

Monday 24

Received letter from Louie, wrote to her and to Cleve to answer the dear child's note to me written in a pretty little running hand. Walked to Leymont Place to take an agonising boot to be stretched -- may it be done!

Tuesday 25

Ayrton came to early dinner -- went with him to Scholastic Agency office -- then he went to Bradford about a school. Heavy fog came on. Mrs Pyne brought Ursula. Letter from Allan giving bad accounts of his baby and Maud. Dined with Effie.

Wednesday 26

Walked with Ursula to see Ann. Letter from Louie. Card from Kate saying that Mattie and Will were appreciated by the English at Japan. Long and well written letter from Cleve.

Thursday 27

Went to Waverley Road Schools to record my vote.

Friday 28

Went with Ayrton to Mrs Pyne’s. On my return found a telegram from Mr Wallis announcing the death of my dear brother Edward, one of the exalted souls of this world, always striving after the welfare of others.

Saturday 29

Went to Bexill with Holroyd, saw his marble-looking very handsome head so majestic in the calm of death. I felt thankful that he was removed from all his perplexities out of which we could see no escape. Mrs Pyne came and Kate -- Ayrton left with Ursula.

[What I wonder were his perplexities, other than his poor health? No mention here of his wife.]

Sunday 30

Went to St. Stephen's. Miss Skinner called. Florrie came in as brilliant as usual. Holroyd and Effie came.

December

Monday 1

Went to Mrs Pyne’s about buying mourning.

Tuesday 2

Went with Mrs Pyne to buy mourning at Civil Service.

Wednesday 3

Making mourning

Thursday 4

Wrote to Will to tell him of his dear Father's death.

Friday 5

Wrote to Allan about his Uncle Edward

Sunday 7

Went to St. Stephen's

Monday 8

Pauline Dardis called.

[Who was Pauline Dardis? Connection here with Nugents?]

Tuesday 9

Walter Clifford and John Sharp came to dinner. Edward, H and C Celli came in the evening. Holroyd came later.

Thursday 11

Working all morning. Dined at Holroyd's, met Mr and Miss Skinner and Colonel Williams of Allan's regiment -- talked the usual commonplaces. Holroyd read aloud Cleve's letter on American and Cuban and Ashanti wars, two sheets closely written. Intensely foggy and cold.

Friday 12

Having taken cold remained in bed, not well. Still foggy. Letters from Allan and Louie and Edith. Julia dined with Ann and Samuel. Holroyd came in the evening. Effie at Sevenoaks with Nugent.

Saturday 13

Better, and up in time to receive Colonel Williams and his two little boys to luncheon. Weather less foggy.

Sunday 14

Did not go to church. Little Nugent came as Holroyd and Effie were at Beckenham. Charlie Celli came to supper.

Monday 15

Letter from Mattie dated 15th through Hong Kong dated on postmark October 20th. Julia went to meet Cleve from Margate. We called on Ann.

Tuesday 16

Julia took Cleve to see Mrs Nelson.

Wednesday 17

Took Cleve to the British Museum -- took much interest in all he saw.

Thursday 18

Went to see the Miss Shurrs. The old lady wonderfully well.

Friday 19

Took Cleve to the Soane Museum -- he was much interested in the Mr Bonomi’s explanation of the hieroglyphics on the Sarcophagus. Louie came from Margate. Ottie and Henry came.

Saturday 20

All except Julia who was better occupied went with the children to Sanger’s Circus. The spectacular piece on fair Rosamund who is not poisoned, on which Cleve observed as that was done wrong he supposed Becket would be done wrong.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's with the boys. Florrie, Kate, Miss S. and Ann called.

Monday 22

Went with Cleve and Ottie to the Kensington Museum from eleven o'clock till half-past four. The boys much interested in the ship models and arms and armour, and less so in buildings, did not care for portraits. Louie returned to Margate. Edith and Ayrton called.

Tuesday 23

Called with the boys at Ashley House. Florrie and Kate returned to luncheon. Mrs Nelson called and I called there in the afternoon. Ayrton called. Wrote to Barton Lodge on the death of his wife.

Wednesday 24

Went to Margate with Cleve. Found baby grown a very fine intelligent child. Holroyd came by next train.

Thursday 25

Louie Johnny Holroyd Cleve and the two Miss Barnes’s were the party to dinner. The Miss Bs sang to the guitar during the evening.

Friday 26

At Margate. Holroyd left for London

Saturday 27

At Margate.

Sunday 28 to Wednesday 31

At Margate.

[THE WASTE OF FOOD -- at the Cookery School, a day or two ago, Mr Buckmaster produced a large heap of bread which he had picked up in the Hyde-park, with remnants of joints, sufficiently good to provide 20 or 30 persons with a good dinner. He said he did not want his audience to indulge in commonplace expressions of sorrow at such sinfulness and waste. He wanted every lady to look after her own kitchen, because the master and mistress were as much to blame for this waste as the servants. A century ago ladies of the highest rank, after prayers, used to put on clean muslin aprons and spend one or two hours in the kitchen, and this intercourse between servants and mistresses was a good thing for both.]

END

Diary, 1874

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1874. In this year she became 61, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 18 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000.

[At the beginning, loose, a press cutting dated September 21, 1874: “Mr and Mrs S C Hall celebrated their Golden Wedding yesterday. It was observed as a day of open house at Avenue Villa, Holland-street, Kensington, for the reception of the many friends who were anxious to pay a congratulatory visit on so interesting an occasion. Mr and Mrs Hall are in the enjoyment of good health and mental vigour….. To each caller was given a card, upon which were printed photographs of the host and hostess and a little poem which we append: [titled - After Fifty Years!]”

Yes! fifty years of troubles – come and gone –
I count since first I gave thee hand and heart!
But none have come from thee, dear Wife – not one!
In griefs that sadden’d me thou had’st no part –
Save when, accepting more than woman’s share
Of pain and toil, despondency and care,
My comforter thou wert, my hope, my trust:
Ever suggesting holy thoughts and deeds:
Guiding my steps on earth, through blinding dust,
Into the Heaven-lit path that Heaven-wards leads

(and more)

It is possible that these were the grandparents of Arthur Hall and great grandparents of his daughter Mildred (Mim) Hall, Arthur’s daughter and co-heiress, who married Nugent Chaplin in 1897.
There is also a press cutting headed ‘Mr Gladstone on Dogma.]

January

Thursday 1

At Margate with Louis and Cleve.

Friday 2

At Margate. Wrote to Alan and Mattie

Saturday 3 to Friday 9

At Margate.

Saturday 10

Returned from Margate

Thursday 15

Wrote to Mattie

Friday 16

Wrote to Allan

Saturday 17

J. E H. S. came on the way to Devon

Sunday 18

Went to St. Stephen's

Thursday 22

Wrote to Mattie. Called on Mrs Nelson. Heavy fog.

Friday 23

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 24

Parliament dissolved.

Sunday 25

Went to St. Stephen’s. Holiday. Effie and boy dined here. Called on Ann and took tea at Mme Celli's. Octavia Saltwell called.

Monday 26

Called on Mrs Nelson. Edith and Ursula came. Dined at Mrs Pyne's. General Election.

Tuesday 27

In the city observed the statue of Prince Consort on Holborn Viaduct, rather absurd to fancy a man holding his hat just off his head for ever – an uneasy position

Wednesday 28

[At this point a press cutting: TOWER HAMLETS:
"Five candidates are now in the field for this constituency, and their addresses, which were approved of at private meetings of their supporters held on Monday night, were circulated among the electors yesterday. Mr Ayrton, whom a certain section of the constituency seems anxious to supplant, seems likely to receive a larger measure of support than his opponents calculated upon, and yesterday a willing band of voluntary agents were canvassing the electors in his behalf. Mr Samuda, the other past member, has also decided to seek re-election; and in his address he says: -- "In again asking your confidence and support, it is to enable me to continue my unswerving allegiance to my distinguished leader, Mr Gladstone, to be able to assist him in the great financial policy he has announced." The Conservatives have only been able to secure one candidate. An eminent Conservative lawyer, who was asked on Monday night to come forward, declined to comply with the request, on the ground that his return was extremely doubtful. The party in the borough, therefore, now centre their hopes upon Mr Charles T Ritchie, who is supported by the Tower Hamlets Conservative Club, and also to a certain extent by the licensed victuallers. In his address, copies of which were privately circulated on Monday night, but afterwards recalled, he says, "While I shall give a steady support to the Conservative party, I shall claim to exercise my independent judgement on all the questions that come before Parliament; and while resisting all schemes for the uprooting of our cherished institutions, I shall ever be found on the side of progress." Mr Curry, the fourth candidate, comes forward as the Liberal and the member of the Church of England, while Captain Maxse, the first candidate announced, rests his claims on the fact that he is a Radical in politics, and has for years consistently advocated the interest of working men. The various candidates will address public meetings in the course of the present week. Mr Ayrton's first meeting will not be held till Saturday night. At a meeting of the Tower Hamlets Nonconformist Liberal Association, held in Zion Chapel on Monday evening, Mr Thomas Scrutton, a member of the School Board, in the chair, it was unanimously resolved to oppose any gentleman as a candidate for the borough who was connected with the brewing or distilling interest, and anyone who is in favour of opening museums on Sundays. This resolution excludes both Mr Curry and Captain Maxse. The Committee of the Tower Hamlets Nonconformist Liberal Association have, after careful consideration, passed the following resolution: -- "Under the circumstances in which we are now placed, and having regard to the interest of the Liberal party, it is deemed advisable to urge upon all the friends of the association the support of the old members, Messrs Ayrton and Samuda." They also believe that it will be a false policy for any Liberal elector to abstain from voting on the ground that the old members are not in sympathy with them on all points, and urge that on the day of election each Liberal should feel the duty incumbent on him to exercise his franchise.”]

Thursday 29

At Hereford Sq all day with Julia, engaged on Acton's election work -- 32,900 circulars sent out to electors.

Friday 30

As above

Saturday 31

Went early to Hereford Sq, work done.

February

Sunday 1

Went to St. Stephen’s. Acton called, and Ann

Monday 2

Shopping for W. and Mattie. Called on Mrs Skinner, saw her and Mr S. Called on Effie, out. London generally very empty.

[At this point a press cutting showing that votes were cast as follows in the election:
Mr R Ritchie, MP 7,228; Mr J. D.'A Samuda, MP 5,900; Mr Currie, 5,022; Rt Hon A. S. Ayrton, 3,202; Captain Maxse, 2,992. Total Liberal votes 17,116 and total Conservative votes 7, 228.]

Tuesday 3

Went with Julia to Tredegar, found all well and happy. Johnny left us for Margate. Letters from Japan dated December 1st. Streets full at the Tower Hamlets.

Wednesday 4

To Oxford Street to buy things for Mattie. John Skinner returned late from the meeting at the Tower Hamlets -- a stormy affair. Holroyd and Ayrton were there. Reading "the Parisians".

Thursday 5

Tower Hamlets Election. Shopping for Mattie. Result of election not declared. Wrote to Japan.

Friday 6

Went to Mrs Pyne's. Went to see Ms L. Shurr. Old Ms Shurr very drowsy. The fog heavy.

Saturday 7

Went to Houndsditch with Japan parcels and on to Ayrton's. Ann, Samuel, W. Greathead and John dined with us. W. Clifford and Charlie came in the evening.

Sunday 8

Went to St. Stephen's. Dined with Holroyd.

Monday 9

Letter from Japan dated October 15th. Sent parcel to Agnes. Called on Mrs Saltwell, Mrs Howard and Evegards. Weather fine and frosty.

[Press cutting: To the electors of the Tower Hamlets: "I tender my cordial thanks to the Electors who spontaneously supported me on Thursday last. I regret that the Borough should have taken so little interest in public affairs, and have neutralised the political importance it has hitherto enjoyed. Acton S. Ayrton, 27 Hereford Sq.]

[Was 27 Hereford Square Acton’s address, or his party office?]

Tuesday 10

Letter from Allan. Went to Lancaster Road, to see Mrs Dickens, out, then to Oxford Street on Elliott (?). Called on Mrs Nelson and took dinner at Mrs Pyne's. Ursula came. J E H S here. Read “Parisians”.

Wednesday 11

Called on Ann. Very cold. Mr Skinner dined here, waited until 11.30 to see J E H S.

Thursday 12

Effie called, walked with her. J E H S left in the evening for Paris. Wrote to Louie.

Friday 13

Holroyd called, brought Nugent. Wrote to Allan. Wrote to Mattie, sent eye glass. Wrote to Farquharson.

Saturday 14

Mrs Pyne and Edith called.

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen’s. Called on Georgina with Ursie.

Monday 16

Took Ursula home. Called to hurry Farquharson

Tuesday 17

Began to make some orange wine. Seville oranges only 8/9 for 300 -- wine will be cheap. Letter from Allan.

Friday 20

Went with Ann to Highgate. Ellen much the same. Julia wrote to Mattie with a note from Louie. Weather cold and misty rather than foggy. Called on Mrs William Knight and on Ann. J E H S returned from Paris.

Sunday 22

Carina's birthday. J E H S went to Margate. Holroyd and Effie dined here. Acton called.

Monday 23

Letter from Mattie

Wednesday 25

Rain. Ayrton came.

Thursday 26

Josephine's boy born. All well. Called on Ann -- ill with bronchitis.

Friday 27

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 28

Irene's birthday. Went to Farquharson’s to finish packing Will’s things -- called on Georgina, saw baby. Fine pretty child. Went to see Irving in ‘Philip’..


March

Monday 2

Called on Mrs H. Holroyd, Mrs Whichcote, the Nortons. C Celli came in the evening. Wrote to Mrs Ellis and Russell of Scotsman. Called on Mme Celli. Looked at house in Cambridge Gardens. Called on Ann. Wrote to Caroline, returned Maud's letter. Mr Skinner dined here and read letter from Maud. Letter from Farqharson to say (?) were going tomorrow to Japan.

Wednesday 4

Went to see Miss Shurr on her 97th birthday -- full of affectionate sympathy for us all -- then to Oxford Street. Called on Effie. Wrote to (?) Jay.

Thursday 5

Wrote to Mattie, Mrs Skinner, Louie. Letter from Allan. Called on Ann. Wrote to Mr Relch declining guardianship of F Ayrton.

[This is of interest. I thought this was a J but now I think an F. So who was F Ayrton? See also 30 June. My first idea was that Emma had returned to Germany for good and that Julia was without a parent, her father having died.]

Friday 6

Called on Saltwell's and Mrs Pyne. Emily took dish to Edith. Stayed to tea at Mrs Pyne's. Miss James in bed with bad leg. Julia at Mme Celli's.

Saturday 7

Received letter from E Ellis. Called to enquire for Josephine's baby also on Ann and M Celli. Acton called, also Effie and Nugent.

Sunday 8

Went to early service. Holroyd Effie and Nugent dined here. Ann called. Read life of Sir J. Landseer.

Monday 9

Snow fell, but warm. Rain also. Letter from Florrie, answered it. Wrote to Mrs Skinner. Called on Ann. Read life of (?)impson. Weather intensely cold.

Tuesday 10

Intensely cold. J E H S came and went to debate.

Wednesday 11

Went with Ann to see Landseer pictures. Received tickets from Acton to see procession of entrance into London of the Duke and Duchess of Edinburgh. Reading Life of Dickens. J E H S came to dinner.

Thursday 12

Ground covered with snow. Letter from Allan. Grand entry of D. and D. of Edinburgh, gave my tickets to Effie and Holroyd. Called on Mme Celli. Letter from Louie.

Friday 13

Called on Mme Celli -- better. Wrote to Allan and sent paper about Coomassie(?) burnt. Walked to Paddington Green. Letter from D. Hicks. Called to see C Ellis's baby -- fine child. Called on Miss Skinner, saw Florrie. Mr Skinner called here.

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen's. Florance came to luncheon. Called at Holroyd's and at M Celli’s. Ann came to tea.

Monday 16

Went to Westbourne Grove. In evening had a note asking me to go to Georgina’s as Josephine had had an overdose of laudanum and was very ill -- she rallied about ten o'clock up to which time she appeared to be sinking. Letter from Allan.

Tuesday 17

Came home from Georgina's. Letter from Mrs Williams. Returned to Georgina's to dine and sleep, found Josephine wonderfully better but still requiring care.

Wednesday 18

Slept last night at Georgina's, returned home. Josephine doing well. Called on Effie. Walked to Harrow Road. Ann called.

Thursday 19

Received letter from Mattie Merrill alluding to his father's death. Went to Bow. Mrs. Henvey confined with a girl.

Friday 20

Wrote to Mattie. Went to Georgina’s. Josephine better.

Saturday 21

Ayrton brought Ursula. Took her to Stanley Gardens. Holroyd came in the evening about Edward’s affairs.

Sunday 22

To St. Stephen's, heard Dean Stanley for orphans. C Celli dined here and with Julia went to Bow, called on M Celli. Acton came in the evening

Monday 23

Letter from Louie saying she was coming to town. Called on Georgina with Ursula. Louie arrived with Cleve. Nugent poorly.

Tuesday 24

Edith came to early dinner and took Ursula home. Mrs Pyne called.

Wednesday 25

Took Cleve to British Museum. Met Acton there. Cleve much interested in Greek antiquities. Louie far from well.

Thursday 26

Worked in morning. Mme Celli to lunch. Louie dined with Holroyd. Walked with Cleve.

Sunday 29

C. Martin and Acton called


April

Wednesday 1

Louie left us for Margate.

Friday 3 (Good Friday)

Wrote to Allan. Went to Bow.

Saturday 4

J E H S, Florance and Miss Skinner lunched here. Went to Effie's. Wet evening.

Sunday 5

Went to Bow, Audrey poorly.

Monday 6

Went with Cleve to C. Martin for the first sitting for his portrait. Letters from Japan.

Tuesday 7

Went to C. Martin's

Thursday 9

Went to C. Martin's. Letter from Allan.

Friday 10

Went to C. Martin's with Ottie. Wet afternoon. Wrote to Mattie.

Saturday 11

Holroyd came to breakfast. Ann called. Walked with the boys to the Serpentine where Holroyd met them and took them on the water. Called on Mrs Whichcote -- Holroyd came to dinner.

Sunday 12

Went St. Michael’s Cornhill intending to go to Bow -- rained too much so I returned. Allan, Miss Skinner and A Wesby called.

Monday 13

Went to Mr Martin’s for Cleve’s portrait – walked there and back through pouring rain.

[Included here is a press cutting: "THE LAST DAYS OF DR. LIVINGSTONE." It consists of a letter from Frederick Holmwood, assistant to the Consul-General, Zanzibar, March 12th 1874, addressed to the president of the Royal Geographical Society.
"My dear Sir Bartle, -- no doubt you will hear from several interested in Dr. Livingstone; but, as I do not feel sure that anyone has thoroughly examined the men who came down with his remains, I briefly summarise what I have been able to clean from a careful cross-examination of Majwara, who was always at his side during his last days; and Susi, as well as the Nassick boys, have generally confirmed what he says. I enclose a small sketch map, merely giving my idea of the locality, and have added that dotted line to show his route during this last journey of his life.....
(At this point a detailed account of his movements towards the place where he died)
Only Majwara was present when he died, and he is unable to say when he ceased to breathe. Susi, hearing that he was dead, told Jacob Wainwright to make a note in the Doctor's diary of the things found by him. Wainwright was not quite certain as to the day of the month, and as Susi told him the Doctor had last written the day before, and he found this entry to be dated 27 April, he wrote 28th April, but on comparing his own diary on arrival at Unyanyembe he found it to be the fourth of May; and this is confirmed by Majwara, who says Livingstone was unable to write for the last four or five days of his life. I fancy the spot where Livingstone died is about 11.25 degrees South and 27 degrees East; but of course the whole of this is subject to correction, and although I have spent many hours in finding it all out, the Doctor's diary may show it to be very imperfect. I fear you will find this is a very unconnected narration, but my apology must be that the Consul-General is not well, and the other assistant absent on duty, and there is much work for me to do.....”

Tuesday 14

Went to C Martin's for last sitting. Cleve wanted to continue these sittings which he found charming, with reading British (?). On leaving I went to Kensington Museum, saw Bayeux tapestry. Note from Allan.

Wednesday 15

Took Cleve and Ottie to the Tower. Met Edith in the London throng in (?)gate Street.

Friday 17

Wrote to Allan. Agnes came in the rain having been to the sale of her father's property. Slept here. Holroyd and J. E H. S. dined at Ayrton's.

Saturday 18

Boys at home in the morning. Afternoon at Crystal Palace with boys and J. E H. S.. Met Mr Grove. J. slept here.

Sunday 19

Went with boys to St. Stephen’s -- J. took them to Scott Bussell’s. Acton called, poorly with rheumatism. Holroyd saw and liked Cleve's portraits.

Monday 20

J. E H. S. took Cleve home -- sad farewell. Ottie went to Greenwich with B. Westby. I went to Bow.

Tuesday 21

Mr Skinner and M A lunched here. I took Ottie to station to return to Brighton. Julia returned from Margate.

Wednesday 22

Letter from Allan. Went to C. Martin's for first sitting. Pleasant conversation.

Thursday 23

Went to C. Martin's -- thence to M. A. Skinners wanted to see Coomapie gold wares - could not succeed.

Friday 24

Went to C Martin's. Wrote to Mattie, to Will.

Sunday 26

Went to St. Stephen's. ? after to Wimbledon with Holroyd saw Mr R.(?)ey and Marion interesting with little girls in their arms -- all genial as usual.

Monday 27

To C. Martin's

Thursday 30

Saltwell's, Mrs Whichcote, Mrs Nelson and Miss Dardis called. Went to C. Martin's.


May

Friday 1

Went with ticket from Acton to private view of Royal Academy. Exquisite pictures by Leighton -- a remarkably good one by a lady said to be only 23 years of age -- her first in the R A. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 2

Went with Holroyd to International interesting collection of old lace.

Sunday 3

Went to St. Stephen's, heard a very fine sermon from Dr Farrar of Marlborough. Acton called here. Holroyd and Nugent dined here.

Monday 4

Weather very cold and fires required. Received letters from Will and Mattie -- all well and happy. Mattie expecting. Went to C. Martin's -- interesting conversation -- then on to Bow -- did not see Edith. Children very well also Ayrton.

Tuesday 5

Went to C. Martin’s -- portrait like but too well looking I think. Letter from Allan. Went to Debenhams for Mattie. Called on Effie.

Wednesday 6

Went to C. Martin's. Occupied in garden, put in geraniums. Wrote to Miss Leighton.

Thursday 7

Shopping for Mattie. Ann called. Received hamper from Agnes. Wrote to ask Miss James and J. Sharpe to dinner.

Friday 8

Wrote to Mattie. Sent papers to Allan.

Saturday 9

Ann, Samuel, Mme Celli dined here. J. Sharpe and Henri C. came in the evening.

Sunday 10

Went to St. Stephen's, heard a good plain sermon from Selwyn, Bishop of (?). Mr Skinner called. Miss S. and Ashley Westby supped here.

Monday 11

Spent all the afternoon at Shoolbred’s shopping for Mattie. Letter from (?) saying he liked Cleve's portrait.

[A press cutting pasted here headed UNIVERSITY OF LONDON: Admission of women to degrees. It reads as follows: "Yesterday the annual Convocation of the University of London was held in the University Theatre, Burlington-gardens; Doctor Storrar in the chair. The first business set down for discussion was the adjourned debate on the motion "that in the opinion of Convocation it is desirable that women should be permitted to take degrees in the University of London." Mr Fitch commenced the discussion. Amongst the objections made to the motion was this, that the University had already recognised the claims of women, and that there was no necessity for going further. During the last six years that women had been omitted, what loss had the University sustained by their admission? The University had made a distinction between men and women; but he never heard any intelligible explanation of that distinction. He thought the whole curriculum of instruction should be open to women as well as to men. He never heard that the examiners made any difference in the questions asked or that they were made easier in the case of females. The number of female applicants for the higher University honours would always be very small. He quoted the late Mr Grote to show what women were capable of doing in literature and science, and that it was unjust to exclude such women from University honours. He pointed out that the opening of examinations by Oxford and Cambridge to girls had stimulated education throughout the country. He hoped that, both on grounds of generosity and of justice, this claim of women would be conceded. Mr Goldsmith, MP, said that it by no means followed that those who opposed this motion were opposed to the education of women. His opinion was, that women were in many respects vastly superior to men, but the qualities required in men were different from those required in women, and therefore their education should be kept distinct. He believed, therefore, that the curriculum of women should be different from that of men. The intellect was more powerful in man, the sentiment in women, and this distinction of nature ought to be carried out in their education. Mr Elliott thought that women who proved that they had the ability should be admitted to the higher degrees. Mr Crick said that, as an examiner, he could say that he found no difference in intellect between boys and girls. Indeed, the result of his experience was that the girls did better than the boys. But he did not think any of them would wish to see their girls write B A and M A after their names. He was not opposed to the education of women, but he thought that refinement, which was their chief characteristic, should be preserved. He moved the following amendment: -- "That, in the opinion of Convocation, it was desirable that women should be permitted to present themselves for examinations in arts, and that the successful candidates should receive not degrees, but certificates of having passed." Mr Lawson seconded the amendment. The Reverend Mr Conway supported the motion. The Reverend Mr Miller called on Convocation to do justice to the better part of mankind by passing the motion. Dr Quain opposed the motion, on the ground that women were unfitted by nature from following the practice of physic or law. They might be better fitted for the profession of the Reverend gentleman who had just spoken. The Reverend Mr McKenna said it would be absurd to separate the certificate from the degree. How would boys like to be treated in that way? Mr Robbards, Dr Simpson, and Mr Osler having addressed the Convocation, Mr Hensman (who moved the original resolution) replied, and said that in passing it the House would not only be doing justice to women but honour to themselves. The amendment was then put, and a division was taken on the original motion, when there appeared -- For the motion, 83; against it, 65. The result was received with cheers. The motion, therefore, in favour of the admission of women to degrees, was carried.]

Tuesday 12th

Went to Shoolbred’s with Ann.

Wednesday 13

Walked to Charles Martin's. Ayrton and Edith dined with us. Holroyd called.

Thursday 14

Went to Shoolbred's for Mattie. Holroyd came in the evening, signed agreement to settle affairs with Edward’s widow. Received letter from Victoire Johnson.

Friday 15

Walked to Marshall and Snellgrove. Johnny came in the evening from Margate. Wrote to Victoire Johnson and to Allan.

Saturday 16

Received letters from Maud and Allan

Friday 22

Wrote to Mattie. Louie and Cleve with Baby came -- splendid child.

Monday 25 to Thursday 28

Louie and children with us

Wednesday 27

Children came in the afternoon. Holroyd's, Ayrton's, Louie’s, Josephine’s and Mrs H. Smith's -- with their parents except J. E H. S. -- also Mrs Skinner, Florrie and Kate -- Constance Pyne and Arthur Grenfell. All very merry playing in garden.

Thursday 28

Went with Cleve to Royal Academy. Louie went to see Miss Shurr with baby. Lucy and Emily went to see Cleve’s portrait and mine. Anne called in the evening, also Holroyd. Letter from Allan.

Friday 29

Wrote to Allan.

Sunday 31

Went to St. Stephen's


June

Monday 1

The 61st anniversary of my birthday. Very happy, children all well and no bad news from the East. Went to Bow.

Tuesday 2

Called at Georgina’s. Cleve, baby Nugent, Irene had tea there.

Wednesday 3

Went to Highgate. Dined at Mrs Pynes -- met Ayrton and Edith there. Ann and Samuel called -- heard of the sudden death from cold of Mr and Mrs Knight's eldest child. Left London (?) steamer John (?) with Louie and children for Etretat at 1 p.m., arrived outside Havre at 9 p.m.

Friday 5

Could not get in until 12 o'clock, tide not high enough - having been duly (?) reached Etrétat at 8 o'clock -- all comfortably prepared for us.

Saturday 6

Nugent's birthday.

Wednesday 10

Received letter from Mattie.

Monday 15

Walked on the West Hill with Cleve. Weather cold

Tuesday 16

Rain all afternoon

Wednesday 17

Wrote to Mattie via England, also Julia. Weather warmer. Letter from Julia telling me of H. Henvey going to India

Saturday 20

Holroyd's second girl born, to be named Matilda.

[Attached is a letter from Holroyd on the back of a telegram from Kate Skinner at Notting Hill delivered at Lincoln’s Inn, June 20 and reading: "E and baby girl doing well -- born a quarter past eight. I am on my way with the children." He writes "My dear mother, I (?) Mrs Miller this morning at 7am and here is the result. It is a curious coincidence that it is Allan's and Mattie’s birthday. I think we must call the young one Matilda after you and after Mattie as the patron saint of the day. Gwendoline has been staying with us: she and Nugent are a very droll little couple. Kate takes them back to Brighton today, so the house will be nice and quiet for Effie. I wish you were at home if only to give us hints about furniture. Love to all at Etretat and thank Johnny for his letter. Your affectionate son, Holroyd Chaplin]

Tuesday 23

Reading Le (?) d’Augebault. Julia went to Walland Carey. Received letters from her and Holroyd.

Wednesday 24

J. -- went to London. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 27

Letters from Julia and Holroyd.

Tuesday 30

J. returned from London, reported Emma had returned to Germany. Letter from Holroyd.


July

Wednesday 1

Received letter from Allan via Walland Carey and from Johnny.

Sunday 12

Service at Miss Wilkes’s only (?) and Mr and Mrs Surties(?).

Wednesday 15

[A press cutting is inserted here concerning Garibaldi:
Garibaldi had addressed the following letter to General Bordone à propos of the fifth centenary of the birth of Petrarch, the celebration of which begins at Avignon to-morrow:
“Caprera, July 1, 1874. – My dear General
De’ vivi inferno (Roma) un gran miracol fia
Se Cristo teco alfine non s’adira.
These magnificent lines of the great poet of Vaucluse prove the anti-clerical character of his immortal genius. Petrach, as much as Dante, is certainly one of the most vigorous of the great pioneers who struck at the very foundation of the monstrous edifice of superstition at a time when inquisitors of all orders roasted human flesh with as much ardour as could be shown by the anthropophagi of the Cannibal Islands. The men who prepared the great French Revolution, and to whom the world is indebted for the immortal Declaration of the Rights of Man, the Voltaires, the Diderots, the d’Alemberts, and all the members of that galaxy of giants would certainly blush to find themselves succeeded by the poor pigmies of to-day who constitute the misfortunes of humanity. But before those glorious forerunners of human emancipation, as well as by the side of them, we may justly place the Songster of Laura, and, under his auspices, as an antitheses of Clericalism, we may cement the fraternity of peoples, and, above all, that of France and Italy, who are destined to march together in the path of civilisation. – Yours faithfully,
G Garibaldi]

Thursday 16

Wrote to Mattie and Julia.

Saturday 18

All went to Fécamp -- good town in a wide valley with pretty little docks. Enjoyed the drive. Weather hot but air fresh.

Sunday 19

Service at Miss Wilkes’s by a Mr Bussell. Fourteen persons, English, French and American.

Monday 20

Letters from Mattie and Julia.

Tuesday 21

Miss Wilkes (?) having tenanted she came to us, dined here. We went to her in the evening and she being afraid to sleep alone in her cottage, John slept there.

Wednesday 22

John went to London. Called on Miss Wilkes. Read in paper of two persons deaths, ages respectively according to ‘acte de naissance’ 107 and 130 years.

Thursday 23

Letters from Holroyd and Allan

Friday 24

Left Etrétat by diligence for Havre, arrived there at 7 o'clock and proceeded by boat to Southampton. Baby and Cleve very well and slept all-night, both delighted to see Lucy, saw them off and came to London with Emily on morning.

Saturday 25

Found Julia well -- enjoyed the comforts of home -- this cheerful neatness has an undue effect upon me.

Sunday 26

Went to St. Stephen's. Mrs Pyne called, Edith's children dined here. Ayrton gone to Liege. Ursula so like her father at the same age in manner and face. Holroyd called. Went to see Effie, pretty well

Monday 27

Went to Schoolbred’s to pay Will’s bill. Letter from Louie.

Wednesday 29

Acton called, said he was going to America.

Thursday 30

Called on Miss Shurr -- spoke of the wealth of the Landseers’ who in their youth lived with the greatest economy, now have (Sir E L’s two sisters) £200,000 between them.

Friday 31

Went to Ann's to get an answer to our invitation. She came to dinner with C Celli. Wrote to Mattie and to Allan.

August

Saturday 1

Acton went to America. Took Nugent to Zoological Gardens. He was well amused, Rode grandly on the elephant looking as solemn and amiable as the animal.

Sunday 2

Mrs Smith called. Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd dined with us and took home Nugent.

Monday 3

Long and pleasant letter from Mattie. Photo from Allan of his child -- pretty. Went with Julia to Royal Academy -- last day. All sorts of people there. Letters from Ayrton (Liège) and Edith (Rugby).

Tuesday 4

Called on Holroyd, saw Mr McGill and Edward.

Wednesday 5

Called on Georgina. Sent pictures to Allan. Wrote to Mrs Ellis about Ayrton. Holroyd went to Brittany with W. McGill

Thursday 6

Called on C Martin about photographing Cleve's portrait -- he out, saw his wife. Called in Hereford Square, all right.

Friday 7

Dined at Mrs Pyne's. Wrote to Mattie via United States.

Saturday 8

M. Celli dined here by invitation. Mr Skinner dropped in at 6 p.m.

Sunday 9

Went to St. Stephen's. Read life of Dante who, like all the greatest men, is adverse to the papal establishment. Called on Ann, saw Edward.

Monday 10

Letter from Louie and Cleve. Wrote to Ayrton at Liege. Went to C Martin’s about photographing Cleve's portrait.

Tuesday 11

Went to Highgate. Ellen not so well but cheerful. Nellie very funny.

Wednesday 12

Went to C Martin’s about frame, he out, twaddled with Mrs Martin. Mr Skinner called and Mrs Whichcote with Miss Caley. Mrs Pyne called. M. Celli dined here.
[Twaddled: From Shorter Oxford English Dictionary - twaddling a. (a) having the character of twaddle; senseless, rubbishy; trifling, insignificant; (b) uttering or prone to talking twaddle – Late 18th Century]

Thursday 13

Weather wet and cold. Julia to dentist for stopping. Read "Innocent" by Mrs Oliphant. Letter from Effie (At Weston).

Friday 14

Wrote to Allan. Called on Miss Saltwell.

Saturday 15

Letter from Holroyd.

Sunday 16

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Ann.

Monday 17

Went to Baker Street to buy things for Maud.

Tuesday 18

Called on Miss Caley. Letter from Edith.

Thursday 20

Edith Ursula and Audrey came from Clifton.

Friday 21

Wrote to Mattie. Bought sewing machine. Edith went to Bow.

Saturday 22

Went with Edith to call on Mrs Pyne, heard that Constance was engaged to Mr Baines.

Sunday 23

Went to St. Stephen's with Edith. Ann came.

Monday 24

Papers from Japan. Edith returned home with Audrey. Leaving Ursie with me.

Tuesday 25

Louie came from Exeter where she had slept en route from Walland Carey -- with brilliant baby and Cleve and Lucy. Ann called. Letter from Allan and photo of his baby. Mrs Pyne called.

Thursday 27

Sent parcel to India. Edith and Ayrton dined here.

Friday 28

Called with Louie and children at Ann's. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 29

Letter from Acton. Letter from Mattie.

Sunday 30

Went to St. Pauls morning service. Then on to Bow with Cleve. Walked in Victoria Park.

Monday 31

Louie and children went to Shirley to see Mrs Williams. Packed for Margate. Wrote to Holroyd and to Acton.


September

Tuesday 1

Came to Margate with Julia and Ursula -- found it much fuller than we had expected to find it – so, were glad to get apartments in the Royal Crescent even at a high price as there were none on coast to suit us. Letter from Allan.

Wednesday 2

Louie and children arrived having much enjoyed their visit to Mrs Williams.

Thursday 3

Weather fine, enjoyed the sea. Went with Louie to look for school for Cleve, saw a rather vulgar wife at Mr Head's school.

Friday 4

Went again to seek for school, had an interview with Mr Boulder, a pleasant looking person and unpretentious. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 5

Went to see Mr Boulder, Dane Hill House. He out, saw Mrs (?)eney, a lady-like person. Cleve beseeched Louie on his knees not to send him to school.

Sunday 6

Went to church at St. Johns Hall, service well done. Wet afternoon.

Monday 7

Louie took Cleve to Dane House. He controlled himself on parting having been diverted by the examination he had gone through. I met him at the school at half past five, when he rushed into my arms saying it was a splendid school, no teasing.

Tuesday 8

Weather bright. Letter from Allan. Wrote to Mrs Nelson and Emily. Went to meet Cleve, missed him.

Wednesday 9

Went to show Cleve's school to Ursula -- being late returned home.

Saturday 12

J E H S came to Margate. Letter from Acton, just starting for San Francisco. Bill of Lading of things from Japan.

Monday 14

[Press cutting here, very long, about the Late M. Guizot, from Paris. About his life and family and very descriptive of his home at Val Richer near Lisieux. MAC may have known him or others of his family, or perhaps it was just that he was evidently a Protestant and an Anglophile, as well as a historian of note, so may have been well known to English Francophiles like her.]

Wednesday 16

Went with children to the Hall-by-the-Sea -- saw the wonderful performing fleas.

Thursday 17

Julia caught cold.

Friday 18

Wrote to Mattie. Julia not well -- bad cold. Letter from Ursula. John and Louie went to Calais by day return ticket.

Saturday 19

Cleve’s birthday. Parkie Willie(?) here -- all very happy. Julia in bed with a cold.

Sunday 20

Went to church at St. Johns Hall.

Friday 25

Wrote to Allan

Sunday 27

Went to Old Church

Monday 28

Went with Julia to Ramsgate to dine with Mrs Perrey -- drove with them to Pegwell Bay, saw the mad erection of (?) the Granville Hotel -- why that high tower?

Tuesday 29

Returned to London with Julia and Ursula.

Wednesday 30

Holroyd called. Took Ursie to Bow, saw Ottie. Audrey very well -- also Edith and Ayrton. Note from Louie.


October

Thursday 1

Letter from Allan. Called on Mrs Nelson. Ordered Allan's photographs.

Saturday 3

Letter from Acton (Salt Lake City)

Sunday 4

At home waiting for Ottie.

Monday 5

Wrote to Acton and to Mattie. Took Ottie to Bow (?) and dined at Mrs Pyne's, saw Mary and A Baines -- Holroyd came in, and walked home with me -- saw Edith there.

Tuesday 6

Letter from Louie telling that Lucy has been overcome by temper. Went to see Miss Shurr - Miss L. S. for the first time looked an old lady -- she is above 80; 84 I think. Received notice of arrival of Japanese goods.

Wednesday 7

Weather wet. Looked at 16 Westbourne Park which I should like to have. Wrote to Louie. Sent Bill of Lading to Scrutton.

Thursday 8

Letter from Louie. Went to International, called on Mrs Whichcote. Holroyd dined with us.

Friday 9

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 10

Went to Scruttons, St. Dunstan's house, (?) thence on to Ayrton's -- all well. Audrey beginning to talk.

Sunday 11

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Ann.

Monday 12th

All morning unpacking cases from Japan. Letters from Allan and Louie.

Tuesday 13

Mme Celli and Holroyd dined here. Holroyd, H. and C Celli came in evening. Walked in the neighbourhood. Weather very mild and damp. No fire.

Wednesday 14

Ann, Samuel and Holroyd dined here -- looked at Japanese "curios". Julia called on Mrs Pyne.

Thursday 15

Very wet

Friday 16

Wrote to Mattie via India.

Saturday 17

Constance Pyne married to A J. Baines. Went to Bow to take care of Audrey and boys. Florrie came and slept here.

Sunday 18

Went to St. Stephen's. Ayrton brought Ottie. I took him back. Holroyd dined here. Miss S. came

[At this point a letter is pasted in dated Monday October 11, presumably from Louie:
"Dearest Mama, I enclose the note from "die Lady Frances" which will interest you and Julia. Please return it as soon as convenient that I may send it to Mr Skinner. I went to Canterbury with Cleve on Saturday. It was a delightful trip -- successful in every way. Our fares there and back by coach 4, 6 altogether. We went outside and enjoyed seeing the country, dined at a snug little eating house close by the cathedral. Cleve enjoyed this. Then we did the cathedral. Cleve's earnest demeanour attracted much attention. Afterwards I took a fly for an hour and did all the other sites. Most interesting of all was St. Martin's Church, the first ever built in England and adapted from a Roman Temple. It contains the font wherein Ethelbert was baptised, and Queen Bertha's tomb. The clerk who showed us over was enthusiastic about it and repeated conversations with Stanley etc. Cleve glowed. We got back by 8 pm. doing most of the return journey inside the coach. Baby had a bad cold on Friday but Mrs Willy’s homoeopathic remedy of tying a lump of camphor round her throat and J’s remedy of grease in her hair and head answered wonderfully and she is quite (page ends here)]

Monday 19

Called on C Martin, went to International.

Tuesday 20

At home all morning. Went to see "School for Scandal." Well got up and Mrs Candour well done. Minuet danced, not too gracefully, at Prince of Wales.

Wednesday 21

Went to Bow. Letters from Mrs Skinner and Florrie.

Thursday 22

Mrs Nelson called. Went to Shoolbred’s for cloth for children's coats. Called at Holroyd's to see house and on Mrs W. Knight -- they at St. Leonard’s.

Friday 23

Sent photos to Allan. Went to Highgate. Ellen’s left-hand quite paralysed and very little use of right.

Saturday 24

Called on Ann and Mrs Pyne who was just going to Clifton as Alice is very ill. Letter from Acton dated from St. Louis.

Monday 26

Went to Bow. Little Audrey had badly inflamed eyes.

Wednesday 28

Went to Stratford atte Bow. The old houses round the church and the church itself have some interest.

Saturday 31

Took Ottie to Holroyd's and came on home.

November

Sunday 1

Acton returned from America. Miss Skinner called.

Monday 2

Returned to Bow with Ottie who was poorly with the (?) disorder of overeating, not that he is at all greedy.

Thursday 5

Returned from Bow. Audrey pretty well.

Friday 6

Louie came to Town. Called with her on Ann and on Effie. Forgot to write to Allan.

Saturday 7

Went with Louie to Bow -- saw there Mrs Pyne and Bernie. Audrey well.

Sunday 8

Louie went to Ashley House. Mrs Pyne, Alice and Bernie, Ann and Samuel, Holroyd and Effie called

Monday 9

This Lord Mayor’s day was like a May day, so bright and mild, as if made for the show.

Tuesday 10

Called on Florrie. Letters from Allan and Mattie. Went to the Lyceum, saw Irving play Hamlet, wonderfully perfectly absorbing himself into the character.

Wednesday 11

Went to Bow. Gardener at work. Wrote to Mattie via US,

Tuesday 12

Julia went to Highgate. Called on Mrs Nelson, saw them all.

Friday 13

Wrote to Allan. Alice Grenfell and Bernie, Effie and Nugent lunched here.

Saturday 14

Holroyd breakfasted here. Called on Georgina, saw Mrs F. Whitcombe and two daughters. Shopping.

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen's. Florance, Miss S. and A Westby called. Very wet all day.

Monday 16

Called on Ann

Tuesday 17

Went to Billiter(?) Street to see all sorts of things especially Japanese from the East.

Wednesday 18

Looking after gardener. Acton called.

Thursday 19

Wet. Called on Effie. Sent pictures to Mattie.

Friday 20

Bought dress. Called on Evegards -- Mrs E ill.

Saturday 21

Walked in the neighbourhood. Wrote to Mattie.

Sunday 22

Heavy fog all day. Church at St. Stephen's. Holroyd Effie and Nugent dined here. Miss Skinner came in the evening.

Monday 23

Nugent slept here last night. Walked in the neighbourhood. Dined at Acton's. Frosty. Josephine called.

Tuesday 24

Very cold. Called on Mrs Nelson.

Saturday 28

Letter from Mattie announcing birth of child. Wrote to Mattie.

Sunday 29

C. Celli dined here

Monday 30

Ursula's birthday. Lucy with me. Very wet.


December

Tuesday 1

Called on Mrs Nelson. Went about Will’s book to Evans.

Wednesday 2

Called on Mrs Howard and Mrs Pyne. Dined at Holroyd's, met Kate and A Westby.

Thursday 3

Went to bootmaker for Will. Called on Florrie, did not see her. Julia went to Highgate.

Friday 4

Called on Miss L. Shurr. Wrote to Allan about his boy’s illness.

Monday 7

Went to Bootmakers for Will.

Tuesday 8

Brought India rubber for doors [Edgware Rd]. Called on Miss Caley, thus making a triangular walk of about three miles.

Wednesday 9

Letter from Allan about the severe illness of his little boy. Julia went to Mrs Pyne's, saw Edith and children all well.

Thursday 10

Called on Ann. Mrs Armstrong and Josephine -- baby charming but does not appear strong though not unhealthy and very pretty.

Friday 11

Went to Chapel Street about cupboard for Japanese things. Weather very variable. M Celli dined here. J. Skinner came.

Saturday 12

Went to see Effie, found her in bed with a little cold. Saw Acton there. Went on to Miss Shurr.

Sunday 13

Holroyd called. Went to St. Stephen's. John Skinner left. E Feild called.

Monday 14

Went to Mme Celli’s to see Scatola’s boxes opened -- he spent his money very foolishly. To Oxford Street, bought a lamp for Will and Mattie. Julia dined at M Celli's.

Tuesday 15

Letter from Allan, child better - and from Louie to say Cleve was coming -- went to meet him at 10.30. So pleased to see me. Julia took him to Aunt Ann. Went to (?) about Will’s things.

Wednesday 16

Snow had fallen rather dry, thawed a little. Letter from Mattie - going on well. Shopping with Cleve in grove. Effie came with Nugent to lunch.

Friday 18

Went with Cleve to British Museum.

Saturday 19

Holroyd called to ask me to go there, as baby was very ill -- got a wet nurse -- too ill to give hope of rallying.

Sunday 20

Went to Holroyd after breakfast. Baby very ill, remained there. She died at 2.30 pm., sadly emaciated. [This was my mother’s sister who had Downe’s Syndrome]

Monday 21

Edith came in the evening. Went to see Effie.

Tuesday 22

Ayrton came to dinner with Ottie. Called on Mrs Pyne.

Wednesday 23

Ottie left in the morning. Cleve went with Emily to Circus. I went with Holroyd -- to de(?) the poor little worn out body in Kensal Cemetery at the left side of the path to the left of the Chapel -- a bitterly cold day, snow and ice on the ground

Thursday 24

Julia took Cleve to the station for Margate. I went to Bow. They had a juvenile(?) party -- of pupils and their sisters. Wrote to Allan.

Friday 25

All met at Ayrton's except Effie. Louie and John at Margate. Miss Cole there. Holroyd brought little Nugent.

Saturday 26

Julia and I returned home. Effie came to fetch Nugent.

Sunday 27

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Ann. Julia to Misses Shurrs’, all well

Monday 28

Telegram from Margate to say that Louie was ill. Decided to go there at once.

Tuesday 29

Found Louie better. Cleve poorly. Baby too much coddled, but healthy.

Wednesday 30

At Margate

[At the end of the diary, on the Addresses pages, the following:
" Knowledge has a very limited power when it informs the head only; but when it informs the heart as well, it has power over life and death, the body and the soul, and dominates the universe.” -- C. Dickens.

In M A Chaplin’s handwriting:
Serpents in Zoological Gardens - - - - - -Dickens
I have been (by mere accident) been seeing the serpents fed today, with the live birds, rabbits, and guinea pigs – a sight so very horrible that I cannot get rid of the impression, and am, at this present, imagining serpents coming up the legs of the table, with their tongues like the devil’s tail (evidently taken from that model in the magic lanterns and other such popular representations) elongated for dinner. I saw one small serpent whose father was asleep, go up to a guinea pig (white and yellow and with a gentle eye – every hair upon him erect with horror); corkscrew himself on the tip of his tail; open a mouth which could not have swallowed the guinea pig’s nose; dilate a throat which would not have made him a stocking; and show him what his father meant to do with him when he came out of that ill-looking Hookah into which he had (?) himself.
The guinea pig backed against the side of the cage – said “I know it, I know it!” – and his eye glared and his coat turned wiry, as he made the remark. Five small sparrows crouching together in a little trench at the back of the cage, peeped over the brim of it, all the time; and when they saw the guinea pig give it up, and the young serpent go away looking at him over about two yards and a quarter of (?), struggled which should get into the innermost angle and be seized last. Every one of them then his his eyes in another’s breast, and then they all shook together like dry leaves – as I dare say they may be doing now, for old Hookah was as dull as laudanum………. Please to imagine two small serpents, one beginning on the ttail of the white mouse, and one on the head, and each pulling him one way, and the mouse very much alive all the time, with the middle of him madly writhing.
(To my mind the most powerfully written thing I remember to have read – MAC)

This is followed by another extract, from the life of Dickens, on President Lincoln’s premonition of his own death, also a poem by Lord Houghton on Dr Livingstone’s death in Africa and a brief report of it.]

END


Diary, 1875

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1875. In this year she became 62, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 19 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

[Loose inside the cover, three press cuttings:

A press cutting headed THE JEWISH NEW YEAR by a Jewish correspondent. I have transcribed only the parts of it concerned with the New Year festivals in London at that time:
"Today the Jews celebrate the New-Year Festival, and the occasion is marked with great solemnity in all parts of the world in which Jewish congregations are established. This day the Jewish year 5635, reckoning from the creation of the world, commences. The festival lasts two days; but the Reform Jews keep one only as sacred. The occasion is also termed "The Day of Memorial," and its observance is enjoined in Leviticus xxiii. 23, 24, 25, and in Numbers xxix. 1. It is supposed that the transgressions which Israelites have committed during the past year are considered by the Almighty during the first ten days of the new year, and that on the tenth (the Days of Atonement) punishment or reward, as the case may be, is meted out. Trumpets are blown in the synagogue to call the worshippers to a sense of their spiritual position, and to remind them that the Day of Judgement is at hand. In fact, the New-Year’s Festival is also designated "the Day of Blowing."
On this occasion the services commence in the London Synagogues at six o'clock in the morning, and do not terminate in the larger places of worship till nearly one. The majority of the congregation, however, and especially those of the wealthier houses of worship, do not make their appearance till about 10, when more than half the services have been completed. But most Israelites, women included, deem it binding upon their conscience to hear the sound of the trumpet – a ram’s horn, and it is a curious and not very uncommon sight to see a large number of females congregated outside the synagogue in their dishabille, eagerly awaiting the sounds, before hearing which they will not partake of breakfast.

Then follows a detailed account of the ceremonies, with no special reference to London. Then:
Walking through the Jewish quarters of London today, Israelites may be seen dressed in their best clothes, and while many of them -- and especially the foreign portion -- exhibit a rather ultra-fashionable style in their apparel, they display none of the objectionable vagaries which characterise Christians of the lower classes at Christmas or Easter. The morning after the New Years Day, drunken Jews do not figure in the police-courts, and however much ignorant people may be inclined to sneer at the Oriental peculiarities of their worship, too much praise cannot be bestowed upon them for the manner in which they conduct themselves out of synagogue.
On New Years Day, a very peculiar scene is enacted at the Custom House Quay, to which they repair for the purpose of prayer. As the water washers away all impurities, so the Israelites hope their sins may be taken from them. It is somewhat curious to notice hundreds of Poles praying with their faces turned towards the river; the officials of the Custom House gazing on in utter bewilderment, and the "roughs" who abound in the neighbourhood indulging in certain eccentricities not altogether satisfactory to the Jews.
I may mention, in conclusion, that previous to the Day of Atonement, a Jew, meeting another, says "May you be written down for a good year;" on the Day of Atonement he says, "May you be sealed for a good year," it being supposed that the future of a man is written on the first day of the New Year, and sealed on the tenth. As may be expected, synagogic accommodation is now at a premium, and hundreds of little synagogues are improvised in order to meet the universal demand. Some of the temporary places of worship are situated in dirty thoroughfares, and in unhealthy dwellings; but the piety of the worshippers is sincere, if their surroundings are not very refined. The large room of the Jews' Free School, in Bell-lane, Spitalfields, is thrown open as a synagogue for the benefit of the poor, and here above 3000 persons assemble. In the Great Synagogue, Dukes-place, not a seat is to be had for love or money, so general is the adherence of the Jews to their ancient traditions.]

The next press cutting, from an Indian newspaper, is headed THE TEMPLE OF THE MONEY LENDERS and after this someone has written ‘Nagpur.’ It starts:
"It stands near the city gate, but turns its back to the city. Staring across the muddy waters of the tank towards the railway station, fort and the European bungalows, the Small Cause Court wears the air of one not quite at home in his surroundings and longing to move "up town." It is made the more uncomfortable by the progress towards completion of a new Hindu temple within a peon’s call from its door. There are already three close by; and should this sort of thing go on much longer, the Khafifa Adalat will come to be regarded as an approach to a temple -- if not a temple itself. It might, indeed, even now be fairly denominated the "Temple of Money-Lenders."
Then a description of its operation including:
Its lofty mission is to give practical force to the sacred laws of contract as framed by the Legislature and interpreted by Full Benches, but the mahajan’s muktiar’ who instructors his witnesses in the Temple-porch, regards the Court as an automaton so ingeniously constructed that if you put a stamp in at one end a decree will come out at the other. The mahajan is indeed, the favoured child of British rule.
And more of the same, about the lack of compassion for illiterate debtors in India under British rule]

The third and last press cutting has no heading but one paragraph from it illustrates its message:
"For my part I am ready to forgive the members of an ancient and venerable Church which in the dark Middle Ages of Europe thought to symbolise the creed of Christians, and to awaken the devotion of millions who could neither read nor write by statues to attract worship, and by pictures to represent the Virgin Mary and the disciples of Christ, who followed His preaching and inculcated His doctrine. But at the present time the question is totally altered. The millions who before the Revival of Letters could only be told by signs and emblems have now been replaced by millions who have learnt to read the Bible, who have been told the words of Christ in their own native language, and are no longer bound by the theology of subtle logicians. Indeed, it is absurd to suppose that we are on the brink of a great contest between those who have learnt the principles of the Reformation and those who wished to lead us by crooked paths, and windows that shut out the light, to the temples where truth is lost amid a blaze of light, a great pomp of dresses, and the strains of melodious music. It is very evident that the disciples of the Church of Rome wish to lead us from Confession and Absolution to the doctrine of Transubstantiation; from thence to the worship of images, and from thence to all the abuses which at the end of the fifteenth century and at the beginning of the sixteenth excited the anger and the scorn of Luther, Calvin, Zwinglius, and others.”

Next, on the Memoranda page, a poem:

Dirty days hath September
April June and November
And from February until May
The rain, it raineth every day
All the rest hath thirty-one
Without a single gleam of sun
And if any should have thirty-two
They’d be dull and dirty too.

Various quotations from Macauley, whose work MAC evidently admired.

And some addresses:
Maud, 55 York St,
A Grenfell, 41 Devonshire St,
Mrs Vine, 7 Devonshire Terrace, Ventnor, a desirable situation 2-3 and McQueens.


January

At Margate with Louie, John, Cleve and Carina, all with colds except self. Weather intensely cold -- sea surf frozen. Alfonso proclaimed King of Spain by the Republican Party. Effie poorly. Ayrton's children slept at my house last evening as the fog was so thick.

Saturday 2

Thaw in sight, the frost intensely slippery -- fell down.

Sunday 3

Went to service at St. Johns Hall. Weather very fine -- walked after dinner.

Monday 4

Weather fine, quite spring-like.

Tuesday 5

Walked with Louie. Called on Mrs Willy.

Wednesday 6

Called on Miss Barnes. Wrote to Julia. Read "When George 3rd was King," by unknown author -- pretty. Julia forwarded letters from Mattie.

Thursday 7

Wrote to Allan. Letters from Japan.

Friday 8

Wrote to Mattie.

Saturday 9

The little Willys’ dined here. Emma the nurse went home. I undertook baby, who on hearing of Emma having gone said "Who will attend to me?"

Sunday 10

Did not go to church, received Japanese newspaper.

Tuesday 12

John went to London. Louie took children to see Pantomime at Ramsgate, did not remain till the end.

Wednesday 13

I took Cleve to see rest of Pantomime. Walked on Ramsgate Pier having last walked there about 1830.

Thursday 14

Louie went to London and in the evening to a party at Evegards. Being anxious about Baby I called in Mrs Willy. She is not ill beyond an ulcerated mouth.

Friday 15

Louie returned as a baby was not very well.

Sunday 17

Church at assembly rooms. Walked with Cleve in afternoon.

Monday 18

Wrote to Julia. Reading "Wilfred Cumbermede (?)," cleverly written by George Macdonald.

Tuesday 19

Received letters from Allan and Maud.

Thursday 21

Letter from John dated from Paris -- Florance very ill. Cleve not very well. Baby bonnie. Wrote to Allan.

Friday 22

Mrs Willy came.

Saturday 23

Mrs C. Boulden dined here. Weather stormy. Skies very fine. Reading G. McDonald's clever book "Wilfred Comingham."

Sunday 24

Letter from Holroyd, had a slight rheumatism -- did not go out.

Monday 25

Walked on the jetty with Cleve. He told me a pretty incident of poetical justice of a Greek person to a Turk who was afterwards captured by him -- which he remembered my having taught him to read four years ago, and another which he read about a year after. Wind very high, NW. Letter from John, Marseilles. F [Florance] better.

Tuesday 26

Sent letter to Mattie. Received long letter from Allan. Weather very mild.

The Friday 29

Dined with Mrs Willy. Reading a good novel by George Macdonald, supposed diary of a young married woman, very well done.

Saturday 30

Weather very bright, mild, NW wind -- walked with Cleve to Westgate.

Sunday 31

Went to service at Assembly Rooms, moderate sermon by Valpy(?) curate. Walked with Cleve to Westgate, weather very fine.


February

Wednesday 3

Went to Theatre to see Macbeth -- that is we took Cleve, expecting it would be over early -- however it was as late as in London. Cleve enjoyed it much. A pretty little theatre. Letter from Allan. Newspaper from Japan. Weather cold. Called on Mrs Willy.

[Press cutting: Attempt to garrotte the Lord Chief Baron: The Ipswich Journal gives the following: "a rumour prevailing that the Lord Chief Baron had been attacked by garrotters, whom he had succeeded in beating off, we wrote to his Lordship a few days since to beg of him the facts concerning the matter. We received yesterday a reply from his Lordship's private secretary, conveying to us these facts. It appears that the attack was made as far back as Wednesday, January 6. His Lordship was walking home at half past eleven o'clock on the night, by the Bayswater Road, to 8, Connaught Place. When he was the some distance below the Marble Arch, he suddenly found himself surrounded by four men, one of whom struck him a violent blow on the head, while at the same time he felt himself tripped up and thrown to the pavement. Fortunately his Lordship was not stunned, and with great pluck and activity regained his legs and whirled the a thick stick around him with such force that he broke it -- on the head of one of his assailants, let us hope. Upon this the rascals all made off, and his Lordship was able to walk home. So far this account is sufficiently remarkable, when we remember that the Chief Baron is in his 79th year, and is not a man of very powerful frame. But what follows, though quite in accordance with a quiet determination which we all know to be one of the marked features of his Lordship's character, is even more striking. Our informant adds that his Lordship at first thought that he had only sustained a few bruises, but ultimately it was discovered that a rib had been broken. This injury, though painful, and causing some annoyance, has not at all interfered with the performance of his duties. Neither would he take any rest from his work. His Lordship is now, we are happy to say, rapidly recovering. We hardly know which to admire most in this remarkable instance of courage and insurance -- whether the courage with which a man of nearly four score years beats off for assailants; or the quiet indifference to personal ease and comfort with which his Lordship has day by day appeared in Westminster Hall, and merely regards the broken rib and as a matter of "some annoyance."]

Thursday 4

Wrote to Allan. Weather cold. Cleve too tired (after being up late) to go to school.

Friday 5

Cold

Saturday 6

Cold -- walked with Cleve.

Sunday 7

Did not go to church. Weather very cold.

Monday 8

Called on Mrs Willy and Miss Barnes.

Tuesday 9

Returned from Margate where I left all well. J E H. not returned home.

Wednesday 10

Went to Bow (in three-quarters of an hour by junction with Great Eastern to Old Ford Station for the first time -- great gain). All well. Mrs Pyne there. Letters from Japan and from Allan.

Thursday 11

Sent pictures via Southampton to Mattie. Holroyd called. Dined at Mrs Pyne’s. Called on Mrs Nelson. Paid Lubourn(?) and inspected Hospital in Marylebone Road. Girls public day schools not likely to pay dividend.

Friday 12

Wrote via Brindisi to Mattie. Weather bad. Mme Celli dined here. Wrote to Louie.

Sunday 14

Went to St. Stephen's.

Monday 15

Went to Hild(?)’s Cheapside to buy a new dress. Silks all very expensive but rich in colour, and good.

Tuesday 16

Called on Mrs Pyne, then by rail to call on Ann. Saw Constance, returned home covered with a rash after fever, must be of the nature of ringworm or scurvy.

[Attached, a letter: " When Cleve laughed loud Baby said "What are you doing Brubber? You are laughing like a laughing hyena." I have never said anything of the sort, it was quite her own idea. You know that she always says "'esterday" for "yesterday." Last evening she suddenly exclaimed “’esterday is Esthers day!” “’esterday is Esthers day!” Then laughed with delight at the joke. I heard her saying to herself "I love Grangeggar, I do. Grangeggar will come, Grangeggar will.” February 16th/75]

Wednesday 17

Called on Mrs F. Jones. Went to Marshall and Snellgrove. Walked home -- rather tired. Reading XV Chapter of Gibbon whose writings would not be esteemed so ill now as they were 50 years ago.

Thursday 18

Weather very bad, walked in the neighbourhood. Posted paper to Mattie via Southampton. Letter from Louie announcing John's return from Italy where he saw Garibaldi.

[Another scrap: "Baby looked at me gravely this morning but was soon sociable. She said today at tea " I want to go to London town to see Grangeggar. I will walk to London town if you will hold my hand, Mama. February 28th 75"]

Friday 19

Effie and Nugent lunched here. Always more satisfactory to entertain little children than elders. Nugent enjoyed himself thoroughly and wanted to come again soon. Weather very wintry: did not go out. Julia braved it and went as usual.

Saturday 20

Did not go out. Weather very bad. Snow and sleet.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd called, also Edward. C. Celli dined here. Called on Mme Celli.

Monday 22

Letter from Allan.

Tuesday 23

Called on Mrs Norton and Mrs Whichcote.

Wednesday 24

Very cold. Snow and sleet.

Thursday 25

Called on Mrs Pyne, then to Bow by rail all the way. All well there, Ottie included

Friday 26

To the dentist’s. Wrote to Allan. John Skinner came from Margate en route for Devon. His father popped in to dinner full of Allan S's projected marriage to Miss Shelford.

[Allan Maclean Skinner (junior) married Ellen Shelford on 23 September 1875]

Saturday 27

Effie brought Nugent. Julia went to Margate. Nugent and (?) here. Miss H. Holroyd called.

Sunday 28

At home all day. Holroyd dined here. Nugent went home.

[Press cutting: DEAN STANLEY ON SIR CHARLES LYLE AND SIR STERNDALE BENNETT. "It is not often that Westminster Abbey is so crowded as it was yesterday afternoon, in spite of the bleakness of the weather, when Dean Stanley preached a funeral sermon in memory of the late Sir Charles Lyle and Sir Sterndale Bennett. The aisles were completely blocked with people who stood throughout the service, and many distinguished members of the scientific, musical and religious world were present….. and much more]


March

Monday 1

Letter from Julia. Called on Ann. While there, Edith came in, walked back with me. Ursie here. Reading "Malcolm," a charming novel by George McDonald. Letter from Julia.

Tuesday 2

Weather very damp -- thawing but cold. Walked out to call on Effie -- too wet, returned. Called on Mme Celli at Vagence.

Wednesday 3

Bottling orange wine. Walked to see Effie. Letter from Louie. Sent Spencer’s Sociology to Allan and book from J E H S for his child.

[Margate, March 3rd/75
"Dearest dear Mama, having Julia here makes me think so much of you and long for the visit to London which is the point of the year to me, though all my days are happy. Cleve is so well. He has taken a fancy to go long walks on half holidays, timing himself to do the distance fast. It is much better for him than hanging about in the Crescent. You know how Cleve and J. and I always say to Baby "don't eat like a piggy," "you're jumping like a gee gee," etc. Yesterday, I told her not to touch some hot water. "If I do touch it," said Baby "I will be burnt, I will be like..." -- then pausing, she looks around for an appropriate simile, exclaiming after an instant with delight "I will be like a kettle if I am burnt with hot water." I thought it funny and witty. Yesterday Julia said "Shall I go back to London town?" To our surprise she said "yes." "Why?" asked Dardy. "To bring Papa back," said Baby. "Which do you love best, Papa or Auntie Dardy?" asked Julia. Baby looked very thoughtful for an instant as if trying to understand the double question, then said sturdily "I love Papa best." She is very fond of Julia.]

[Julia was the wife of James, son of Percy, son of Mary neé Dardis. Why she should be known as Aunty Dardy – if she was – I don’t know.]

Thursday 4

Holroyd came to breakfast. Helen Grenfell and boys came to lunch. Interview with dentist. Took Allan's photo to frame and dress to be cleaned. Letter from Louie. C. Celli called in evening. Sent newspaper to Mattie.

Friday 5

Called on Mrs F. Jones and on Georgina -- children looking very delicate. Weather fine and warmer.

Saturday 6

Very wet. Went to see Effie, dined there.

Sunday 7

At St. Stephen's. Charlie Celli dined here. Wet afternoon. Edward Feild called.

Monday 8

Went to Bow. Children rather relaxed by the warm weather.

Tuesday 9

Received two letters from Mattie, one via Hong Kong, posted the week before the second via San Francisco. Mrs Frederick Jones and daughter lunched here. I talked in spite of my teeth, though not quite naturally.

Wednesday 10

Went to Dudley Gallery, good picture by Leaern of Cheyne Walk, Chelsea -- a familiar spot in my childhood as it was one of our school walks. Ayrton, Holroyd and Effie dined with me.

Thursday 11

Enquired about wine casks in old neighbourhood of Blandford Square, called on Evegards and Blacklock. Sent newspaper to Allan.

Friday 12

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 13

Wrote Mattie, enclosed letter from Carry. Went to Highgate, called on Ellen Knight, saw Finley there.

[Press cutting: MARRIAGES: on the 13th instant, at St. Johns, Notting Hill, George, only son of the late George Squire, of Clarendon-road, Notting-Hill, to Emma Sophie, widow of Edward Nugent Ayrton, barrister-at-law, eldest daughter of Herman Althof, of Munster.]

Sunday 14

To church at St. Stephen's, dined with Ann and Samuel. Holroyd and Acton supped here. Effie at Clapham

Monday 15

Nugent came -- walked with him -- engaged making marmalade.

Tuesday 16

Took Nugent home, called on Miss Shurr who is in her 99th year, looking well and enquiring after all the children of the family.

Wednesday 17

Holroyd's birthday, dined there met Ann and Samuel. Julia came home.

Thursday 18

Went to St. Johns Wood about education for Lucy

[Part of letter stuck in: “……in a conversational voice “Do you like Grangeggar, Brubber?” Cleve is infinitely amused at there being a question about this.
Yours in haste,
Much love
L Sk….]

Friday 19

Went to Bow. Mrs Nelson called, and Pauline.

Saturday 20

Boat race. Called on Ann. J E H S arrived late in the evening

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's. Acton, Holroyd, Effie and W. Clifford called. Julia went to Ann's.

Monday 22

Dined at Mrs Pyne's. John went to Margate.

Thursday 25

Cleve came -- went to meet him at Victoria. Called on Georgina, children looking delicate. Went to St. Stephen's in the evening to hear Dean Stanley. Cleve much pleased with his sermon.

Friday 26 (Good Friday)

Went to St. Stephen’s. Walked to Kensal Green Cemetery. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 27

Took Cleve to see St. Pauls. Went into the crypt and Whispering Gallery for the first time

Sunday 28

To St. Stephen's, walked with Cleve to Kensal Green Cemetery -- tired.

Monday 29

Took Cleve to Wimbledon to see Mr Bonomi, saw all the family -- day fine -- many holiday folks all orderly -- not overcrowded. Wrote to Mattie.

Tuesday 30

Called on Ann -- thence by cab to Miss Shurr’s -- old Miss S. in her 99th year much pleased to see Cleve and quite cheerful.

Wednesday 31

Took Cleve to the British Museum. He looked at the Assyrian figures and coins.


April

Thursday 1

Went after breakfast to the Tower. Our guide at that early hour more brisk and intelligent than usual -- thence by tram on to Bow, saw Mrs Pyne -- got home at half past six.

Friday 2

Cleve breakfasted with Holroyd. I went there and took him on to the Soane. Mr Bonomi spent nearly two hours explaining the hieroglyphics and pictures on Belgoni’s sarcophagus to Cleve. Very interesting.

Saturday 3

Weather cold and wet. Dined at Acton's to meet Holroyd and Effie. Cleve returned home by morning train.

Sunday 4

Went to St. Stephen's

Monday 5

Went to Bow -- all well especially the children. Several new boys on this first day of term.

[Attached here a printed poem: THE DEFEAT OF THE AMAZONS (April 6, 1875) No explanation given but ‘Chaplin’ is mentioned in it:

Once more the country’s saved,
The foe is held at bay;
All honour to the brave
Who won the glorious day.

Who swore they would maintain
Each heaven-born institution,
And battled to sustain
The British Constitution.

What valour they displayed --
What pen can e’er extol it --
What weighty jokes were made
By Leatham and by Smollett.

And Chaplin for a season,
Abandoning "Isthmian games,"
Hurled back the bands of Treason,
Backed up by Henry James.

And Hope, that's man of churches,
When fairly under weigh,
With many smiles and lurches
Pitched deep into the fray.

Yes, deadly was the fight
In which they had to strive,
But the champions of the right --
They won by Thirty-Five.

So the women had to yield,
And betake themselves to flight,
Pursued across the field
By Hartington and Bright.

And we're saved from grave disasters,
Contrived by female hordes,
Who on their lords and masters
Had dared to draw their swords.

Who had dared to say to men
(The vain, presumptuous crew),
With threatening voice and pen,
"We're just as good as you."

Yes they dared refuse compliance
To be looked upon as slaves,
Which roused to stern defiance
Leatham Smollett and the braves.

And all the deadly courage
Of their manly bosoms rose
To guard the rights of men
Against their female foes.

The battle now is over,
The victory is gained,
And the triumph with the stronger sex
Has righteously remained;

And women still shall hold the place
Of idiots and of thieves,
Which is their very fitting place,
As Parliament believes.

And we're saved from revolution,
From rapine, sword and flames,
By the strength and resolution
Of Leatham, Hope, and James.]

Wednesday 7

Called on Effie. Weather cold and wet.

Thursday 8

Went to Exeter Hall to the hear Moody preach and Sankey sing. Wondered what there could be in either the singing or the preaching or praying to draw so many to listen -- many like myself probably went from curiosity to see why? Neither had any special power in music or oratory and the substance of all that Moody said I have heard better said by others, especially Ruishon(?).

Friday 9

Wrote to Allan. Went to Highgate and to Mrs Thorne’s at Totteridge -- all well. Letter from Mattie to Julia. Weather very wet.

Saturday 10

Went to H to see Irene who is suffering from inflamed eye.

[The beginning of my grandmother Irene Kate’s eye problems?]

Monday 12th

Went to Holroyd's to keep house during Effie's absence at Walland. Irene with bad eye and eruption on face.

Tuesday 13

Letter from Will.

Thursday 15

Reading "Life of Colonel Hutchinson," gives a vivid idea of the troubled times of the Civil War between Charles and the parliament.

Friday 16

Went to Lincoln’s Inn and walked home with Holroyd.

Saturday 17

Kate Skinner and Lilian came. Called on Mrs Evegard and Mrs Nelson.

Sunday 18

Went to Iron church in Palace Gardens Terrace.

Monday 19

Kate came with Lilian to Palace Gardens Terrace

Tuesday 20

Returned home. Kate and Lilian here. Letters from Allan and Maud who expects another child.

[Mabel Florance Ida Chaplin, who married Charles Nugent Hope-Wallace.]

Wednesday 21

Went to Fancy Bazaar for French protestant church.

Thursday 22

Went to Fancy Bazaar. Kate Skinner went to Walland Carey and left Lilian.

Friday 23

Wrote to Allan and Mattie. Called on Miss Saltwell and Mrs Haward. Went to Fancy Bazaar. J. E H. S came. Effie took Lilian to the Fletchers.

Saturday 24

Expecting Marion Clifford all-day -- she did not come. Ayrton brought Ursula and dined here.

Sunday 25

Ursula, Lilian and Nugent here, took them out, the novelty of running through passages into the Harrow Road delighted them. Acton called, also Effie and H.

Monday 26

Audrey’s birthday, took Lilian to Bow. The children very happy. Lilian slept there. J E H.S here.

Tuesday 27

Took Lilian to Zoological Gardens, observed a fine pheasant from central China.


May

Monday 3

Went to Walland Carey. Slept at Bideford. Letter from Mattie before I left.

Tuesday 4

Proceeded to Walland Carey, at 7 am weather so misty could only see fifty yards in any direction.

Thursday 6

Wrote to Allan and Mattie.

[Here another scrap about Baby: " Baby keeps so well. We met the little Benhams in a field the other day. They gave her buttercups, telling the name. "Where is the butter?" asked Baby after a good look at them. She tries hard to understand all conversation. Mr Benham met me, went out with Baby and talked of books -- histories of France. "What's that gentleman talking about?" asked Baby. "You can't understand, said I. She listened intently a little longer there and said "What books does the gentleman say he likes?" Mrs Skinner will be amused with this. Love to all, your ever affectionate child,
L. Skinner.]

Monday 10

Drove with Carry to the Hobby. Left Walland Carey, slept at Exeter. Weather very fine.

Tuesday 11

Left Exeter about 1/4 to 7 am and arrived at home about 1/2 past two o'clock.

Thursday 13

Mrs Brenner came.

[Another scrap of letter pasted in: ‘The other day when I told Baby of something she said with a smile: “Dear Mamma I must take you upstairs and put you to bed, I really must.”]

Saturday 15

Strained my heel. Letter from Allan asking me to take care of his boy in case he should be obliged to send him to England.

Sunday 16

Allan Skinner returned to England after an absence of 61/2 years at the Straits Sett’nt. In bed all-day.

Monday 17 (Whit Monday)

Got up but remained indoors all-day. Holroyd and Effie and Ayrton dined here.

Tuesday 18

Called on Miss James and Mrs Nelson.

Wednesday 19

Effie and children and Edith and children dined here, played and seemed very happy. Reading "Off the Skelligs" by Jean McGelow, prettily written - but wanting in incident.

Thursday 20

Weather stormy and wet all-day. Dined with Ann and Samuel

Friday 21

Wrote to Allan and to Mattie. Called on Miss Shurrs

Saturday 22

Called on Miss Caley. Weather stormy but pleasant.

Sunday 23

Went to St. Stephen's. Charlie C. dined here. Edward F. called, also Acton. Holroyd to supper

Tuesday 25

Louie and children came

Wednesday 26

Cleve went daily to Mrs Acton's for Algebra lessons.


June

Friday 4

Wrote to Allan. Called on Georgina, Mrs Norton and Miss Shurrs with Cleve.

Saturday 5

Cleve, Louie and Julia went to the Lyceum to see Irving act Hamlet.

Monday 7

Went with Louie to see Salvini play Othello

Tuesday 8

Cleve dined with Acton. Then went to India Museum. Florance, Kate and M A S lunched here. F. sang, Carina delighted and moved. Cleve was also much pleased.

Wednesday 9

Edith and children, Ann, Miss Adshead and Nellie called and the children played prettily together. Cleve going daily to Mrs Acton's.

Thursday 10

Shopping with Cleve. Louie and children left at 1/2 past 12 for St. Katherine's to go by Havre to Etrétat -- leaving a blank in my household which only children can leave.

Friday 11

Called on Mrs Dixon at Mrs Pyne’s -- saw Alice and Bernard. Wrote to Mattie. Weather stormy.

Saturday 12

Madame Schnabel called. Went to Church Street to take toys to be mended.

Sunday 13

Went to St. Stephen's where £411 was collected for hospitals.

Monday 14

Letter from Louie -- they had a very stormy passage to Havre of 36 hours.

[Attached, a letter: "Sunday.
Dearest Mama, The tea has arrived safely so Johnny had better not bring any more. There is quite enough to last me during my stay here. I have quite abolished tea in the afternoon. Emma does not require it when she dines late and I am better without it. Baby’s cough is much better today in spite of the rainy weather, and my cold is better too tho’ I have not got back my voice. The violent sea-sickness and I suppose a little cold too took it right away. By the way Baby was very patient under sea-sickness. She was sick whenever she was awake from Thursday night until late on Friday afternoon. When it first came on she was very frightened for an instant, but directly she had been told about it she took it quite quietly, only saying each time to me "Do you feel sick too?" The chief trouble was that she could not bear to lose sight of me for an instant, though directly she'd arrived here and was told that she was "in France," and at Etrétat she became quite calm and lets me go in and out without a farce. She noticed we kept on saying we were "on the sea" and asked me why we said "in France" and not "on France." She is much less tired with the journey than I expected -- in fact looks extremely well. Cleve is very rosy and clear after his bout of sickness. Will you send by J. two pots of Lieby for making soup? I think that the size we generally use is 1d a pot, but it does not signify so long as it is not too large a pot, in which case it might go bad. Emma cried a good deal last night and this morning says she wanted Emily and it was "all so strange," but she has cheered up now. Ever your loving child. Much love to Dardy”
On the same page a letter from Cleve: “ My dear Manah, We have arrived safely at last. We were all terribly seasick. Last year the boat was 20 hours, this time 36. Love to all. Goodbye from your affectionate Cleve”.]

Tuesday 15

J E H S came. Mr Skinner called and shewed me cutting from paper of Allan having passed his examination for Staff.

Wednesday 16

Mr Skinner dined here and left with J E H S, the latter for Etrétat.

Friday 18

Wrote to Allan. Went to Bow -- all well

Sunday 20

Went to Christ Church. Mrs Pyne and Willy Henvey called.

Monday 21

Received letters from Allan and Maud and Lucy. Child better, called on Effie to tell her - wrote to Miss S and Mrs S. J E H. S. came.

Tuesday 22

Holroyd came to breakfast.

Wednesday 23

Ayrton came to dinner with Ursula to stay.

Sunday 27

Julia with C Celli, took home Ursula. J E H S left for Southampton to meet Maud and child.

Monday 28

Maud arrived with little Wyndham from Madras via Southampton. Maud looked well -- full of suppressed emotion. The child very delicate like a little bird so gentle and light on his feet. Very intelligent and well disposed. Mr and Miss S and Effie came to see Maud.

Tuesday 29

Holroyd came to breakfast.

Wednesday 30

Went with Maud and boy to Dr West, much relieved to hear that he has no alarming disease. Doctor thinks he will do well with care and time, the digestive organs are the most affected.


July

Saturday 3

Ayrton dined with us and Ottie with A. Westby and Miss Skinner

Thursday 8

Went to Ann's with Julia, Maud and child to meet Ellen -- Maud thought her not much altered in the last 3 years -- She admired Wyndham very much

Saturday 10

Called on Ann, found her very poorly with bronchitis.

Sunday 11

Mrs Pyne called on Maud. Holroyd and Effie called and E Feild and C. Celli.

Monday 12

Allan S took Maud to the opera. The black nurse left. Wyndham very good without his mother - having been truthfully treated believed in me when told she would come home to bed. Called on Georgina with Maud and Wyndham.

Tuesday 13

Helped Maud to pack. Edith called to ask me to go to Bow, as she wished to go to Ventnor to assist Alice with her little boy. Rain set in. S Feild called.

Wednesday 14

Maud left at 8 am for Walland Carey. At home all day. Julia went out to bureau in the rain. Weather intensely wet, rain for 36 hours almost constantly pouring. Mrs Rollings called.

[So what bureau did Julia go to? Her regular work?]

Thursday 15

Came to Bow. Edith and children gone to Ventnor. Ayrton busy with exam of boys. Rain continues with scarcely any intermission. Wind North-East. Floods everywhere including Wye and Usk.

Friday 16

Wrote to Mattie, there being a few minutes without rain, posted a letter via America. Received letter from Maud. Reading Maurices lectures on morals. Send card to Julia.

Saturday 17

Wrote to Maud, sent newspaper to J E H. S. Walked with Ayrton, posted letter to Maud at Walland Carey.

Sunday 18

Went to church next to School -- with some of the boys. Ottie went with Ayrton to another church. Fine and hot.

Monday 19

J E H S at W. Pk Rd.

Tuesday 20

Went home, saw Julia

Wednesday 21

Reading in the morning. Walked on the Bow Rd. to Bow Church. Letters from Mattie and Allan. Rain, much rain.

Tuesday 22

Went home, saw Julia and fetched my full canonicals to wear tomorrow in honour of my Lord Bishop. Old Ayah called and I paid her 14 pence for Maud. Wrote to Allan via Brindisi.

Friday 23

The prizes were given at Stepney Grammar School by the Bishop of London. Ottie obtained 4. Holroyd, Effie, Mr and Miss Skinner there. Edith returned. I returned home.

Saturday 24

Went to Ventnor, Miss Joliffe’s, Rosmel House. Found Alice Grenfell well. Bernard much better. Ursie and Audrey well. Pleasant journey. Edith and Ayrton went to Germany.

Sunday 25

Went to Church. Service rather high.

Monday 26

Bathed and enjoyed the beauty and repose here. Went to Luccombe Chine in carriage with Alice and children.


August

Monday 2

John Grenfell and pupils left.

Tuesday 3

Julia came with Emily

Wednesday 4

Wrote to Mattie. Letter from Allan, forwarded one to Maud from him. Bathed.

Thursday 5

Send a letter to Mattie. Walked on E Cliffe with Julia and Ursula. Bernard getting quite well.

Friday 6

I bathed. Received letter from Edith and Ayrton.

Saturday 7

Wrote to Acton and to Mrs Nelson

Sunday 8

Went to Church, wrote to Ayrton. Miss Barker about parcel to Mattie. Same to Holroyd. Letter from Edith.

Monday 9

On the beach and in the town.

Tuesday 10

Bathed. Wrote to Maud. Weather uncertain. Walked on the pier with Ursie.

Wednesday 11
Went to Luccombe Chine in a pony carriage with Julia and Ursie. Weather stormy but picturesque and view good.

Thursday 12

Audrey poorly, found symptoms of Albumenaria.

Friday 13

Received letters from Mrs Nelson and Mrs Skinner. Audrey better. Bathed -- sea rough -- some trouble to coax Ursie in. Walked with Julia on the W Cliff.

Saturday 14

Wrote to Ayrton and Edith. Drove on the Apuldercombe(?) Rd. with Julia, Alice and children. Audrey well, no further symptoms. Walked on East Cliff and through the town home

Sunday 15

Went Church, walked on the rocks and up to the Downs. Letter from Miss Barker.

Monday 16

Wrote to Cleve. Bathed with Julia. Walked in the town.

Tuesday 17

Card from Maud. Letters from Ayrton and Louie. Went with Julia and Ursula in a four-horse charabanc holding 24 persons to Blackgang, very fine cliff - and Carisbrook Castle, an interesting ruin. Pleasant excursion, weather not too hot.

Thursday 19

Wrote and enclosed letter from Ayrton to Allan. Maud at my house with the dear little boy. Wrote to Mrs Skinner.

Friday 20

Alice left with Bernard for Brighton. Wrote to Effie and to Lucy. Went on the pier with Emily and children -- Julia too tired.

Saturday 21

Julia sketched. Enjoyed open windows having suffered much during Alice's residence here from closed ones. Walked with Julia in the evening.

Sunday 22

Went to Church, walked with children. On the Esplanade with Julia until 1/2 p 8 to hear Ld Badstock give a religious exhortation. The people are serious and singing hymns nicely.

Monday 23

Left Ventnor at 1/2 p 9 by train via Ryde with Julia children and Emily. Weather very fine, arrived at home about 3 o'clock -- all very pleasant after the missing of apartments but longed for the bright landscape and sweet air and flowers.

Tuesday 24

Effie called and children. Irene very well. Nugent not looking quite so healthy. Received note from C. Celli.

Wednesday 25

Holroyd and Nugent called, also Ann. C. Celli came in the evening.

Friday 27

Wrote to Mattie, walked with the children

Saturday 28

Ayrton and Edith came, the former looking very healthy. Children delighted to see them. Weather rather wet, but they took the children to Bow.

Sunday 29

Went to St Stephen's Church. C Celli came in the evening.

Tuesday 31

Dr Willis called from Japan, brought parcel from Mattie and two sketches of her dear child.


September

Wednesday 1

Went to see Miss Shurrs.
Voltaire's description of a preacher:- "He divided that which required no division; proved that which needed no proof; put himself in a violent passion with perfect composure, and then concluded -- upon which his hearers awoke and said they had heard an incomparable sermon.”

Thursday 2

Went to Ann's and with her to Bow, found them well. Ann made Ayrton laugh heartily with her comic impersonations. Holroyd called, and C. Celli.

Friday 3

Lent papers to Allan, packed things to send to Miss Barker. Came to Brighton and dined at the Stewards, - A Skinner and his friend Harvey of the party. F. singing in very good voice.

Saturday 4

Wyndham not so well as when I last saw him. Went on the pier in the afternoon with all the family party, saw a man float in the Bay undress and paddling himself about - a pretty thing apparently without effort. Wrote to Julia. At Florrie’s in the evening.

Sunday 5

Went to Church, sermon poor(?) pastoral and congregation thin. In the afternoon called with Maud on Mrs Dixon and on Alice Grenfell. Bernard very well. Wyndham better but very quiet. At St. Leonard’s in the evening.

Monday 6

Nurse going home. I attend to W -- as Maud cannot. Went on Esplanade twice. Wrote to Miss Barker about Mattie's parcel, also to Julia and Edith. Card from Julia.

Tuesday 7

Letters from Mr Skinner, Allan and Julia. Walked in the afternoon with Maud and children who had tea here. W seemed stronger.

Wednesday 8

Out with Maud. Allan Skinner left. Wyndham rather better.

Thursday 9

Out with Maud and Wyndham, have sent newspapers with J E H S's letters to Allan via Brindisi.

Friday 10

Out with Maud and Wyndham

[A lengthy press cutting, headed: THE POLITICAL CRISIS IN SERVIA: From our political correspondent -- Belgrade, August 28. It starts: "Before I make a rapid march to pastures new and quit Belgrade for a region not very remote, let me give a brief sketch of the present political situation. Since my last letter the Skupshtina has met at Kragujevatz and we hear by telephone that Mr Jovanovic has been chosen to be President – or Speaker -- of this hard-named Servian Parliament. He is a member of the Opposition, a "War-Radical" of considerable popularity, and his election is not a good sign for the cause of peace. So, too, the whole organisation of the Assembly, in view of its practical work, is strongly Radical. A new Ministry has become almost a necessity, and it will take office under a moral obligation to do something bold and patriotic. The only difficulty is as to how to set about the task. The Servian people want war, heart and soul, but the governing classes know too much to be very enthusiastic for a life and death struggle with Turkey. And much more.]

[The second is headed: THE BOSNIAN REFUGEES: From our special correspondent -- Agram, September 1. It starts: “ There are, no doubt, a great many refugees from Bosnia now seeking safety on Austrian soil. Hundreds, perhaps thousands of them have crossed the frontier within the last few days; but when you see it stated by some of your foreign contemporaries that as many as 20,000 Bosnians are now in Austria you must hesitate to accept the figure, or anything like it, as historically true. And much more.]

[There is a third cutting, headed: THE INSURRECTION IN BOSNIA
(by submarine telegraph) (from our special correspondent) Ragusa, Sept 8.
The Turks are reported to have lost fifty men in some skirmishes the day before yesterday. Two battalions marched from Trebinje to Bilek, a village to the eastward of the town, which it was thought desirable to occupy for strategic reasons, as threatening the rear of the insurgents. The Turks reached their destination without difficulty, and one ………..
The Consular meeting at Mostar will fail, and all because the insurgents have hopes of help from their nighbours. I have met men from Herzegovina, who say that the very fact of this Consular meeting gives the Christians great encouragement. The Great Powers, they think, must really mean something in their favour. The meeting has somewhat discouraged the Mahometan inhabitants of the province.]

Sunday 12

Did not go to Church.

Monday 13

Surprised by a visit from Mrs Pyne with Bernard. Letter from Julia. Wyndham looking better. Kate S poorly with rheumatism.

Tuesday 14

Went to tea with Mrs Pyne and Alice -- all gone, so proceeded to Mrs Dixon.

Wednesday 15

Wrote to Holroyd.

Thursday 16

Sent Examiner to Allan. Out with Maud.

Friday 17

Florrie called with Mrs and Miss Holland. Went to see May dance. Wrote to Mattie with Maud’s invoices via United States.

Saturday 18

Sent cheque £11.19.5 to Maud & same for Mattie -- also PO order to pay laundress at Ventnor. Louie family come to London and Julia goes to stay with E Taylor.

Sunday 19

Went to Church. Out with Maud. Florance dined here. Mr Skinner, H and Effie dined at W Pk Rd

Monday 20

Wyndham better.

Tuesday 21

Went to station to see Florance. Reading "The Dilemma" -- Indian novel in Blackwood. Florrie, children and Kate left Brighton going to winter at Cannes.

Wednesday 22

Received letter from Mattie. She and babe well, acknowledged receipt of small box sent in May through Whiteleys. Julia returned home.

Thursday 23

Sent newspapers containing J E H S's letters to Allan. Allan Skinner married today to Miss E Shelford. Louie, John and Cleve there and all Allan S's family: grand wedding. W. Steward came to sleep here.

Friday 24

Weather cold and stormy. Sale of furniture at W Steward, Silwood Place.

Saturday 25

Holroyd came with Nugent. I walked out with Maud in chair.

Sunday 26

Went to church in Waterloo St, after driven to Aquarium with Holroyd and Nugent, then to call on Mrs Dixon. Letter from Louie to say Carina has measles.

Monday 27

Holroyd and Nugent with W Steward left after breakfast.

Tuesday 28

Did not go out. Weather cold and raw. Letters from Allan and Louie.

[In this page there is a lengthy press cutting headed: THE ARCTIC EXPEDITION: letter from Commander Markham, HMS Alert, off Cape Dudley Digges, July 25, 1875: “I think a passage from Upernivik to Cape Yak is quite without precedent. Captain Nares adhered to his original determination of giving up Melville Bay and trying the Middle Passage. We left Upernivik at eight o'clock last Thursday evening, and the following morning, on account of a dense fog, attempted to anchor in a small Bay near the island of Kingitok, and within a mile or two of the settlement, a man in a kayak from that place actually piloting us in; but he was evidently ignorant of the pilotage, for we ran on to a rock and remained immovable for five hours, getting off, however, without any difficulty at high water. And much more.]


October

Sunday 3

Very wet, went to Church close by old Jackson (?)divinity by an old parson one of sermons of his youth and long ex-tempore prayers before and after. Maud complaining of pain, preparations made but all (?) off

Monday 4

Today she was up and about and went out in a chair.

Tuesday 5

Maud pretty well again. Wyndham much improving in health. Wrote to Mattie.

[A press cutting headed: EXECUTION OF HENRY WAINWRIGHT which started: "Henry Wainwright was hanged in Newgate yesterday morning, as the clocks were striking eight. The arrangements for the execution were of the most decorous character, and all the more revolting circumstances formerly attendant upon the public hanging of a man were conspicuously absent from the scene. There was no spectacle made of the pinioning, and only for a moment was the full figure of the doomed man exposed to the gaze of the curious. Persons authorised by the Sheriffs to be present at the execution were admitted between half past seven and a quarter to eight, and were conducted through the prison to the chapel-yard. Here a space was railed off, beyond which they were not allowed to pass. In the right-hand corner of the yard stood the gallows, which, as far as might be seen from behind the barricade, was composed simply of a beam running across a shed. The shed was boarded up for a space of about three feet from the floor, and was thence open to the roof, after the fashion of a shop-front with the windows taken out. From the beam depended a short iron chain painted black, and to this was attached a strong hempen rope knotted and looped. One or two policemen walked about within the barricade, whilst in the outer portion of the courtyard the crowd, which by eight o'clock had grown till there were about a hundred present, clustered, leaning against the barricade, silently waiting till the shed opposite should be tenanted.

The bell had been tolling slowly ever since the spectators entered the yard; but just as the whisper went about that it was "a minute to 8," the bell rang out with a deeper and more solemn sound. On the first stroke of the hour a door opposite the shed, and distant a few paces from it, opened, and thence issued the expected prossession. First came the Governor of the jail, then Henry Wainwright with a warder at his side, and Marwood, the executioner, close at hand. Next walked the chaplain in his gown, and bringing up the rear came Mr Sheriffs Knight, Mr Sheriff Breffit, and Messrs Baylis and Crawford, the Under-Sheriffs. Wainwright was neatly dressed in black, his hair and beard carefully brushed trimmed. He was pinioned with broad leather straps, but these bound only his arms, and his legs being free, he walked with a firm step wither the little party led him. Following the directions of Marwood he docilely placed himself beneath the gallows, facing outward toward the yard. But he never raised his eyes or lifted his head, or by the movement of a muscle disturbed the impression that he was as a man in a dream. There was no pallor on his face and no agitation in his manner, and it was easy to believe what was said afterwards by the doctor, that "when, half-an-hour before the execution, he felt Wainwright’s pulse it was cooler than his own."

He stood thus with downcast eyes for what seemed a full minute, though it was probably but a few seconds, and then the silence was broken by the voice of the chaplain reciting passages from the Burial Service. Whilst this was proceeding Marwood was adjusting the rope, and as the chaplain uttered the words "Man that is born of woman hath but a short time to live," the hangman, producing a white hood, slipped it over the head of the man for whom the passage had such terrible literalness. The voice of the chaplain was heard through a few more sentences, and then, with a crash of falling timber as the trap doors flew back, the half figure of a man with a white cap drawn over the face and head, suddenly vanished from the sight of the little crowd pressing around the barricade, and there was to be seen where it had stood only the new white hempen rope slowly swinging to and fro. Wainwright was dead, dying almost without a struggle, and having met his fate without weakness and without bravado. When an hour later his body was cut down and laid in a shell, pending the coroner's inquest, his face presented an appearance as placid as if he had died in his bed. Shortly after noon the shell was filled up with quicklime, the lid screwed down, and the box buried amid the nameless graves that lie beneath one of the corridors of Newgate, and hold the ashes of all the memorable murderers who have died in Newgate during the past half-century.

Another short press cutting reads as follows: “The Convicts Wainwright: A statement was published yesterday by most of our contemporaries professing to give the substance of communication said to have been addressed by Henry Wainwright to the Home Office. Though called a confession, it really amounted to a denial of the guilt of the alleged writer, and a formal accusation of a living person as the murderer. We therefore deemed it improper for publication, there being no evidence of the truth of its contents, nor of the fact that the document had actually been addressed to the Home Secretary. We are now informed that "statements from both the convicts, Henry and Thomas Wainwright, have been received at the Home Office, but that it has always been the practice of that office, in the interests of public justice, not to make public to contents of such statements, and that the Secretary of State thinks it unwise to break through so salutary a rule.""]

Wednesday 6

Maud feeling pain but up to breakfast and out very (?) but went out in chair for a short time. A good deal of pain at intervals all night but………

Thursday 7

After breakfast up and about. The doctor came, advised her to go upstairs soon. She finished and posted letter to Allan and after tea went up to bed. Baby girl born at ½ p 10, a remarkably fine pretty infant. Weather fine.

[The baby - Mabel Florance Ida Chaplin]

Friday 8

Wrote to tell Allan and others of birth. Wyndham pleased with his sister, the novelty of the relationship amused him -- his first idea was to show her "papa" (the photo) and when she cried to get her pictures to look at. He thought she was looking at him the first time he saw her open her eyes. Went out with Wyndham.

Saturday 9

Maud and baby going on well. Weather very cold and stormy. Went about the town.

Sunday 10

Went to Congregational Church, North Street. Walked with Wyndham and Maud(?).

Thursday 14

The Duke of Buckingham went to Madras as Governor. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 16

Called on Mrs Dixon, all out.

Sunday 17

Went to Church in Montpellier Road, a good practical sermon from Mr Vaughan.

Monday 18

Very cold

[Press cutting: THE SHAH’S LETTER TO THE POPE (from our own correspondent) Rome, Oct 18.
The Osservatore Romano of this evening publishes, from the original Persian, a literal translation of the letter which his Imperial Majesty the Shah caused to be presented to his Holiness on the 8th instant, at the solemn audience vouchsafed to his Excellency General Nazare-Agà, Envoy Extraordinary of his Imperial Majesty to his Holiness:

“To his Holiness, most venerable and most illustrious the Pope, Messiah-like in character, educated like the inhabitants of the heavenly world. May he be strengthened by the grace of the Lord. To us, animated by sentiments of sincere friendship, there has come the amicable and venerated letter of your Holiness of angelic endowments, a letter written by you in the abundance of your friendship, and confided to his eminence the most honourable Augustine, Archbishop of Heracles, your messenger to us, together with gifts, dear and valued pledges, and most distinguished memorials, calculated to be always a motive to us to increase our affection. (and much more).

Tuesday 19

Called on Mrs Dixon. Heard of Mary Pyne’s serious illness. Wrote to Ayrton, his birthday. Weather very wet and mild.

Wednesday 20

Dr Barker called.

[Part of a letter from Holroyd loose in this page: " October 28 – ‘75. Irene has just come down: you will find her much advanced in her talking and her collar-bone is now mended though with a slight lump on it. Effie repeated Jack and Gill to her and she amended the line "and broke his crown" by saying "no Mama, "and broke his collar bone." Nugent has a little cough but otherwise is in great (?) I have bought a large map of the world for his benefit and we are tracing the Prince’s journey to India with astonishing loyalty! He said the other day reflectively that he supposed I had done growing and the only "growingses" I should do would be to grow old. He has been amusing himself by painting some pictures in (?) graphic.
We are going to have workmen in the house to remove the skylight in Effie's room and slate it over, for I find that it makes the room so cold in winter as to be useless. I have also to get the pipes of the bath altered as some patches were appearing on the drawing-room ceiling and I feared the rafters would get rotten.
I have just asked Irene what she would like me to say to you and she tells me to say "I love Granny."
Mrs Brenner has sent her a very pretty little muff of opossum fur.
Love to Maud and Wyndham. Your affectionate son
Holroyd Chaplin.]

Thursday 21

Wrote to Allan and to Mattie via United States. Maud not quite so well.

Sunday 24

To Church in Montpellier Road when Mr Vaughan very good. Wrote to Mrs Pyne.

Monday 25

Letter from Allan. Weather very cold

Tuesday 26

Dr Barker called, Wyndham better.

Thursday 28

Walked and met Miss James -- very anxious about M(?) Pyne.

Friday 29

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 30

Went to Hastings to lodgings at 13 York Buildings with Louie, Cleve and Carina. Took Wyndham and nurse -- found all well, saw the castle with Cleve.

Sunday 31

Went to All Saints, walked across the W Hill with Cleve.


November

Monday 1

Cleve took the servants to see the Castle

Tuesday 2

Louie and Cleve went to Battle Abbey. Wyndham’s nurse returned to Brighton.

Wednesday 3

Weather cold

Thursday 4

Weather very fine, drove to St. Leonard’s with the children.

Friday 5

Went to Brighton with Wyndham and Cleve who went to the Aquarium. Rained much. Returned home with Cleve by evening train, found Julia well.

Saturday 6

Shopping with Cleve

Sunday 7

Went to St. Stephen's. After dinner Julia went to Bow, I with Cleve to Kent Terrace to take leave of Constance Baines before going to Bombay -- called on Mrs Nelson -- all well.

Monday 8

Shopping in the morning. Letter from Mattie. Took Cleve to school at Bow.

Tuesday 9

Wrote to Mattie via US. Called on Miss L. Shurr -- the old lady much aged and rather ailing.

Thursday 11

Called on Ann -- did not see them.

Friday 12

Nugent came to stay here. Called on Josephine -- children well.

Sat 13

Weather very wet, dined with Holroyd

Sunday 14

Went to St. Stephen's. Julia went to Bow, saw Cleve -- who was happy. Acton called also Edward Feild and Holroyd.

Monday 15

Nugent went home. Called at Ashley House, saw Allan S. and his bride -- a very pleasing person, sensible and well mannered, bright and amiable I fancy.

[Always Skinners at Ashley House and many of them, so I am more sure that this is Allan Maclean Skinner’s London home.]

Wednesday 17

Edith and children and Ann came to lunch. Ursie remained here.

Thursday 18

Went with Ursie to Highgate. Eleanor sadly declining but cheerful and sweetly sympathetic as usual. Nellie well as usual. Weather very fine and warm

Friday 19

Took Ursula to tea at Georgina's, sent newspaper Examiner to Allan. J E H S. dined and slept here.

Saturday 20

Walked with Ursie to Edgware Road and back. Holroyd and Effie and Mr Skinner dined here. Weather cold and sharp like January.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's. Ayrton dined with us. We walked to Holroyd's, saw young McLaren there. C. Celli came in and went to Bow with Ayrton. Julia called at Ann's.

Monday 22

Took Ursula to Kensington Museum

Tuesday 23

Called on Mrs Charles. Shopping.

Wednesday 24

Took Ursula home, saw Cleve -- looking well. Returned late. Letters from Maud and Allan.

Thursday 25

Shopping at Whiteley’s

Friday 26

Wrote to Allan. Went to see Mrs Whichcote, found her well at 80 years of age, younger apparently than many at 70 -- due probably to a quiet abstemious life. Heard from her of Mr Saltwell's death. Julia called on Georgina. Weather very cold.

Saturday 27

Called on Mrs Pyne, saw two Grenfell boys -- Arthur like a sheep, gentle and simple looking.

Sunday 28

At St. Stephen's. Very wet. Julia to Bow. Acton called. Holroyd and Nugent.

Tuesday 30

To Bow, Ursie’s birthday. Wrote to Will and Mattie.


December

Wednesday 1

Walked to Mrs Pynes, dined there. Mary still very ill.

Thursday 2

At home all day -- weather very inclement. Wrote to Louie. Fall of snow.

Friday 3

All beautiful with a gentle fall of three inches of snow -- and no wind to disturb it. Went to Whiteley’s. Sent paper to Allan.

Sunday 5

Went to St. Stephen's. Walked to Holroyd's, met them and returned home. Julia to the Feilds. C. Celli called. Weather fine -- frosty.

Monday 6

Maud's babe christened Mabel Florence Ida at St. Michael’s, Brighton. Cleve and Henry came to dinner -- all well. Ottie in limbo(?). They walked out after dinner and returned to Bow in evening. Weather very bad.

Tuesday 7

Called on Mrs Pyne and Mrs Nelson. Heavy fall of snow.

Wednesday 8

Out for a short walk in the Grove and Queen’s Road. Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 9

Called on Miss Skinner, saw Mr S. with a cold trying to keep warm by a little gas stove -- pleasant as usual. Weather fine -- streets disgracefully kept - with all our civilization it seems to be no one’s business to clean them. The poor horses passing through the snow. Posted drawings of Mattie’s child to (?).

Friday 10

Mrs Pyne and little Grenfell boys lunched here, walked part of the way back with them. Streets a sort of continued puddle. Posted newspaper to Allan.

Saturday 11

Did not go out. Josephine Blake and children called.

[At this point a press cutting headed: THE THRONE OF SPAIN: MANIFESTO OF PRINCE ALFONSO: Prince Alfonso, son of the ex-Queen Isabella of Spain, has issued the following manifesto in reply to various letters of congratulation forwarded to him on his birthday a short time since: “I have received from Spain a great number of congratulations upon the anniversary of my birth, and some from countrymen of ours now resident in France. I desire to convey to you, as well as to all those who have congratulated me, the expression of my gratitude, and also that of my opinions. All who have written to me show themselves equally convinced that the re-establishment of the Constitutional Monarchy can alone put an end to the oppression, to the uncertainty, and to the cruel disturbances experienced by Spain. I am told that this is recognised by the majority of our compatriots, and that before long all those who are sincere will be with me, whatever may have been their political antecedents, feeling sure that they have to fear no exclusion from a new and unprejudiced Monarch, or from a system which is imposed today, simply because it represents union and peace. I know not when or how, if ever, this hope is to be realised. I can only say that I will omit nothing to make myself worthy of the difficult mission of re-establishing in our noble country legal order and political liberty at the same time as concord, if God in His high designs confides it to me. In virtue of the spontaneous and solemn abdication of my august mother, whose generosity is only equalled by her misfortune, I am the sole representative of Monarchical right in Spain. And much more.]

Sunday 19

At St. Stephen's. Julia went to Bow.

Monday 20

Went to Bow.

Wednesday 22

Went to Effie’s, saw her and Nugent. Acton called.

Friday 24

Wrote to Allan

Sat 25

Called on Allan Skinner and wife.

Sunday 26

At St. Stephen's. Holroyd called.

Monday 27

Dined at Mrs Pynes. Ayrton, Edith and children there. Julia to Highgate. Holroyd and Nugent called.

Tuesday 28

Called on Ann, saw Josephine

[Written neatly on the Memoranda 1875 page, the following:
"One Xmas day during a heavy gale, I wrapped my cloak around me, and started off with my telescope to walk upon the cliffs. Coming to the other side of the Island ("Pappa Westra"), on which the surf was beating violently, I observed a vessel a few miles off fire a signal of distress. I hastened to the nearest point, and with the help of my glass perceived she was Dutch built, and that, having lost her rudder, she was quite unmanageable. She fired several guns at short intervals and my(?) people came in large numbers to give assistance. But the surf was so fearful that nothing could be done. No boat could have lived a moment in such a sea. We were all utterly helpless. As the vessel drifted towards us, I could see the whole tragedy as distinctly as if it had been acted upon the stage. Immediately below me were a number of my fellow creatures, now alive and in health, and in a few moments they would all be mangled corpses. I could make out the expression of their features, and see in what manner each was preparing for inevitable death. But whether they climbed up into the shrouds, or held by ropes on deck while the sea was washing over the bulwarks, their fate was the same. The first wave lifted the vessel so high that I almost thought it would have placed her on the land. She fell back, keel upwards. The next wave struck her with such terrific force against the cliffs that she was shivered at once into a thousand pieces; hardly two planks held together. It seemed as if she had been made of glass. Not a soul escaped. One or two bodies, with a few planks and spars and casks were all that ever reached the shore. I was haunted for months by the remembrance of that heart rending sight".
This incident was narrated by Archdeacon Sinclair who heard it from Mr Traill the novelist, who used it in "The Esdail," and Lord Jeffrey not knowing it was true quoted it as an exception to his theory that the best things written were from true incidents. This true incident proves his theory.
From “Old Times and Old Places," Sinclair.]


END
Biography
98 Palace Gardens Terrace
Kensington, Middlesex
(London)
England 1861 Census:

Source: RG9/1908 Regn district: Stafford - Castle Church Folio 20 Page 1
Brocton Villa, Brocton, Staffordshire

Allan Maclean Skinner Head Mar 51 Judge of the Staffordshire County Court Born Middlesex, Chelsea
Caroline E Skinner Wife Mar 48 A Queen Counsel's Wife Born Monmouthshre, Rockfield
John E H Skinner Son Unm 22 Student of Lincoln's Inn Born Middlesex, Hannah Sq (Hanover Sq?)
Anna C Skinner Daughter Unm 20 Spinster Born Middlesex, Hendon
Florence M Skinner Daughter Unm 18 Spinster Born Sussex, Brighton
Katherine L Skinner Daughter Unm 17 Spinster Born Sussex, Hurst
Maud E Skinner Daughter Unm 16 Scholar Born Sussex, Brighton
Euphemia S Skinner Daughter Unm 13 Scholar Born Sussex, Brighton
Matilda A Chaplin Visitor Widow 47 Fundholder and Share Holder Born Middlesex, Chelsea
Clifton N Curtis Visitor Unm 27 Living on an allowance Born Sussex, Brighton
Isabella Gregory Servant Unm 22 Lady's Maid Born Somerset, Weston in Gordano
Mary A Gregory Servant Unm 24 Parlour Maid Born Somerset, Weston in Gordano
Judith Connell Servant Unm 33 Cook Born Isle of Man, Ballaugh
Emma Hawkins Servant Unm 26 House Maid Born Staffordshire, Castle Church
Thomas Bradley Servant Unm 26 Groom Born Staffordshire, Warslow
Marie N Pollert Governess Unm 22 Governess Born Russia, Riga (not British Subject)

1871 Census:

I couldn't find her - could she have been abroad? Check the date of the census and her diary for 1871.

1881 Census:

Again no results!

1891 Census:

Source: RG12/19 - Regn district: Kensington - Kensington Town - Folio 127 page 1. Parish of St George, Campden Hill
98 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington, London

Matilda A Chaplin Head Widow 77 Living on her own means
Martha Dickson Serv Mar 45 Cook housekeeper, domestic servant
James Dickson Serv Mar 46 Butler
Ada Gorham Serv Single 22 Housemaid


From the memoir of Mrs. Matilda Adriana Chaplin. 1899 (fifty copies only printed):

The Memoir of the early years of my late mother, Matilda Adriana Chaplin, was written by her during the last twelve years of her life, and will be interesting to members of the family.

Holroyd Chaplin, May 1899.

MEMOIR

"Any memoir of myself will not instruct or edify; but it may amuse those I love and leave, to think and talk of me in the few odd minutes which the pressure of life may spare them."

"My earliest recollections amuse me; yet I canot tell why one fondly passes in review little trivial scenes of childhood. Why should I care to remember how when I was between three and four years old, I walked one Sunday with my brother Frederick in front of our father and mother, from church, carrying proudly my mother's big prayer book, and for the first time observing attentively the beautiful view from Richmond Hill?" [See Word file for the whole of her memoir, and much more]

Of her marriage she wrote:

"My grandfather's one idea was that I should, in a worldly sense, "marry well" He was very fond of me and I of him, so after my mother's death, when I asserted my determination to marry John Chaplin, my grandfather firmly opposed me, though he did not interfere with my intimacy with the family. He would not allow him to visit me. He (John) would not stand this insult, and finally I was obliged to leave my grandfather's and board with a lady, Edward C. advancing any money I wanted till I was 21."

She died aged eighty-five on the 26th January 1899 at 98 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington, London, where she had lived for many years. She had six children and 16 grandchildren, of whom two daughters and two grandchildren died before she did.

Several extracts from the Memoir have been used as notes in the records of the people they concern. For the full text of the Memoir, which is very entertaining and interesting see [c:\alan\family\m_ayrton]

END

From Calendar of wills at FRC:

CHAPLIN, Matilda Adriana of 98 Palace Gardens Terrace Kensington Middlesex widow died 26 January 1899. Probate London 24 February to Holroyd Chaplin esquire and the reverend Ayrton Chaplin clerk. Effects £19,159 16s 3d. Matilda Adriana Ayrton

Matilda Adriana Ayrton was one of the children and the only daughter of Frederick Ayrton and his wife Juliana Nugent, and was born in Chelsea, London, in 1813.

She became my great great grandmother, and unlike most people in the story she wrote her memoirs and left them for her children. They provide a very interesting description of her life and times, and since she wrote them after she married you will find them in her folder at ‘John Clarke Chaplin & Matilda Adriana (nee Ayrton)’.

She married John Clarke Chaplin, a solicitor, in 1835 despite her grandfather’s objections. She wrote: "My grandfather's one idea was that I should, in a worldly sense, "marry well" He was very fond of me and I of him, so after my mother's death, when I asserted my determination to marry John Chaplin, my grandfather firmly opposed me, though he did not interfere with my intimacy with the family. He would not allow him to visit me. He (John) would not stand this insult, and finally I was obliged to leave my grandfather's and board with a lady, Edward Chaplin advancing any money I wanted till I was 21."

That must have been a very difficult thing to do at that time, so she has my considerable admiration. She had 6 children and 20 grandchildren. I haven’t counted her great-grandchildren, who would have included my mother. She also had a very long life, and died in London in 1899, the year my mother was born, 43 years after her husband died. I’m sure that she was a formidable woman and the lynch pin of her family, just as her daughter-in-law Euphemia (Effie) Skinner, who married Matilda’s son Holroyd (my great grandfather), became the lynch pin of her family in the next generation.

Alan Ray-Jones
Letters

To Frederick in India
[Letter to Lieut. F. Ayrton, Bombay Artillery, Matoonga, East Indies (Matoonga deleted, Ahmednuggun substituted), postmarked London 22 Serp 1829, from his sister Matilda Ayrton and his mother (it is included in both their files). Almost all the letters of this period are without much punctuation and written as continuous text without line breaks. Normally I insert paragraphs where the subject changes and add sufficient punctuation to make them easily readable, but these two, both written on the same large piece of paper, have been transcribed more or less as the original, as a sample. I imagine that this custom and the custom of letters written twice over with the second text at 90 degrees to the first, where a means of saving on paper or postage]

Monday. London, September 21st, 1829

Dear Fred,

Mama has already thanked you in my name for the parasol stick you were so very kind as to send me, it is very beautiful as are also the other things. Edward came home the Saturday after the things arrived (for he comes home every fortnight now he is Captain Ayrton) - he was highly delighted with the chessmen, he spent the whole evening in packing (?). Grandmama has given him to little box for them, in which he intends making divisions that they may not scratch each other. Acton and John have not yet seen theirs, but will at Michaelmas, they come home Saturday next. I shall be very glad to see their rosy cheeks, and I wish you were here to see them too; they would not be sorry either to see you though they are too lazy to write to you, except John, who has written once or twice. We have been staying nearly a month at Potters Bar with Mrs Carpenter. We did not go out much, for we have had such wet weather. It has rained everyday but yesterday, ever since the 29th of June, on which account the boys did not enjoy their holidays so much as they would otherwise have done; their principal amusement was on the water, from Putney Bridge to Hammersmith, one day we had a water party to Richmond, the party consisted of us five, Mr and Mrs Cann, Jane Basden’s husband, Miss Smith of (?), and a Miss Dakins, a pleasant girl, who you know nothing about, and the Waterman: when we woke on the morning of the appointed day we found it terribly wet and much feared being obliged to put it off till the next day. However, about 11 it cleared up and we set off and arrived at Battersea Bridge all safe, when Mr and Mrs Cann joined as and we all started at 12. The Merchant Taylor's barge was going to Richmond, so we were accompanied all the way with their music -- very delightful it was -- but unfortunately just as we got to Hammersmith Bridge we were caught in a pelting shower, - however we sheltered under the Bridge, where we all got out bringing up our things to dry, took each glass of wine, and made ourselves perfectly happy till the shower was over, when we all packed up and went off again, - much before we had gone far Mr and Mrs C. missed his coat and waistcoat which he had forgotten to put on, but we found it: when rowing hard to get up to the Barge Mr and Mrs C. tumbled backwards twice, to the great amusement of Edward and Acton, who pride themselves on their good rowing. We arrived without another incident at Richmond where we walked about till five o'clock when we went into the (?) with (?) appetites and tucked into Lamb, Ham, Veal Pie, French rolls, salad etc. which we brought with us, as if we had tasted nothing for a week -- indeed we had had nothing since breakfast at nine o'clock.
After dinner we washed our plates and dishes for we took them with us, packed them up in their respective baskets, and set off again home, arrived at Battersea Bridge at half past nine, delighted with our experience. I wish you had been there are -- just what you would have enjoyed. The boys say that Jeffreys the boatman at Kew always asks after you. Gay doings at Court Lodge -- a Ball tonight -- they wrote to invite us without asking us to stay so we could not go, besides Captain (?) is so surly. Georgina goes to school and likes it very well; Charlotte is in a very bad state and quite foolish; Louisa’s lameness is nearly well, she walked to (?) Bridge and back. Poor John is in a very bad way -- he expects to go to the workhouse, Turner and Townhsend (?) are both trying for the Engineers, Acton intends doing the same, I hope they may succeed.
We drink your health always and often wish you were here. Have you seen Louis Basden? He has sent Grandpapa a very handsome carved Tortoise shell snuff box, for which if you see him, do not forget to thank him. Grandpapa and Grandmama are both very well indeed -- the latter trots out every day. They both send love. Mama is going to write to you and I have said all I had to say so good bye, God bless you.
Believe me dear old fellow,
Your most affectionate sister,
Matilda Ayrton

[There follows a second letter on the same sheet]:

My dearest Boy,

I see Matilda has given you a description of our water party, but if we had been as long going as she has in describing, we should have been benighted. She looks all the better for her country excursions -- Miss Carpenter is quite well, often talked of you. Is your Perspectograph useful? I am greatly disappointed - young Guy (?) called and I should have asked him a thousand questions about you. Grandmama A. wrote me he would (?). I sincerely hope my dear child you will still keep well and like the climate. The (?) will take this letter. I should be saved the long walk into the City after this time as a receiving house for ship letters is to be opened this week in (?) it will be a great convenience in every way as the post office will be kept open till seven o'clock. I hear the bell ringing of the Park Men is to be abolished they of course are not pleased with it -- the Lady East is expected every day. I hope it will bring a letter from you. The Xmas letters have been amazingly dilatory this ano it is now a month nearly since they were issued -- though they are not due till January 1st. Those who send them have? nothing to do with that but should dispatch them by the next ship (?) as late as the 8th of April came a (?) ago. I hope you have been able to see about it -- everyone is so angry who has money in India -- I hope the money you so very kindly and generously laid (?) us has has not been any inconvenience to you. Walter has never sent any of his family the value of a pin’s head except the (?) he gives John - wretched young man I cannot imagine what will become of him. His family are with his uncle at Guildford -- you will be glad Louisa has so much recovered, she danced a Quadrille party Mrs Watts gave and I suppose is at this moment dancing away. She is a fine girl and always admired greatly -- Walter according to the East India Kalender was (?) they fully expect him next year. (?) Basden has sent a picture of himself done at (?). Tell him when you see him that he should have made the artist swallow it as a small punishment for producing such a caricature as I am sure it must be. Matilda says it looks like a Methodist Preacher. (?) has a disappointed us all by giving birth to a dead child however as her life is spared we should all be thankful. She has been in imminent danger -- it would been a great shock to her husband. They are such an affectionate couple. Mrs (?) is just come from Suffolk not at all well but looking very pretty her husband Steven has got same command up the country. Mrs B is looking very well. Mrs Bowerbank called while I was from home she read your letter with such pleasure she called the very day I accompanied Mrs C to Potters Bar. Matilda was received with such delight at Mrs Smith on Sunday – they all made kind enquiries after you. Edward Chaplin is married I hear she is a very nice young woman. M has not been able to go (?) her dear Sal yet – do you recollect that was your elegant appellation for her. Mr (?) called which he never did before, while I was away. The (?) came home on Saturday – Edward will not leave this quarter to the great disappointment of Master Goode (?) ………has been sometime at Ely and has returned pretty well dis you ever hear that Pratt was thrown out of a jig coming from a Boxing Match and was (?) on the (?) the day before he came of age to his 100,000 - the young man who was with him broke both his legs and was confined 10 months. Should anyone ever ask you for a school pray think of Ealing – I hope our long letters do not tire you in the reading . If you had time to write equally long ones they would not fatigue us. I hope Mr (?)’s account of (?) has not been (?) how completely Mr (?) shuts himself up – no one ever sees him and the house looks so forlorn. Mr (?) has a very pretty house it is about ¾ of a mile from us (?) the child is grown a very nice little girl Mrs (?) still lives with them she hoped Mr (?) had got to the end of his journey. Tell me how you pass your time do not forget to mention whether you pay postage for your letters as I would always write on the sort of paper I wrote last time. God bless you (?)
Your affectionate Mother
J.A.

I have written every month since you went. The Hallets are still at (?) Charles not having sailed – do you know John H? Tuesday morn a lovely day for our Walk. M. is quite delighted at the idea of seeing the City an event that has not (?) to her above four times in her life. Grandpapa and Grandmama are so well (?) in West Lane. God bless you again and again My dear boy. Take care both of your mind and body. The Dardis’s are quite well their money matters are quite they have now about 700 (?) with them. Your ever aff’t Mother. J.A.

1833 - To cousin Victoire in Canada
64 Welbeck Street
July 31st 1833
My Dear Victoire,
We were all much surprised to receive a letter from you addressed to my poor mother, for though I have not written to you to tell you of her death, I fully imagined that you would have heard it from Dudley. It was indeed an unexpected event, for she was quite well and out walking on the 1st of March, and on the 10th she was no more. It was on the 1st (Saturday) that she caught cold, the wind being easterly; on the next day she thought her glands were swollen, and sent for Mr. Moore, our doctor. He did not think it very serious. Then on the Sunday and Monday she remained in bed. On the Tuesday she got up and laid on the sofa, and though every precaution was taken, she took fresh cold and did not again leave her bed. On the Wednesday morning, the erysipelas being in her head, she became delirious; there was then no danger, but on the Thursday Mr. Moore, not being able to subdue the fever, called in Dr. Bree; but her constitution was so weak that they could not try violent remedies, and mild ones were of no effect. On Saturday (the 9th) Dr. Warren, a very clever physician, was also called. The fever then took a different turn, called typhoid or low fever. The delirium was still very great; a very large blister was put on her back without her being at all conscious of it, and oatmeal poultices on the feet. Mr. Moore remained all night, and insisted on my going to bed as I could be of no use, and having been up since Wednesday I was much fatigued, and slept soundly till about half-past five, when Mrs. Taylor (a person who came on the Saturday to assist in nursing) woke me to tell me that poor mamma could not possibly live much longer.
I had gone to bed in the full hope that she would have been much better in the morning, therefore, my dear Victoire, judge of my feelings when on going into the sick room I saw my poor mother, who but a month since was all health and spirits, with difficulty breathing, and her face so disfigured by the erysipelas on it that you would not have recognised her. I stood by the bedside till she drew her last convulsive breath - I did not know then that 'twas the last, but her face was so convulsed by it that I could look no longer. The next moment all left the bed, and I felt myself, as it were, alone in the world. You must have felt this when poor grandmamma died. Frederick was in the room, Acton had left it some time before, as he could not bear to hear her breathe, and poor Johnny had not the heart to come in. Edward was at Cambridge, - grandpapa had written to him on the Saturday; it would have been no satisfaction to mamma if he had been at home, as there was not an interval of reason after the Wednesday - she did not even know me.
Do you remember Chrissy, who lived with grandmamma in Beaumont Street? Fortunately mamma had just hired her, which was a great comfort to me, as she can be trusted. We had a very plain walking funeral - according to her own wish - on Monday, the 18th. We are now living with grandpapa [Colonel Nugent]. Frederick is going to be married on the 13th of next month to a Miss Hicks. She is a very nice girl. He intends to live in the country till his return to India, which will be in about a year and a half. Johnny will also be going out about that time. The wedding will take place at Miss Hicks's brother's house at Whitwell, in Hertfordshire. Have you heard from Dudley that I am going to be married to a Mr. Chaplin, a solicitor? I shall most likely live near Birmingham, which I am very glad of, as I never did like London. I daresay it will be two years before that, but you shall have a piece of cake if I can get it to you. I know a lady and gent. who lived at St. John's, very probably they will return; if so you will like them very much. Mrs Sweetman was very kind indeed to poor mamma when she was ill, and used to make tapioca and sago for her; indeed there are few such women in this world - so kind and so generous. Mamma has left you £5, which you will soon receive. Do you remember Louisa Smee? She was married on the 3rd of this month to a Mr. Lodge, a clergyman, brother to that Mr. Lodge who used to live with us in David Street. I am very glad you are so happy in the other world. The boys send their love to you. Johnny returns to Addiscombe to-morrow.
I have told you all the news, so now, believe me, my dear Victoire,
Your affectionate cousin,
M. A. Ayrton.


Memoir of Mrs. Matilda Adriana Chaplin. 1899 (fifty copies only printed)

The following Memoir of the early years of my late mother, Matilda Adriana Chaplin, was written by her during the last twelve years of her life, and will be interesting to members of the family.

Mrs. M.A. Chaplin died on the 26th January, 1899, and was buried at Hildenborough, near Tonbridge, with her husband, who had predeceased her on the 2nd June, 1856.


MEMOIR.

Any memoir of myself will not instruct or edify; but it may amuse those I love and leave, to think and talk of me in the few odd minutes which the pressure of life may spare them.

My earliest recollections amuse me, yet I cannot tell why one fondly passes in review little trivial scenes of childhood. Why should I care to remember how, when I was between three and four years old, I walked one Sunday with my brother Frederick, in front of our father and mother, from church, carrying proudly my mother's big prayer book, and for the first time observing attentively the beautiful view from Richmond Hill?* As we lived close to the park, I must often have seen that view, but I only think of it on that one occasion at that period of my life - perhaps I talked of it to my brother, who was very near sighted, and so disputed what I said I saw; thus it was impressed on my mind. Twelve years afterwards, at my request, we went up the river. I wished to see if this fine view really was what I remembered it. I walked on the same path, and saw the same ever lovely view, a perfect type of cultivated English scenery - all just as I remembered it.

My father was a London lawyer of small means, with a large mind and original ideas. The reason we lived at Richmond was, that he and some friends were experimenting with Merino sheep, and he, thinking that country air was good for children, managed this business near that park. Well, I suppose it did not answer. I do not remember our house there. My brother Edward was born there in 1815; and also Acton in 1816. Then they moved to Kew. I was born at Chelsea, 1813, where my parents were then living. After their marriage on very slender means, they lived at, or close to, my father's chambers, and there my brother Frederick was born in 1811. My first “house” memory is at Kew; at the church there Acton was christened, and John was born there in 1818.

*On this 21st May 1887 just about 70 years afterwards, the grounds below this terrace walk, bought by the town from the Duke of Buccleuch, is opened with some ceremony by the Duchess Mary of Teck - the Queen being Lady of the Manor of Richmond--thus this fine view is saved from brick and mortar terraces.

I distinctly remember my happy life at Kew. Frederick and I lived very much alone in the garden, which opened into our field. We used to sit on a bank, and he, who was much in advance of me, though only fifteen months older, used to tell me stories about animals, and enlarge my mind about various things. I remember his pulling flowers to pieces to show me how different one was from another, and his making patterns with petals on my hand; paper was scarce then. I think he went to school soon, in the day time, for I was often alone in the garden. There was a boys' school next door, and I amused myself by climbing on the wall, and sitting there to watch them at play. This was a stolen pleasure; no doubt it tore and dirtied my frocks, and was making me a tomboy, which was a dreadful character in those days - not so now - then I liked to climb up an apple tree, and sit on the top of the summerhouse.

I suppose the younger ones were too young to be out alone. I remember sometimes Edward in the garden, but he would pick the flowers. He and Acton were very pretty boys, I suppose, for visitors used often to say, "I must see those beautiful boys"; on one occasion they were in bed together. The visitor admired the contrast of the fat florid boy with a head of bright gold crisp curls, and the more delicate regular featured olive-skinned child; I listened with interest, and ever after admired.

At Kew we had a cow, and each, in our little tin mugs, always had some milk drawn. The little excitements of our walks were, an old sailor with a wooden leg, who drew great, and as we thought, grand pictures of fine ships in white chalk on the wall of Kew Gardens in the lane leading to Richmond. We used to talk to this sailor, and give him our halfpenny occasionally.

Then, there was the river, and a hope of seeing the Lord Mayor's barge. On some occasion I went into it and was delighted with its grandeur and gilding; I now think it must have been a royal barge, as members of the Royal Family lived at Kew. Sometimes the servant who took us out, chatted with the soldiers, who were often about; they used to notice Edward, a forward child for his age, I now know, he must have been; he was too eager to be shy, and little trifles were given to him by the soldiers. Once a live bird was shown to us by one. “Who will have it?” said he; “I will,” said I and Freddy at once; “I will,” said Edward, “please,” and for this “please,” to him it was given. This was such a practical lesson in manners that Freddy and I agreed we would always say “please” when offered anything we wanted. The bird was squeezed to death in the child's hand ere he got home. My father used to come home on Saturdays and stay until Mondays; his presence was to me a. great pleasure, and I prevailed upon him to let me see him have his dinner; I don't think I ever had any of it, as he was extremely careful about our diet; and our health in general was governed by him - my mother thought he knew more about everything then anyone else, and obeyed him in all nursery details in perfect faith. We went out in all weathers, well protected; our feet kept dry with over shoes of leather; there were no India rubber ones in those days, coats down to our heels, ears to the boy's caps, and a veil for me.

My general impression of my mother at this time is a tall lady, dressed in white, working at childrens' clothes and telling us stories, often jumping up excitedly about some mischief a child was doing, or some noise of breakage.
Just now I was told one Saturday a lady wanted to see me; my hair was duly brushed, I went down stairs, and there sitting on the chimney piece was a. jointed doll, the first my mother or I had ever seen. It had been smartly dressed, by my grandmother Nugent in London, and my father had brought it as a novelty for me.

My next happy memory is being taken into my mother's room to see “the baby” brother, John; I was just four and a half. After a while I remember feeling very proud of having baby on my lap, I sitting on the floor alone in the room, while the nurse helped mother down stairs. One day, just about this time, my father delighted us all by letting off some fireworks. With this, and his bringing us a poodle dog, his connection with our nursery life ends, and also, I think, some of the happiness of my early childhood, as I remember the pleasant sensation of expecting him on Saturdays, when we were smartened up a little, and my mother loooked pleased. I went to a day school, kept by a lady, for a short time with Fred. Was rather rebellious, I think. My father had taught this lady a little Latin that she might teach the boys, also, I have heard, put her in the way of teaching geography.

In the winter evenings by the fire-light - candles were expensive, and lamps were not used then - my mother used to amuse us with a story. After hearing it we used to delight in acting it. Our dining table had two large flaps. The cloth touched the ground when they were down, and under this was the house or cave when the scene required it. The only dressing up was a handkerchief on my head and our socks and shoes off for a supposed beggar, or water to be crossed.

About this time, while John was an infant - l818 - I remember going with my mother and him and the others to see my great-grandmother Nugent, who lived at Knightsbridge in a pretty country house, with a garden, on which site several houses have been built in the last six or seven years, two opposite the barracks called, as that house was, “South Place.” She was a small person, and used a stick to walk with, stooping much from the hips. She was ever after my model when I acted an old woman. She occupied a room in the house of her step-grand-daughter, Mrs. Smee. My next remembrance of her is her old servant Mary, who had lived with her from a girl, coming to Kew and giving my mother the details of her last days; the expression “she went out like the snuff of a candle” took my fancy; as we used candles
and save-alls. I never saw a snuff burn out without thinking of my grandmother expiring gradually somewhat in that way. My mother was very fond of her; she lived with her, and her daughter, called Aunt Peggy, when she was sent from India. (Bombay) a little girl of six or seven, and they loved her more, I think, than her own mother, who, like many mothers in those days, did not care for a child marked by small-pox, though otherwise handsome. Not so her father and his mother and sister, who loved her much. This aunt, who died before we were born, I have heard her say, did everything for her, and spent an hour daily over her hair; which curled and was of a fine gold brown. My grandfather told me, when he came from India a few years after, he went to the school (Miss Linwood's, at Leicester, famous for needlework, then very fashionable) to see if he could recognise her, and picked her out
directly, as he was sure there could not be another child with such hair She got the small-pox about sixteen. I think it must have made her rather sad and shy, for I was told she was a lively girl who used to sing. I never heard her sing, except to send a child to sleep - she could much enjoy a joke, and was evenly cheerful and patient, too anxious after my father went to India to be lively.

But I must go back to that important family event, - which happened just after the birth of my youngest brother in 1818. He left Kew without any leave-taking, just as if he were coming from Saturday to Monday as usual. He thought it better for my mother to avoid the agony of parting. Fred had been taken to see the ship and used to talk to us about it and try to make me see its great size, to impress me as he had been impressed by its size as compared with the river boats.

This last baby was rather delicate and demanded much care. Soon after my father left a servant was taken ill with small-pox; we had all been vaccinated so there was no fear of infection. I was sent up to her one day with a cup of tea. Expecting to see her as usual. I was so horrified at her hideous bloated face, that I put down the tea on the floor, and ran shrieking downstairs, frightening my mother, who told me afterwards she thought the poor girl was dead. To this day I can see her face, and remember my sensation. One day we were all hastily moved out of the house into some very small lodgings at a shoemaker's. They said that typhus fever had come on, which was infectious. A person was hired to nurse the girl: and she was to have plenty of port wine. All this was a trying expense, when economy was so necessary. She and nurse emptied the cellar. We children enjoyed the little lodging and the shop, and watching the making and mending of shoes. I don't think we had a sitting-room; my mother was always with the baby. We had no nursery after my father left us.

In the course of time the servant got better, and went to her friends, and we returned home. Martha (the servant) called about a character. I stared much at her poor white, marked face. Then there were other troubles. The cow got wrong, the fowls got into the garden. My grandfather did not like his daughter living alone, wished her to be near him, so he took part of a house just out of Baker Street, David Street. Of course we enjoyed the move. We used in turns to spend the day with my grandparents, and there I used to enjoy seeing “company.” I remember one day sitting at dinner - a chicken bone or something was given to make us happy - with some gentlemen, when the approaching coronation of George the Fourth was being discussed. My grandfather had two tickets. My grandmother was afraid to go and persuaded him not to go; so he gave his tickets to these gentlemen. I thought thern brave to go. I heard much talk about the Queen, and whether she would get into the Abbey, and the expected riot if she did not. Of course I thought it was much as if anyone quarrelled, and wanted to get in and pushed against the door, and the party inside would not open it

The Queen was spoken of as a very wicked woman though I could never find out what wicked thing she had done. I heard her called a horrid vulgar creature, and I thought when I saw an unpleasant-looking woman, she must be like that; and I wondered why the trades-people and others hired carriages and dressed smartly, as I saw them, to go and see her at Brandenbourg House. I had a feeling that she could not be so very wicked, but I never remember saying so.

At this time (1820) occurred the Cato Street Conspiracy. Fred and I talked this over, and one day he took me to see the street* and the actual house. I felt rather uncomfortable, as I was not allowed to walk so far with him, but yet I was glad I had seen the place, as people talked about it.

My two brothers went to a day school, kept by Mr. Ray, a gentlemanly man. Edward was under five years. The master took pains with them, and they were going on well when they got ringworm. Of course we all had it. To add to my mother's trouble, it was discovered that the nurse, who was good to us, and whom we liked, as she took us in the Regent's Park, then beginning to be built, and let us get and bring home clay, with which we amused ourselves trying to make things on our own little table, drank; and one day she brought baby in, as his mother thought, very ill, having fainted dead away. The doctor said he was dead drunk. It was then surmised that he had had many a sip of gin, which accounted for his puny appearance. Then I had bad inflammation of my eyes, for which, according to the fashion of that day, leeches were constantly applied, and occasional blisters behind my ears, which, of course, weakened me.

About this time my mother's half-sister, Mrs Smee (Peggy), of whom she was very fond, caught severe cold by going to Vauxhall in thin shoes, the same night ruptured a vessel in a fit of coughing, and died in a few weeks. My mother went to see her constantly with me. I used to enjoy playing with my cousins in their nice garden at South Place, Knightsbridge, though I was sorry not to see my aunt as usual, for she was very kind to me. I saw her after she died, and did not feel repelled, only sorry she did not seem the same as usual. I had, some time before been with my mother to see an old nurse. She had just died, and was laid out with a half-penny on each eye. I observed my aunt had no half-pennies on her eyes, and was hushed. I wondered why. We made a modelof her in clay, which we thought my mother and all of them would like, and were surprised at its being thought rather profane. It must have been ludicrous, for my mother looked smilingly at it.

*The name of this street has been changed. It is either John Street or Homer Street, running north and south on the south side of the Marylebone Road, then called the New Road (to the City), near Edgware Road.

Now my brother Frederick went to school at Dr. Nicholas's at Ealing, close to the parish church. Before my father went to India he visited all the well-known schools around London, to select one for his boys. He thought Nicholas's was the most liberally conducted, and the plan of teaching thorough, and the 300 or 400 boys independent and well-mannered. At eight years old they each went to school there except John, who was too delicate to go till ten. My father, with Lord (then Mr.) Brougham and some other gentlemen, gave the first idea of proprietary schools, whence sprung University (1826) and King's Colleges (1829); schools simply at first, colleges were formed there when the University of London was founded.

I went to a school in the Marylebone Road, which I rather enjoyed. They were very kind to me, and really taught me. I was fond of a baker's daughter, who gave me the crumb of a new penny roll to make bread seals with, showed me how to make them, and told me to knead the bread with washing blue to colour them. All this was too serene to last long I got the jaundice, the result of the nice meat pies and much butter, and sitting still more than was good for me. As, to all this, I was unaccustomed, I did not again to that school. I remember hearing of the objectionable mixture of classes, but I rather liked that. I heard of things quite new to me, such as “we keep,” i.e., we sell so and so and much that interested me, for they were not ashamed of their shops and they were as well, or perhaps better, dressed than I was, in brighter colours probably.

I remember the Captain of the ship in which my father went to India called one day as he was going out again and was to report about us all to my father. My attainments were so slender that I felt rather ashamed. Edward was the clever one, he could read quite well. I was proud of that, and Freddy's arithmetic. We had some money given to us and there was much nankeen for clothes. I disliked it. It was thought genteel then - even my sunbonnet was made of it. When the jaundice was over and my hair had grown a little after the shaving constantly for three or four months, during ringworm; it was decided to send me to a boarding school, for having only boys to play with I was becoming such a “tomboy,” and was never fit to be seen, except when dressed to go to see anyone or to visit my grandmother. But even there I found a boy to play with - for the cook had a son who used to help in the house, and when grandmamma was tired of playing with me, the boy was sent for, and he made houses and pancakes with cards; we played also at thieves: I pretended to rob grandmamma and he was the constable. In those days there were no “pee!ers” as we called them formerly after Sir Robert Peel, then Mr. Peel, who organised the police.

I was pleased to be nicely dressed, especially if I had a pink sash with a white frock frilled with muslin, and bonnet trimmed with the same colour - pink. I thought a certain spotted muslin bonnet lined with pink and trimmed with lace - once the baby's cap lace probably - the prettiest thing in dress I had ever seen. Little girls then always wore low dresses and short sleeves. Tippets and long sleeves were buttoned on for walking out in summer, and trousers were worn down to their shoes.

In these days children were generally kept in the background, and often heard their elders say “they should be seen and not heard.” My grandmother Ayrton and our cousin, the orphan child of her only daughter, Matilda, married to a Mr. Cater, who held a good legal office but left no provision for his three children, came, I think, to live with us. We rebelled against her wish to make us quiet and we could not help laughing when she exclaimed, “Julia! Those children will tear your eyes out when they're older” Victoire, our cousin, stammered, and Johnny began to stammer. This determined my mother to put an end to this arrangement, but I suppose she bore with it till she heard from my father. Johnny stammered till he was ten years old, when an elocution master quite cured him of the failing. My grandmother Ayrton went to Kingston, Surrey, where we went afterwards occasionally to see her. Frederick. her much loved grandson, often stayed there and did whatever he liked. I have always heard he was very like his father. Our great-grandfather Ayrton was a clergyman and master of the grammar school at Ripon, Yorkrshire. Dr. Ayrton, the musician, was her near relative. My grandfather came to London, on a pony, to seek his fortune, which he certainly found in the law, as he lived in good style in Queen Square, but took to drinking and dissipation, and my father articled himself to his friend Mr. Chitty, a name well known. I think we rather reversed this maxim, though we liked to gratify our curiosity by seeing every individual who came, whether visitor or on any business. We preferred the latter class as they were more gracious to us. I remember a man who cleaned windows always called Fred “Sir Francis,” alluding to Sir F. Burdett, so we thought Sir Francis a sort of great man, and wanted to know about him. When a stranger came we assumed he was from papa and I felt disappointed if he was not from India. Perhaps I saw and heard more than most children of my age because I always went with my mother being the only girl and was never left alone with the boys and servants. She rarely dined at my grandfather's, and when she did took me home about my bed-time.

My father was always spoken of to us as a perfect man, who knew everything, and could do anything, even carpentering, upholstering and shoemaking, which we thought much cleverer than writing an essay or review, which he did in hours that were not filled more profitably. The children came faster than the fees, so to secure a good education for them he accepted an opening for practice in the Supreme Court Bombay. My mother lived with the greatest economy that he might the sooner have made enough money to return. We were quite aware of all this. If we wanted to have things or to incur any expense, we used to he told papa would never come back if we spent so much. She only kept up the intimacy of a very few old friends, as the family cares absorbed her time. Now and then at her father's request, she would go with her mother to make a grand visit, with her footman carrying a long gilt-headed stick behind them. Fashions could not have changed then so quickly as they do now, for her best dresses were best for a very long time. I know that the bright green parasol of her wedding trousseau was still in use. I admired the form of it, the curve of the top tapering up. I know I felt proud to use it when she ever self-denying must have walked unshaded. There was one sprigged muslin dress unstarched which she never wore; to my wish that she would wear it, and my “Why don't you wear it?” she said so sadly or seriously, “I am keeping it till papa comes back, because he liked it,” that I never again alluded to that dress, and used, when I chanced to see it, to think of the day which never came when she would wear it. Ah! little thought she then of the sad future. How her fond hopes of this almost second bridal buoyed her up. Her anxieties must have been great, because except in their love for her, and their appreciation of literature, her husband and father held widely different opinions, which both freely expressed. She loved both; and my grandfather came almost daily to see us, and managed all business matters. My father was always writing advice and directions, which may not have been quite in harmony with her father's plans for her. No doubt the former attributed any ill health to living in London, though the part in which we lived was airy; but we always walked in Regent's Park- that being all on clay was bad for us.

In 1821 I was to go to a boarding school. An old and dear friend, Mrs. Bowerbank, wife of the Vicar of Chiswick, who often came to see us, at last heard of a school where I should be well taught by some lady-like excellent people living at Chelsea - Mrs. Smith and her sisters, Miss Shurrs. I went to their house with my mother, a house, not large, still standing alone up the Fulham Road, called “Thistle Grove House” then. In 1888 when I passed it was being rebuilt. Many little shops I remembered when at school are still the same. The garden has heen built over. A doctor occupied the house lately.

I liked Mrs. Smith's face and voice. Presently I was told to go into the garden with a girl, who was sent for from the schoolroom. This pleased me. When we left, my mother said Mrs. Smith seemed a nice, kind lady, and I agreed with her. It was decided I was to go there at Michaelmas. My hair was just growing after the ringworm shaving; I wore a cap like a baby’s of that time, with pink loops between the rows of lace. I was pleased with the trousseau which was being prepared for me by my anxious mother, assisted by an elderly maiden lady, a family connection always good at need. It was decided to have six of each article of clothing, except nightgowns and caps, of which four; and eight pairs of stockings and sashes. I felt rich with six new white frocks. It was winter, and I had some winter frocks, which I don't remember because they were ugly in my eyes, probably - coloured petticoats were deemed vulgar- I had never worn any in winter under my cloth frock, only trousers of flannel with cloth or other leggings buttoned to them. 'Ihe trousseau was packed into a new trunk with M.A.A. on it in brass nails, and I was taken to school by, I forget who. I hardly realised what it would be when the novelty of school wore off; so I only felt sad at saying good-bye to the baby.

I was backward in reading, partly from frequent inflammation of my eyes. Edward used to read me the parables and miracles from the Testament, Fred some natural history and bits from Goldsmith's geography. There were very few children's books then, and they were very expensive. We amused ourselves with Don Quixote and Pennant's account of London, both of which had pictures, and my mother some French fairy tales, telling me the English as she went on. She also tried to teach me the auxiliary verbs, but I was restive over these, and as I knew crying was to be avoided on account of my eyes, perhaps showed symptoms of an impending shower.

My first trouble at school, then, was that I could not read. I made such desperate efforts to read fluentlv that I succeeded in reading fairly by Xmas.

I liked Mrs. Trimmer's History of England at first, but cared less for it when it came to the Wars of the Roses. The domestic history interested me. After this, or at the same time, I read a juvenile edition of Belzoni's Travels in Egypt, which delighted me. I could not get any of my little friends to be interested in it. I read it alone to my good governess, Mrs. Smith, with a feeling that she enjoyed it as much as I did. I think, probably, my father wished me to read travels, as my mother often said he liked reading travels, and that I must try to remember my geography lessons, as papa would be pleased if I did; and he would like me to read natural history.

We were never in communication with the servants. There were some three or four big girls, young women in fact, whose friends could not afford to pay the full terms; in consideration of this, they were to make themselves useful, so they had charge of the little ones as to their clothes, watching over their preparation of lessons, and were responsible for their well doing and obedience - two were for music practice and to teach beginners. I was very fond of the young lady who took care of me; she was so motherly and conscientious, and mended my clothes exquisitely; outgrown silk stockings (no cotton tops then) were quite lengthened by darns at the toes; I was proud of her darning. Mrs. Smith taught me geography from a large atlas; this I liked, and wondered that the three little girls who were with me did not seem to care about it.

My only trouble was that the girls quizzed any peculiarity in my dress; even my having my stockings tied up instead of gartered, and the cap which everyone admired at home, even grandpapa, was the cause of much quizzing, and I was glad when my hair had grown long enough to cast it off. I thought the cap really pretty with lace and pink satin loops between the rows of lace, so I regretted leaving it off; besides, I did not like anything that was sanctioned at home to be found fault with. I think this is usual with children. One day I heard my mother's well-remembered knock at the door. I felt so inclined to cry when I saw her that I could not speak or ask about dear Johnny; in fact, she must have thought I did not care to see her.

How glad I was when Christmas holidays came and I should have my brothers again. Frederick did not think much of my school of only 18 girls, while there were over 300 boys at his school, and they were not kept in so, and had good games. Could I spin a top? I could do nothing, but I could work neatly - well, that counted for something, and I learnt more French than he did, he admitted, but my arithmetic was very poor and so was my writing, and he thought Mrs. Smith should he spoken to about it. Well, I knew he would not have an opportunity of carrying out this idea, so I did not mind. I found that he knew nothing of the history of England, which tended to balance our acquirements a little, though I thought him very superior to myself or any bigger girl at school.

We three elder ones went to a children's party. My grandfather, who wished to see me dressed, said I looked “a hog in armour.” This rather upset me; I felt shy all the evening, but was pleased that Edward was much admired. This party was not far from our house; it was at the Ottley’s, a name well known in Art; they were also very musical. My mother, for some reason - probably the expense of a suitable dress - did not go with us, a friend took us. When we were at supper the servant came for us. I remember Edward, who was being petted by a lady, burst out crying at having to leave the gay and festive table. Just as we got outside the door we found our anxious mother waiting tor us, for she feared the servant might not get us safely home - we might meet drunken men or be run over. Her big cloak was held round me. I had got rather tired of the party, and was glad to be with her to tell her all about it.

When I went back to school I felt rather sad for a day or two. Schools in those days were not so luxuriously appointed as they are now. The schoolroom was large, without carpet, a large table in the centre, three small ones in the corners of the room, where the governesses sat on chairs; we sat on benches without backs, except when we were reading to the governess, then on chairs. We always said lessons standing, each one alone; and classes were a. repetition, or examination on old lessons. I felt more cheerful when regular work began, though I was tired of it long before the holidays came again.

I learnt music on a new system, invented by Logier. The only merit of which was, to keep the hands in proper position mechanically, keeping the learner for months on five-finger exercises; then the finger prisons were moved to another place screwed on to a bar, the length of the piano keys. I had no natural talent for music, though very fond of listening to it when the airs were simple. As I required quickness on finger, Logier's was a bad system for me. I also liked my French lessons, though Miss Shurr, who taught us, was conscientiously strict, and aimed at perfection. She had been taught by an emigrant Abbé, and had a good accent and method of teaching. I think she took extra trouble with me, and punished me for every shortcoming, so that at last I was ill with bilious attack, probably from want of joyful exercise, and our doctor, whom my mother sent to see me, took me home. I was put to bed, and was ill some time with fever, my mother watching me day and night. At this time we were daily expecting my father's return from India, and one day the servant brought up a rather large letter. “The banker” said my mother; she opened it, began to read, gave a sort of shriek, and left the room. I was in bed too weak to move. I lay wondering what it was. I had heard of people losing all their money, and thought the banker had written to say we had lost all ours, like the West Indians we knew. I was not much distressed, and began planning how we should live, which amused me. Then I heard grandpapa's step, and directly felt satisfied that he would make mamma happy. Then the servant who had gone to fetch him came to me when I asked her after mamma. She said “She can't come in because she is crying so! Your pa is dead!” I could hardly believe her, for I had daily been talking about what we should do when he came home, and wondering whether I should remember all I had learned at school if he questioned me.

The doctor (our friend) came in to see me and ordered a mixture for mamma, which I always think of now when I smell ether. Her friend-at-need, my godmother Miss Smee, came and sat up all night, and mamma without undressing, at last, I suppose, fell asleep on the bed by my side. The next day the boys came from school. Edward was overcome with grief. I remember his being exhausted with sobbing, but do not remember about his brothers. Their mourning suits having been made, they returned to school. When widow's caps were brought for my mother to try on, she put one on, then threw it down on the floor and buried her face in her hands and threw herself on the bed. I thought how I could comfort her, and said “Papa must be happier than you are because he is in Heaven”. I had reasoned thus, but this effort of mine seemed to increase her grief, so I was quiet, and Miss Smee consoled her. It did not seem strange to me then that my grandmother was not the consoler of her only daughter, but I heard years after that she never was fondly attached to her. My grandmother was a pleasant, lively little woman; my mother was more serious and earnest, like her father, and was more his companion than was her mother. She did not take the deep interest in the children that he did. She was very fond of Edward, however, and was generally kind to us.

When I had recovered and change of air was advised, my mother took me and Johnny to stay with Captain Smee and his maiden sister, my godmother, at a charming house in a park near Robertsbridge in Sussex. They were the guardians of their five nieces, whose father (John Smee, of the Indian Civil Service) married my mother's half-sister. He had taken this house to please his daughters. The two elder ones were married, but the five at Courtlodge were only a little older and younger than myself. These daughters were Mrs. Lawrence and Mrs. Watts, of Battle; Mrs. Lodge, wife of Rev. B. Lodge, no family; Mrs. Barton, married to a bad man, no family; Mrs. Reeks, married a clergyman, had a family; Mrs. Brown, married Major B., Indian Army, had three sons.

I got quite well and strong after a few weeks of open-air life. I used to sit in their schoolroom and enjoy rambling about the grounds. I was much surprised at the clergyman, who spoke like a farmer and preached in his surplice, which was coarse and looked to me more like a smock frock. I was told he was a great scholar. His wife was kind to us. I was sorry when the visit ended, but as it was then the Midsummer holidays, and the boys came home from school, I soon enjoyed myself with them. Though I can well remember the dreary effect which the family mourning had upon me; boys at that time used to wear white trousers and waistcoats, and blue jackets and caps; and girls white or light frocks with coloured sashes; so that a family all in black was more impressive than it is now.

Our cousin Victoire, my father's sister's orphan, came to visit us, and we were taken to see some sights. The most interesting was the Museum at the India House, in Leadenhall Street. Tippo Sahib's mechanical tiger, which made such a hideous noise, was our chief interest. Then there was a picture gallery, the nucleus of the National Gallery, belonging to Mr. Angerstein. I was most interested in “The Woman taken in Adultery” - the figures seemed so very real. In due time we returned to school. I felt sad as I had been away a quarter, and I missed the little excitement which no one shared with me about papa's return home. I had been taught to think that everything I learnt would interest him, and now it all seemed dull and flat. However, when the holidays came, grandpapa took much interest in us all, and the boys always kept us lively, but my mother was so anxious about us, that her nerves must have been always in a state of great tension.

Frederick wanted to be an Engineer and to go to India, this was a shock to his mother. A cadetship was obtained for him, and he went to the East India College, Addiscombe, near Croydon. He was considered clever, and passed for the Engineers, but having been engaged in some row he was degraded to the Artillery. Mathematics was his favourite pursuit.

The next summer, 1824, we passed the holidays at Dieppe. My father, l heard, wished us to see France. This was a joyous excitement for us. My grandfather was rather nervous about my mother going alone with us. We were told we must be very good and help. The journey could not be made in one day, so we slept at an inn - “The White Hart" I think was the sign - at Brighton. Frederick and Edward went out after tea to look at the town. Next morning they went out again. My mother, as the hour of the starting of our steamer drew near, was afraid the boys would not be back in time. I felt very anxious. However, at last, just in time, they arrived. I do not remember how long the sea misery lasted. It was quite dark when we arrived. We were too excited to feel tired or sleepy when we arrived at an hotel on the port. We amused ourselves with criticising and examining everything in the room; the white window curtains smelling of French soap, the large windows opening “vertically” as Fred said. Presently came the most delicious coffee we had ever tasted with boiling milk and oh! sugar at discretion. As there was no church, we read together a chapter of the Gospels every morning. Immediately after breakfast I went out with the boys to buy some fruit, as I was supposed to know more French than they did. I was told to ask a toothless old women, who sold fruit on the port, how much those cherries were. “Les cheriqes sont' tro chouges,* ma bonne demoiselle.” Well, I did not quite understand her. The boys pulled me away and had a good laugh at my French.

*Les cerises sont trois sous

I began to think I had been learning it all wrong, and was ready to cry, but when I told my mother she explained that it was bad French, just as we hear bad English spoken sometimes, and besides the poor old woman had no teeth. When we went to a shop and I could be understood, and understand, the boys thought better of my French.

On the steamer we had made friends with a family named Benjamin, three or four little girls and a pretty little boy, whom I well remember, - we always called him “little Benjamin their ruler,” as he was the pet, and now knew it was the Jewish style of the fair Italian type. The Benjamins lived in a chateau, containing many rooms en suite, all on the ground door with rather shabby silk or satin, Louis XIV furniture and common coloured prints on the walls. Once this house was occupied by the Duchesse de Berry, widow of Comte d'Artois, assassinated 1829; it was outside the walls and when we went to play there, we were obliged to get into Dieppe before eight, as the gate was shut at that hour. No one was supposed to pass without leave, but for half a franc the soldier opened it for us. The first time we were late we hoped they would not let us go through, and that we should be obliged to sleep how we could somewhere, or at the Benjamins’.

There is an old castle on one side of Dieppe used as a barrack. There were then no houses opposite the sea, but a nice expanse of grass and a small casino with promenade attached to it. Mv mother took us to Rouen for three days in the diligence. It started towards evening. We children were all put into the corner, the seat was wide, Johnny being small and thin, was to sleep behind us. However we did not sleep, but made such a. noise that the conductor reproved us. We were glad to arrive. On entering Rouen, we saw some manufactories with very many windows all so bright with lights that we thought it was a public illumination, and were eager to know the cause. The hotel was in the Rue de la Grosse Horloge. We were taken to the Cathedral, the Enfants Trou?s and other places. Frederick and Edward went about alone. I remember we used to be amused at Dieppe watching the rats in the port at low water. Then the boat-building amused us.

While I was enjoying this free and easy life with the boys, Frederick and Edward thought it a good joke to tell me one day that Mrs. Smith and Miss Shurr had just arrived, and were at the other hotel; mamma said we must call upon them. I felt that I must henceforth dress very neatly, walk very quietly, except at the Berry chateau, and generally be quite a young lady; the boys walked gravely with us, my mother and me, to the other grander hotel, then said it was only a joke, and glad I was that it was only a joke, though I liked Mrs. Smith and Miss Shurr very well in their place, i.e., Brompton Square. I felt that their being at Dieppe was rather oppressive and schooly. In due time we were to return home. A carriage was hired to drive us in two days to Boulogne. We slept at Abbeville, and there Fred, who was studying fortification, explained to us something of the works and talked about Vaubun. There was some trouble to get him away from this fortified town. We went by boat from Boulogne to London, at the Custom House near the Tower, I think, arriving in the forenoon on.a very wet day. We stood in a row on a bench under umbrellas while my mother with Frederick attended to the luggage. My grandfather's servant came to the rescue, and we then waited in the coach. At last we got home.

We all dined at my grandfather’s. I was dressed in a silk dress colour eau de nil, which I did not think very pretty, but was consoled with a pink sash to be worn with it. Eau de nil was called the fashionable colour; I bore this in mind in case my schoolfellows should find fault with it. But I did not have to wait for their disapproval. My grandmother: “What an unbecoming dress!” But worse than that, it was painfully tight in the waist. I bore it through dinner, then slipped away to find the servant to pin it in some way; in fact, the grand French dress was rather a failure. The facon, too, was to English eyes peculiar; so was my walking-out toilet, but I do not remember what it was. Then came the Christmas holidays and Christmas parties. The best party we went to was at a Mr. Ottley's on Twelfth Night. There might have been about 100 there, of various ages. I.well remember seeing Sir Thomas Lawrence as he was talking to my mother, and asked her, pointing to Edward, if she knew who that boy was. “He has a fine head.” I had always thought his head was like some statue I had seen.

These Ottleys were a West Indian family. We used to hear them pitied for having lost so much by the abolition of slavery in the West Indies, but as they lived in a nice house in the Regent's Park, kept one or two men servants (black), and about three or four females, I wondered why my grandfather called him “poor Ottley.” It was explained to me how they had formerly kept horses, carriages, and many niggers. We knew about five West Indian families, and I enjoyed spending the day at their houses. They were nice, kind people, and spoke pleasantly to their servants, though I saw Mrs. Ottley box the young nurse's ears for being very lazy, as she certainly was. I saw her often sitting on the floor enjoying her dolce par niente, looking so happy, staring at us and listening to us in a vacant way. Then there was another West India household, the females (mother and her sister) were almost black; they were not visited. There were two daughters who were not so dark; one of them sang beautifully. It was allowed to go and see them, and I very much enjoyed seeing the, to me, novel interior. The peculiar talk and accent of the mamma and aunt, their queer dresses, a sort of striped calico, loose jacket, and coloured cotton handkerchief like a turban on their heads. They gave me cakes. There was always a smell of cooking in that house. The young ladies were always well dressed. My grandmother was good-natured and noticed them, but I never met them at any other West Indian house. The other families, I believe, were quite white and highly educated. Altogether I rather preferred the West to the East Indian friends or acquaintances. They did not criticise me, and made me feel more at home with them. My grandmother approved of slavery on Biblical authority, would not believe they were ever treated cruelly, though she must have known they were as a fact. I heard of Mr. Someone, who put his slave down a well. Ottley had a fine collection of pictures. His brother wrote the History of Engraving. Our friends were remarkably musical.

My friends at school were three sisters, named Chaplin, and this Christmas they invited me to spend a few days with them. Their father was one of the clergy at Gray's Inn, and also chaplain to St. Martin's Burial Ground, Camden Town, which was then considered out of London. My brother Frederick escorted me there, and was kindly invited to dinner. I was glad of this, as, except my schoolfellows, they were all grown-up strangers.

Before dinner was over, I felt quite at home, for Mr. Chaplin and his sons, aged 22 and 32, were very friendly. Mrs. Chaplin was an invalid, but not confined to her room. I remember she took me up to bed, and I chattered to her about France, which seemed to amuse her. I think she must have told the other members of the family I had amused her. The son (Edward) did not sleep at home, as the house was too small, but John came home to dinner and to sleep. At breakfast, which was at eight o'clock, he used to talk to me till his father came in when we were obliged to be very quiet, as he read his papers, but we whispered and giggled very sotto voce. I only stayed a few days, but those few days determined my future life. At home I had been accustomed to play and talk with my brothers as one of them, to be chaffed by them; but John Chaplin treated me quite differently, tried to please me, brought me a flower, a print, or some trifle, said when I left that he should call and see me, and I looked forward to seeing him.

However at the end of the holidays I returned to school. Those ladies had removed to 28 Brompton Square, then just built, but not finished, which pleased my mother, as it was much nearer to Manchester Street, where she was then living. She used to come to see me nearly every Saturday, and stay to tea When she came I used to run down to see her, then go back to finish up anything I was preparing that I might enjoy my evening. The conversation often turned on old times as compared with the then present days, Miss L Shurr having lived as companion, and almost as the daughter, of Mr. Plummer (MP for Middlesex, I think), and his wife (one of the Hamilton family), had seen a good deal of society, and many celebrated people. My mother would tell them stories of the French migrants, and their pitiful poverty, how they might be seen when Louis 18th lived rent free in one of the houses of the Duke of Buckingham's (then Marquis), in the fields early, like crows, for they generally wore black, looking for salad, and how a certain abbess always forgot it was Friday -- when at dinner - but these migrants were welcomed by the Tories, and some went back to France with Louis, and settled there under his patronage. Someone persuaded the Marquis of Buckingham's daughter to he a Roman Catholic, and she went with the Court to France; which much grieved her father; probably she thought the religion which had priests apparently more devout than the ordinary Protestant pastor of those days, must be the most in harmony with her heaven.

1828. In the autumn of this year my brother Frederick, who was much loved for his amiable character and good temper, left the India Military College, and went to India. My mother spared no expense in his outfit. I came from school for a few days to be some comfort to my mother on his leaving. We all dined at my grandfather's on that day, and in the evening he left with Captain Dardis, who came to see him on board at Portsmouth. My poor mother was in an agony of grief - it was but ten years after she had parted with his father - and this parting must have brought vividly to her mind all those sad times. I believe Frederick did not care much for the military life; he wanted to see the East, he delighted in reading of it, and he wanted to be an engineer, but at that time this was not a recognised profession, so he would hear of nothing but India He was in the Artillery, but after a. short time always had engineering work, till he was, when superintending the fortification of Aden, attacked by Arabs, and found his near-sightedness so dangerous that he decided to leave the Army, and take to the bar.

We passed some part of the next summer holidays in London. I remember John Chaplin taking his youngest sister Sarah, me, and my brother Edward to Vauxhall Gardens. I had often heard them spoken of as charming, though then on the wane and not much frequented, but I longed to see them. I think it was rather an expensive affair with carriage hire, as there was then no other means of getting there. The Gardens, with their strings of coloured lamps, small al fresco stage, peep shows, rope dancing, small fireworks would be all very tawdry and poor now that we have a Crystal Palace, &, &. Though I did not find it so fairy-like as I expected, I enjoyed myself. There were alcoves with a glimmer of light in each, for supping in off meagre little sandwiches and ginger pop which we had. I suppose stronger drink could be had. From this time I had a sentiment for John Chaplin, which neither J nor anyone else suspected, though I heard afterwards that his mother had said he would one day marry "that little dark girl." I believe now this "sentiment" was rather the pleasure of gratifed vanity than any better feeling I certainly did not appreciate his fine qualities for some years afterwards. I knew him better than others, and liked him better, but thought men generally pleasanter than women. Being used to boys I felt more at my ease with them; and I really think the men liked this, though I was innocent of any special wish to please them or flirt, but had good spirits. It was well for me that I knew and loved this excellent young man. I was struck by his devotion to his invalid mother and his generosity to his three sisters - his pride in everyone but himself, and his admiration of all great or good men; though all these good qualities no doubt influenced me less than his preference for me. My vanity, too, was flattered. My brothers frankly quizzed me, and told me of my faults, while he saw no fault in me, his desire being to please me.

I liked his father, - a very agreeable old gentleman, who had a great store of interesting anecdotes. He remembered the Gordon Riots; he was at Westminster School, and when there heard parts of the trial of Warren Hastings; he talked with much animation of great elections at Westminster, in which he said some of the school took much interest, and boys would get out in spite of punishment to see the great election. Westminster boys used to play and hunt cockchafers on the land - then very swampy - on which the whole of Belgravia now stands. I remember this Grosvenor property being redrained and built over. I have heard that there was difficulty in making a firm foundation for the houses on this marsh. Politics seemed to me very rudely discussed then at grand tables. At Lord someone's in Norfolk, where he had a living, on someone drinking to the health of one party, a lady replied, "True blue and none of you!" He said there was some risk of highwaymen in crossing Hampstead Heath or Hadley Common late He and his father, when riding, felt glad to be safely over. Then he had tales of friends who had been in Paris during the great Revolution (1793). One of these, who could speak French, saw them going to hang someone, saying excitedly, "A la lanterne!" (the street lamp). He asked what the man had done; talked to them, and finally they did not hang the man.

Mr. C. and his sister who married a clever barrister by the name of Holroyd*, were the only children who lived to grow up. Their mother was the daughter of one Von Stocken, Librarian to the King of Saxony or Prussia, and I was told he was learned. This couple died when Mr C. was at Cambridge, where he went on a scholarship from school. He was intended for the bar, but while at Cambridge fell in love with a Miss Theodoric, who was very pretty (Mabel resembles her), and went into the Church that he might sooner marry her. She was the only child, except a sister by a former wife. On the death of Mr. Theodoric there was some quarrel about the division of property, and I knew nothing of that branch. The other daughter was a Mrs. Vale. When anything was said or done that was thought mean or unamiable it was said to be "just like Mrs. Vale." Thus I remember the name. By his marriage Mr. C. had a very large family; there were seven boys living at one time, and four girls. When I first knew them there were only three girls and two grown-up sons; the eldest, Edward, was ten years older than John, my husband, an amiable man, but was less beloved by his family than his brother.

*Afterwards Sir G.S. Holroyd, one of the Justices of the King’s Bench

He was more selfish and less generous to his sisters. For a young man he had a fine income as a solicitor; his brother had been articled to him, and worked very hard in his office.

I suppose my husband was clever in business, as he was offered a good partnership without payment by a wealthy old Birmingham lawyer, but he did not know that I thought a very small income sufficed for those who married for love and had no views of a grand match. My grandfather’s one idea was that I should, in a worldly sense, “marry well." He was very fond of me and I of him, so after my mother's death, when I asserted my determination to marry John Chaplin, my grandfather firmly opposed me, though he did not interfere with my intimacy with the family. He would not allow him to visit me. He would not stand this insult, and finally I was obliged to leave my grandfather's and board with a lady, Edward C. advancing any money I wanted till I was 21. My grandfather was passionate and would not be thwarted, in other respects he was good and generous. I was very much grieved at this quarrel; friends did all they could to repair the breach, but in vain, for a girl to resist him was an unpardonable offence. My eldest brother was engaged to a nice girl, whose father was a country doctor. My grandfather did not object to this, why then object to my marriage, I thought, and my spirit rose? I ought, perhaps, to have been patient, but J.C. was too indignant to bear this insult, and would not endure a hole-and-corner courtship. He thought I should not like to live there, as we were not positively engaged. He said he felt doubtful about accepting this good offer. There was one condition, he was to be a year with a conveyancer; at the end of that time he thought be could offer with hope of family consent. He must have known that my mother liked him, and that she knew I preferred him, I felt sure. But then my grandfather might have objected. He had all the old Tory ideas about marriage. Position and money were to be much considered in marrying me. He was very fond of me, and thought me lovely enough for anyone to fall in love with. In short, he intended to marry me well.

In this year, on March 10th, 1833, my dear, good, self-denying mother died, after a few days' illness; the first illness which I had known her to have. I think she had really worn herself out with anxiety over her children, and her respect and love for her father, with whom she often differed, yet never openly opposed him. She had much feeling, and was shy and very sensitive. My brother Edward resembled her in character and poetical temperament

But I must revert to the time of my leaving school, an event to which I and a schoolfellow, Miss Knight (daughter of the Secretary of the Bank of England), often looked forward. We planned how we should enjoy ourselves with no stricter control than that of our affectionate mothers; but when the day of leaving came I felt sorrowful, for I was really attached to those good ladies who for nearly eight years had treated me with great kindness and conscientiously instructed me and corrected me, and carefully watched over my health. When I went in to them for a last private interview, and was presented with two very handsome books I burst into tears. When Mrs. Smith joked me a little I laughed and was altogether upset. Home was very delightful after the restraint and routine of school but it was not such happiness as in my day-dream I had pictured it. My brothers were all at school, and I had no sisters. Sorrow had made my mother serious, and the future of the boys had to be considered, so I must have missed the merriment of young companions. It was decided that Edward was to leave school and read with a tutor, and live at home. This made a pleasant change as he was witty and full of life, but he soon found this tutor inefficient; another was recommended who lived in Northamptonshire.

I was invited to visit a friend of my mother’s, whom I had not seen, at Bath. I had heard and read of the Bath world, so I should like to go there. Mrs. Liddiard lived in grander style than we did; she had a nice little girl of four or five, who was always an amusement for me, but she was not much with us. Mr. Liddiard was a clergyman; they were vulgarly worldly. When I heard Mrs. Liddiard speak rudely of a valued friend of my mother, and I felt too weak to speak my sentiments, I wanted to go home, besides, it was the Christmas holidays, and I wanted to see my brothers and enjoy their fun. But in those days a young lady could not travel alone, and from Bath was about 12 hours' journey, so I must wait for an escort. Then, not without tears shed in private, I resigned myself to circumstances. I was very glad I had been to the Pump room and to a public ball at those fine rooms, and was pleased to be able to amuse my grandfather by talking about Bath. I felt on coming home as if I had got out of unwonted restraint. The friends at Bath lived in more style than we did at home. but I soon disliked it all.

During my visit there was a desperate effort made to stop the balls at the fine assembly, which the so-called Low Church Party considered to be a haunt of Satan. The Reverend Mr.Liddiard had a good living in Ireland, but lived at Bath or Cheltenham, and was for keeping up the "rooms” and, of course, subscribed. I was to be taken there. I looked forward much to going. I had read and heard of them so much. The day came; at about seven or eight o'clock, the Sedan chairs came too - they were brought one by one into the hall, the lid was lifted, the front opened, and you sat in a snug chair, were shut up in it; the men ran the poles into the iron loops and bore you away. The motion was a little unpleasant. In a little procession we arrived at the "rooms." There was, is still I suppose, a very fine vestibule. As the chairs entered several together, a person held a large plate, into which each person dropped sixpence for "tea money.” We then went into the large tea-room, where many tables of different sizes were laid for tea. Having ordered it, an urn of the now fashionable Queen Ann form was brought, but what a funny old thing I then thought it - and green and black tea in little cups, bread and butter, and sally lunn. After tea, leisurely talken, we went to the ball room. I had never been in so large a room. There were two rows, I think, of covered benches down three sides and some at the further end on a higher floor, a music gallery at the side. I was introduced to the Master of the Ceremonies, who at once brought me a partner. The room was well lighted. Then there was a pretty octagon room for those who liked quiet talk and a large card room. I was told that in former years when Bath was at its prime, there would be two thousand people at the "Rooms." Perhaps there were three hundred there on that January evening, 1829. I danced away, quadrilles and lancers, all the evening, looked well at everything, to write home about it all. At exactly 11 o'clock the M.C. held up his hand, the music stopped, off we all went. Men servants brought chairs. The next day gentlemen called, and I did not like being quizzed about the impression I had made upon them. One I remember was a foreigner - I think an Italian - who was declared ineligible.


Extracts from Letters of Mrs M.A. Chaplin:

24th July, 1841. Mrs. M. A. Chaplin writes to her brother Acton:--

I am not a theorist in education: all I desire is that children should be constantly interested and amused in a right way, a thing which servants never can do, and which better educated persons will not attempt to do, as they do not like the trouble thus entailed, for a child thus treated is, I have no doubt, a more troublesome one than another who is afraid to ask for what it wants, and feels obliged to be contented with what is given to it, who dare not reason on any point with its elders. I am sure all this mnst make the reasoning faculties very torpid, and this being next to instinct is the faculty which children should be trained to use. I dare say people might say "How that child is spoiled,” etc., but I do not mind this. I like them to be independent. and this can only be done by much trouble, combined with good manners. I think crammmg children with information of a certain kind deadens its faculties, but as all things turn up at various times they will by ten or twelve know all common things. History, grammar etc. are only fit for a maturer age. I am sure I knew but little of either till very lately in spite of all the lessons and repetitions.


27th November, 1841. Mrs. M. A. Chaplin writes to her brother Acton:--

I have a new system of teaching children to write, which is to make them write with ease like grown up persons, instead of labouring up and down as in large text, which is quite out of their power, unless the whole body is moved with every stroke, which destroys freedom. I teach in this way, making the motion of the fingers and position of the hand the important point, and beginning thus: “mmm," instead-of the straight strokes. Hitherto I have succeeded very well.



29th June, 1892. Mrs. M. A. Chaplin writes to her brother Acton :-

The children are very well. I think you and I should differ about the degree of restraint to be imposed upon children, my notion being that they should themselves impose certain restraints in order to conform to the feelings of others and the general customs of society. I think unless the child is convinced of the necessity of this it will, when the parent or schoolmaster is removed, launch out, fancying it has found pleasure in doing as it pleases without regard to the feelings of others, having in itself no standard to weigh its actions by. When a child does anything wrong I think the fault should be brought before it in all its bearings. I mean, the inducements to commit it, results likely to ensue, etc. When this is done the child will be always sorrowful and anxious not to commit the same fault again, making its interest and the parents' the same; but, when a harsher course is pursued, the child often feels perverse and angry, setting up directly an opposing interest: it certainly will not commit the same fault again from fear of punishment, but its disposition is injured.


The following letter was written in the summer of 1846 by Mrs. M. A. Chaplin to her husband:--

Dieppe, Wednesday evening.

My dearest John,
Frederick will take this letter. I must, in your own systematic style, relate the particulars of our departure from Honfleur, transit and arrival here, but the whole was so novel in its arrangements that the most elaborate details will not suffice to put the tout ensemble before your mind's eye.

I found our landlord very civil and by no means extortionate. Tuesday I paid 5 francs for taking the luggage, Francine, Allan, and Ayrton. I went on the donkey with the baby, and the rest walked. We met Mrs. Skinner's party on the quai and all went in second places as it was very stormy, Frederick having warned us that in bad weather the best place was just between the paddle-boxes: here then we all sat and were all, but Johnny (J E H Skinner) and Holroyd, and Louy, more or less sick; Mrs. Skinner fainted and was obliged to be carried out of the boat.

When the children discovered Frederick they were delighted. The omnibus which was to convey the two families here in two days for 210 francs, declined taking all the luggage. It was about one o'clock when the children were put into the omnibus, but the squabbling about luggage took up an hour. Then Frederick took it off to be weighed and finally the surplus was left lo be sent on by diligence. Then it was arranged for Frederick to come on with us. He had to get his luggage, pay his bill, get his passport. This took another hour.

Finally, about three, we started; after going a little way we remembered the luggage to follow us had no address; stop for this. Then Frederick wanted something; stop for this. At last we were fairly off in our omnibus with four horses for Yvetot, Frederick standing on the step smoking a long pipe.

[Here follows a rough sketch of the omnibus showing Frederick smoking, headed "A Faint Idea."]

This is not half ridiculous enough. We stopped at Bolbee, but I have not said a word of the provisions laid in, in baskets. Directly we started there was a call for dinner, when a huge basket was lugged upon a box. The children looked ravenous. I unwrapped a cold shoulder of mutton and proceeded to lay slices of it on bread; after this they ate bread and stewed pears, and some splendid pears, which Fred had bought.

When we had eaten our dinner, we looked about as well as the rain would allow us, till we reached Bolbee [can’t be right], where we had some coffee, and the children milk and water, the charge for which was six francs, including cider for the servants. On returning to our 'bus it was dark, so with carpet, bags, etc., beds were made for all the children; by eight o'clock they were all fast asleep in all kinds of attitudes, presenting a mass of naked feet and legs.

We reached Yvetot at half-past 10. As they had only eight spare beds, some time was consumed in arranging beds on the floor for some of the children. We breakfasted there, and our bill altogether was 38 francs, including servants. In the breakfast room there was a party of brums, [i.e., from Birmingham.] I knew them by their accent. Mrs Skinner, at a distance, did not know they were speaking English. They kept their hats on, and were very vulgar; they had some railway contract, we guessed, from their conversation. Their bustling importance and abrupt manners led me to suppose that they must be brums, when at last we discovered it by what passed.

When we had breakfasted we proceeded to Totes, the weather fine, children all alive and merry, much delighted at being taken out thro’ the windows by Frederick when we came to a hill and occasionally standing by the side of him on the step at Totes. At Totes some of the party dined, all had soup, for this we paid 8f.

We reached this place at five o'clock. The moment we stopped a crowd collected around our vehicle, the first of the kind ever seen here. Fred got out to look for beds at various places, to ask prices, etc. One person agreed to take us, but on surveying the party, declined receiving so many children, said she would not have objected to a sehool, but did not like such young ones; so at last we turned into the Hotel de Londres. By the time Fred returned to the 'bus there were a hundred people round it, Ayrton hollowing out in French, "What do you want?" "Go away!" etc, and Allan saying "Sacra Mater," being the gardener's mode of swearing. We could not resist a fit of laughing when we had all alighted and the woman would not receive us; the waiter of this hotel bearing us off in triumph. Frederick says the whole journey is so novel; crossing the desert is nothing to it. Many persons, by the way, who had never seen a 'bus were lost in amazement, and some tried in vain to count the children; while others were amused at the bonnets and hats suspended all round the interior.

When conversation flagged the two babies had a duel and Fred amused them by throwing cakes to them as they sat all together at the further end, when there was a scramble, attempts at boxing between Ayrton and Holroyd - Johnny fell off the step, but was not hurt. Ask Fred when you see him how he liked the “Graville omnibus excursion”.

I am very glad we are away from Honfleur, as one is so dependent on the tide there, so that however much one might desire to reach England one cannot start till the day after receiving a letter unless the tide is late, then perhaps detained a night in Havre; all this is a serious drawback. Steamers go from here every other day.

[See MAC_letters.doc for an additional paragraph included here]

I have just got a lodging at 50 francs a week facing the sea, and good. I like this place very much. If for a month the rooms will be 150 francs.

[Letter from Matilda Adriana Chaplin to her brother Acton, addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Bombay, East Indies and postmarked Birmingham July 7, 1848. It is annotated ‘1848 – Description of children’]


Edgbaston, June 6,1848

My dear Acton

It is a great pleasure for me to hear from you, be the letter long or short, but the last being long the pleasure was increased in proportion. I begin to answer the end first. We are as yet unsettled. This house is much too small for our family and perhaps for our position here. Edward thinks it quite disadvantageous to John to live in so mean looking a house but his clients generally do not live hereabouts (being rather in the (?) district). However here we must remain until we can get a house to suit us. It is particularly important on John's account to find one that is sufficiently well built to be proof against the sudden changes of weather, and also to have rooms with warm aspect. We do not desire anything like grounds about it, as they are expensive if kept in order, but merely a garden and drive in front. Besides ground rent is high here.

This is the only good side of Birmingham on account of educational resources. Most of the houses are small or have much ground. Not being able to find a really good governess or to continue the German Master when away I sent the children to school in the day. This has turned out very well, the lady having some very enlarged ideas of education.

Agnes studies "Blair’s essays" some papers of Addison's Spectator -- the Illiad and Moliére. You will see from this that Miss Finch has left the beaten track in the hope of cultivating the girls’ minds -- and as she says trying to give them some idea of the pleasure to be derived from a good course of reading. She teaches them to draw from nature. Agnes must send you one of her sketches. They are only there four hours daily, most things being prepared at home. Astronomy is also learnt from the heavens, that is at present they are merely learning the names of constellations. Miss Finch is a clever unaffected lady-like person with much general information. Agnes is just at an age to profit much by the system, and it is also calculated to repress her only fault, which is rather seeking approbation for all she says and does. She is a handsome looking girl.

Julia is delicate looking with a pleasant affectionate countenance, but not handsome. She is generally liked for her sweeteness of manner. Louisa is more rough than either, with large expressive eyes and is always either romping or reading intently, generally history -- or biography connected with history. Holroyd is at school at Hammersmith – he will go to public school later. He was disgusted with a school at Brighton

Now of the boys. The eldest is at school at Hammersmith, there are 110 boys, from 7 to 14. The Master, late a fellow of new College Oxford is a polished gentleman. The boys are supposed on leaving to go to public schools, which is Holroyd's final destination nothing hindering -- he likes the school and seems to enjoy himself. He was much disgusted with a school at Brighton kept by a lady to which we sent him for his health, but it did not suit him. I believe the boys were kept too tame. He is now eight years old, has much observation and power of reasoning but has not as much quickness as might be desired. He is generally intimate with older boys than himself tho’ backward in some respects in learning. But one thing pleases me -- he never reads without thinking and quickly discovers any inconsistency in facts stated or peculiarity of style. His manners are good, neither pert nor shy -- and his countenance is genteel.

His next brother is quite unlike him, delighting in all forms of society he is rather handsome -- if you ever see a picture of Bunyan, the writer of Pilgrim’s Progress, it will give you an idea of his features and countenance - when he had long hair which curled a little he looked something like Milton's portraits. He is altogether more graceful in manner and appearance than most children of his age (not six till October). The next, Allan, is a bustling very sharp child just four years old, the youngest girl is two years old -- she is said to be more like me than any of the others.

I have now given you are little sketch of the family. Of John I have not said a word -- sometimes I feel very anxious about his health. There is I fear a decided tendency to dropsy tho’ great care may avert its more serious consequences for a time. Do not allude to it in your letters as I think it bad for him to dwell upon it. If it be possible for a man to rid himself of a tendency to this evil I think he may be so fortunate, for he is very careful and his general health is very good, but I often think this place for one reason or other does not exactly suit his constitutional tendency. During an illness I had some years ago I had a goitre which you know it is a species of dropsy, it was completely (?) after an absence of four months.

We cannot conceive how Henry Holroyd could be drawn in a second time having previously lost money by speculating with his brother John, his girls are now growing up and he will want the money. Mr Spurrier is fast decaying. Six months ago we thought him likely to live seven or eight years -- he walked or rode to the office all weathers, a distance of two and a half miles -- now he is sinking rapidly, his senses are still as keen as ever.

We are going to North Wales when the childrens’ holidays begin. There is a little watering place called Rhyl where the little ones will be all the time, but we propose making a little tour to Bangor etc. with the older children.

I shall send this to Bombay where you will be probably on its arrival. You never told me the price of a Desk you bought at my request -- it was for Mr Spurrier’s daughter but she and her husband are so (?) mean that we never gave it at kept it for some more worthy person. Mr Wakeham is married again to a very nice girl. He could not endure his solitude in his fine house at Winchester any longer.

Goodbye, with our very best love believe me ever your affectionate sister,

M. A. Chaplin

I hope you will soon come home, don't stay too long in India.
[Letter from Matilda addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Solicitor, Bombay, E Indies marked ‘per mail via Marseilles’ and postmarked London 4 Jan 1840]

Edgbaston, December 1839

My dear Acton

I received your letter before the shawl etc which however had arrived in (?) Street and was forwarded by Edward last week. I wish you could have seen the un-packing. Julia and her Sister Louisa seated by the side of the box and the latter assisting with her toy knife to force up the lid, both looking most eager. Louy opened it at last for Edward had nailed it up tightly. First came the shawl for which accept my best thank. "Oh me" said Louy which was echoed by the little ones, then they were delighted to pull out the straw etc. and make as much litter as possible, the enormous jars astonished them more than the contents. Edward sent me a jar of preserve (as the Dardises do not eat them) & do of (?) pickle, the children lasted the former so when the pickle was opened Louisa thrust in her hand and then put it in her mouth. She ran about the nursery making all sorts of wry faces and trying to get rid of the taste and saying "I don't like it".

The shawl I shall put away for the present, as velvet shawls and velvet short cloaks are all the rage. It would be a pity to wear so handsome an Indian shawl just now but the moths will certainly suffer as I shall fancy each one I see is going to make his next meal off "the shawl". It is delightfully warm. I made John try it on to appreciate this. This place is much colder than London.

You appear to consider India [as] healthy as England, which I am very glad of, perhaps having a feeling against the climate may be one reason why it disagrees with some people. I judged from what I heard people say generally who have been there. Mr Henry Holroyd's wife was obliged to come home from Calcutta with the other day for a change and to bring her children who were suffering from the climate, but are now quite well and the former returned. Things of this sort certainly make one fancy it does not suit English constitutions. John was quite indignant at your attack upon the Law, however I hope your success in India will enable you to return to England at no very distant period.

I am glad to find by your letter dated 7th October that you are not likely to become an "Indian". Do you understand me? I am now in possession of the Inkstand which you gave my grandmother. It was rather singular that we had gone on for more than three years without a decent writing turn out but our house is more comfortable than when you were here - as the family increases furniture etc. is increased. This alone makes a house appear more (?). I suppose Agnes will arrive in February. We are expecting another baby (boy I hope it may be) in March. Julia talks about her cousin in India [Frederick’s daughter Agnes perhaps?] and sometimes picks out certain toys for her to play with. We expect Edward here at Xmas. I hope the time may come when we shall not be the only members of the family to meet at this season. I had hoped he would have been accompanied by his little charge [Agnes?] but of course she cannot arrive so soon tho’ I see by the papers (which you see perhaps more regularly than I do) that they have begun to tow large vessels to India by steam and expect to make a difference of 25 days.

Mottram met Graham and Morris at a client’s here the other day, a tray maker I believe. Hearings speak of Bombay etc. and the one just returned he asked if they knew you and so discovered who they were. They said they should call him but I have not seen them. Mrs Basden and the Sharpins are living near Coventry. They spent a day here. Mrs S. is still very peculiar, it is a pity she talks slang so much and dresses herself out with such a profusion of dirty jewellery, because at heart she is a very kind amiable person and with more refinement of feeling than could possibly be expected from such an exterior. Mrs Basden is looking just the same as eight or ten years ago. They said they thought the McCanns had gone to America. Mrs McC went out for a year to Ireland as a governess I suppose. Her roguish husband drove her to this. Mrs Wickham is expecting a beginning of a family in the Spring. I have not heard from her since she received the scarfe which Edward says he sent her from you. They are flourishing. Mr Wickham works hard but thinks it better to make money while he can and then be independent.

I expect by the time you return this will be a very large and important town. Railroads do so much for it, and the grammar school (450 boys) with such masters as they have must improve the rising generation. Some handsome shops are building, and the town spreads in every direction. Sarah has no family, I never saw anyone looking so young as she does, exactly the same or perhaps better than when you left, but Lucy is still a treasure. Her love has entered the new police here. By the buy, William Beckley has been removed to the Euston Square Station and is very important I suppose. This is the best appointment he could have. I can fancy John driving about, he never writes to me. Remind him that we are (?) and shall be happy to (?) of him.

I am going to write to Frederick. I have told you all and perhaps more than it will interest you to read. John as usual goes daily "to the office." Luncheon in his pocket, sometimes papers in his hand, and Spurrier is just the same as (?) is living at the Isle of (?) having entirely given up business. John (?) his love to you and John the same from myself, believe me ever your affectionate sister M. A. Chaplin

December 11th 1839

January 2nd. This letter has become rather stale but when I had finished it I found (?) before the fourth of January so I have the opportunity of wishing you a merry Xmas. We passed it pleasurable enough. Edward left us yesterday -- there is nothing new but the prospect of the inevitable (?) frost on the tenth of this month.


[Letter from Matilda addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Solicitor, Bombay, E Indies marked ‘via Falmouth’ and postmarked Birmingham July 17, 1840]

Edgbaston, July 15th 1840.

My dear Acton

An addition to the family has occurred since I wrote last, making the third. The new one is a fine little boy more like our family than either of the others. He is now four months old and not christened. His godfathers are to be Edward Chaplin, Mr Holroyd the Commissioner of Bankrupts - neither of whom can come for two or three weeks, and we cannot have him christened quite by proxy. Agnes is here and the three are very happy together. Agnes of course taking the lead. Little Edward Chaplin left us a week ago. I believe poor Agnes was required to be with him, he bullied them so severely - the others are rather too young to be bullied but he was always pushing them about and snatching away their favourite toys. He is present a most unpropressing(?) bird(?), clever, but his (?) remain very wild for tho’ he goes to school at a Miss Kells this is not the sort of cultivation which such a boy requires. He thought the being here was something between school and home, and he considers me dreadfully strict.

Sarah Motteram has just returned from her annual visit to London this year. The (?) obliges me to remain at home. Our first nurse is still with us and takes due care of their bodies while I attend to their minds (not by teaching them a, b, c etc.), assisted by a young person of respectability who comes in the afternoon, as I am most anxious to keep them as much as possible away from servants. I would never have two nurses, as I think the conversations which generally take place between them are very unfit for childrens’ ears. Agnes talks much of you, and soon discovered that John's profession was something like yours - going to the office etc. – and directly made her compare.

I saw your name in The Times some time ago, in a breach of promise of marriage case. We do not form many intimates here, though in time we may, as I think the newly married couples appear to be far more agreeable than those of the old school to whom I was introduced first of course. Where people make their money in a commercial way the generation farthest removed from the founder of any branch of trade (or rather any particular (?)) is the most agreeable, but nearly all of them have bad manners, shy and formal, with very little information on any point - particularly the females.

I am rather busy superintending jams & just now. At a future time I think I shall superintend the education of the children and procure some person in the station of a lady to superintend all the domestic arrangements and the children when company or illness may take me away. I suppose you may have heard from Edward of the death of Mrs Sharpen -- poor Mrs Basden will be left quite alone. The McCann's I believe are in America. When Sarah M. was in Town she saw Mrs (?) at the Horticultural Gardens with all the old set around her, also Mr Whiting and his step daughter. Charles Cochrane’s wife is almost a mad woman. Sarah said she was quite glad to get out of her presence. Motteram and his partner have disposed by mutual consent which John regrets tho’ I believe Motteram will have a larger income – it is not considered very honourable affairs. Mr Chaplin Sen’r is in capital health. The barristers at Gray’s Inn have presented him with a handsome silver coffee tray.

I think I have told you all news and probably some you will have heard before. With many thanks for your kindness which I cannot adequately repay - believe me my dear Acton

Ever your affectionate sister
M. A. C. Chaplin





[Letter to Acton S Ayrton Esq, Bombay, East Indies, marked ‘via Falmouth’, postmarked 1840]

November 29th 1840

My dear Acton

I almost fear I am too late for this month's mail and even if in time I suppose since the disturbances in Egypt have arisen it is rather uncertain when, if ever, this will reach you.

I have to thank you for a letter received this month and hope you continue well in spite of your confinement to the house and (?) during the rains. I learnt much more of your Indian habits from Agnes than I could from many letters. We are looking forward to seeing her with Edward during Xmas. We asked Dudley and his wife to join our fireside circle then but it appears it is a busy time with Hague and Co. I am going to ask his wife to come with Edward. I hear she is a very agreeable person, amiable etc., so I am desirous of showing her any attention.

Edward did not know the Sherbert was for me, he gave the bottle to the Dardises which was well -- the rest I have but not having yet tasted it I cannot discuss its merits. When Edward comes he will open a bottle and let you know the result. This reminds me of your former present, i.e. the shawl -- we have some piercing weather lately, but this so protected me that I only knew of it from my friends.

If I spoke to you of buying this house it was not with a view of settling in it for ever for if our means should ever admit of it we intend (?) much farther in the country. It was with a view of having it at a much lower rent - house(?) is as high here as in or near to London.We paid £75 a year for this and spent a great deal in repairing painting etc. Some of the large houses just about here let for upwards of £200 a year unfurnished and with very little land.

In your last letter you advert to my scheme to have a lady for a housekeeper. My object is to have a person with whom I could leave the children in case of my absence of or illness or otherwise. If I educate them myself they would if not so provided run wild and be with the servants, in fact I must either send them to school or have a substitute always at hand here. A person of inferior station would not do. I should treat her as a governess but there would be no degradation in doing those matters of housekeeping which I now do for myself.

I believe Mrs Harrison who lived at the Hutchinsons was the widow of a clergyman. Have you heard that Ann Chaplin is about to be married to a very agreeable young clergyman? I have as yet known him only by report. His father is much pleased with the affair, the other members of his family are all well.

I hope John is better. Tell him to write to me. I wrote by the last mail to him, my former letters are unanswered. I find Frederick is highly amused with my reports on nursery education. The children are well - since they have seen Agnes they often talk of you. Julia listens with evident astonishment to her Indian narratives. What has become of poor Captain Brown? John was in London last Sunday week and saw his name placarded about in the Sunday newspaper shops. We are quite anxious to hear the result.

The people here are not very agreeable. Now and then we meet pleasant people who generally come from some other place, and since the railroad is opened we see many friends en route to various places. We had a delightful excursion at the time of the festival here - in Derbyshire and Notts, visiting the noblemens’ and gentlemens’ seats which are very thick just there. We concluded out trip by staying ten days at Matlock, which is a very pretty place tho’ dull enough to pass the honeymoon in.

My love to John when you see him. We are looking forward to enjoy Xmas. I shall be glad when you can return to join us. Believe me my dear Acton, ever your affectionate sister

M. A. Chaplin

Our boy is quite a young Hercules. Will not be nursed but delights in moving with great rapidity and on reaching a chair immediately pulls himself up and will stand for five or six minutes. I have seen him balance on one foot to reach any thing. He is just eight months.

Ann Chaplin and her intended breakfasted one morning with Edward. She was quite delighted with his rooms, which she says are quite fit for a wife.



[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies marked ‘via Falmouth’]

November 27th 1841. Hagley Cottage, Edgbaston

My dear Acton

(?) I have allowed to all three months to pass without writing to you but the reason of this is that I defer the writing till quite the end of the month and then for get it till it is too late or something of a domestic nature of close to fill up all my time and after all this pretty you'd I have but little to say that may interest you. But the ties of relationship are so strong that it gives me pleasure to tell you any thing in respect of my children or husband. I often long for the time to arrive when you will see us but how many changes may take place ‘ere then. I fancy sometimes you would like to see me and the children.

Three in a number (and no prospect of an addition at present to that number). First to the oldest little girls are very fond of each other and patronise the baby who is (?) years younger than Louisa. He is a fine strong boy in all respects five or six months older than he is (?) 20 months he makes himself a ladder or stools and chairs to reach any thing and communities himself with turning down the large chair at; loading it and then drawing it about for a wheel-barrow. This will give you some idea of his strength when our young baby. I would not allow anyone to hold him on his legs or as they call it "set him on his feet" but left the matter to nature, his energy being enough to start him, and before the year he walked very well.

Julia is five years old at Xmas. Edward and I have a new system of teaching children to write which is to make them write with ease like grown persons instead of labouring up and down as in large (?) which is quite (?) of their power unless the whole body is moved with every stroke which destroys freedom. I teach Julia in this way making for motion of the fingers and position of the hand the important point and beginning thus: [squiggle follows] instead of the straight strokes hitherto. I have succeeded very well.

I have been expecting to hear of the arrival of Frederick and Edward in London as I (?) a letter from Edward (?) September 29 in which he said they should go around by Constantinople and then return home shortly -- since this I have heard nothing of them. Frederick is bringing us of fine (?) from Egypt. Where is John. I never hear from him which I much regret as such long continued silence must (?) eventually. If you see him ask him when he will answer my letters.

We have a hard frost which is rather unusual in this month, Your shawl therefore is on active service. John still goes to (?) and has very good health so indeed has his ‘partner’ much to the regret of his family, what a pity for a man to live in a way that renders this event. (?). They say he is worth about £200,000 and John reckons that this is probably correct. They live just as when you were here. He had a little (?) with John a short time ago because he would not consent to (?) in writing (?) feeling himself rather weaker wanted some (?) of this sort to make a (?) of fearing John have would become too popular with the clients.

I suppose business is flourishing with you. Mr Smith your school fellow who was with Blore seems to be (?). He is the architect of a proprietary school now erecting here -- this the (?) he has got picture was (?) up before competition.

I must say adieu now. I am your [ends]

[then further lines crossing over previous text at right angles]

This evening to see and hear something of animal magnetism -- it certainly (?) good thing though most people laugh at it. I think it will eventually be turned to admirable use in many ways but chiefly that surgically operations may be performed without feeling pain while the person is under its influence.

Love to John when you see him. I heard from (?) quite well and happy.

Your affectionate sister

M. Chaplin


[Letter addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Bombay, E Indies (via Falmouth)]

May 2nd, 1842

My dear Acton

Edward and Frederick have not yet made their appearance which I regret as I am in London for a few weeks with my young brood, though consisting only of three. We have lodgings spacious and airy in as terrace which you may remember, just behind Trinity Church, Regents Park, or rather new Rd -- our leaving home was rather of necessity as our cottage required painting and repairing. John likes it to look always fresh and in good order.

I amuse the children with a little sightseeing -- too much of it confuses them, but as they take a lively interest in all such things I gratify them as much as I can. They do not care for any food with an object in view of this sort - in the Coliseum today they had a bun for the Ducks and birds but did not appear to think of eating any of the cakes etc. which are sold there, in fact it is observed by everyone how little they care for "nice things," which is agreeable to me as I think it a great point when the child's mind or faculties triumphs over its sensual gratifications. One said the other day she would rather walk if she were tired because she did not to see so much when she rode. The second is considered a beauty, there are fine points in her face and a splendid juvenile brunette complexion tho’ not very dark.

Agnes is with us for a few days. I shall be glad when Edward comes home as no one here has authority to speak to (?) about little things, which should be attended to. When I went to fetch her I thought she looked untidy and neglected, though this does not go far beyond her dress yet. She seems left too much to the servants and herself when not at (?). Mrs (?) pretends not know anything about her clothes, saying "the misse does this or that etc.," when I mentioned any thing of this sort. Mrs Cater(?) is a nice person I daresay of decent family originally French, but came over in some revolution(?) and settled as Farmers here.

I went to a soirée at the Dardises, all just as when you were here, but some married, though many of these male and female were there. Frederick has sent home his luggage. I hope therefore soon to see him. Edward Chaplin Junior(?) is here playing with the children. He is a pleasing boy - at present he has a tutor all day with him at home but goes to school after Midr [mid-summer?]. Robert Hicks is practising in Old Burlington Street.

This is merely to let you know I am alive and well

Your affectionate Sister
M A Chaplin


[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies marked ‘via Falmouth’ and annotated ‘Mrs Field’s wedding, Julia’s tonsils. Year not legible or not shown in postmark, but from the reference to Acton’s forthcoming birth it must be 1842.]

Albany Street, London. July 29th [1842]

My dear Acton

Thank you for your attention to our commissions, I think I said “a desk like that you gave Edward” but you say in your letter the box, and in one of your letters the work box, -- until it comes we cannot tell where the mistake is.

We are in London upon the occasion of Ann Chaplin's wedding which took place three days ago. It was a very gay affair are, there being a family party of 40 (with very few exceptions). And Ann being popular at Camden Town and Mr Field who was once curate there also a favourite there was a tremendous crowd all in holiday attire outside the gates and even at St. Martin's Church (this Church was this morning considerably injured by lightning).

Ann’s husband is a gentlemanly man and clever, but like many young clergymen rather narrow-minded. He is economical, having already saved some hundreds out of of a small salary(?). This is fortunate, as Ann required a husband to take care of the financial department. They have taken a house in Brompton Square, just now they are at the lakes. Mr Chaplin will be so much alone that I think he must look out for another wife -- he is a much younger looking man than most of his age -- 72 or 73.

I have Julia in Town with me having brought her to have an enlargement of the tonsils cut off, the operation was performed today. It is an excellent thing, the disease caused her voice to be thick and her mouth to be always half open, and the cutting is but little pain, indeed scarcely (?) an hour after she could eat her bread and butter as usual though she had a piece taken off as large as the top of your first finger.

Mr and Mrs Wickham have a handsome carriage having no family and a large income they can have every luxury. They have a first rate housekeeper for the School, Mrs W. having her own waiting maid and living quite apart from the school, the domestic details of which are managed by Mr W. and Housekeeper. I met yesterday a Mr Turner, at Camden town, an eminent? conveyancer, who was a Buckinghamshire man and knew my grandfather and all the Aylesbury party.

John left me this evening to go to Duck pool assizes. Julia and I return home next week -- the two at home are quite well -- a fourth is expected to join the family party in October. You would have been amused to have heard Julia reason with the surgeon -- when he tried to humbug her about the instrument not being sharp -- if it were not so she it would not do for this purpose. When they said it would not hurt afterwards as it was not exposed to the air she said yes it is, every time I open my mouth. The doctors were much amused however she told them she wished to have it down and thought the instrument a very nice one, only she could not make up her mind to it. She is a peculiar child -- she will never eat anything unusual unless told it is quite wholesome. Writing and reading will amuse her alone for a long time.

Now I have begun about the children. I don't know where it will end -- Neither Edward nor Fred have arrived yet. Edward is in Switzerland on (?) and Fred I don't exactly know where. I am going to morrow to see Agnes. I am glad when Georgina is so fortunate in her marriage, give my love when you see her also to John when you see him or write.

From your affectionate sister
M. A. C. Chaplin



[Letter addressed to A S Ayrton Esqr, Bombay, E Indies (via Falmouth), postmarked Birmingham March 30th, 1843]

Edgbaston, March 30th

My dear Acton

Thank you for executing the commission about the Desk. We were amused at Tom Holroyd's coolly asking you to expend so much money for him - for should he not have arrived at Bombay it would have been troublesome to you. I am glad you think he may succeed in making money again. He knows very well how to spend it when he has it, and also manages very well with very limited means. I suppose just now he is quite dependent on his brothers -- a serious thing for them as they have rather large families.

John was sorry he could not get the commission about the Charter etc. (?) for you -- not being in London himself he wrote to others but could not do anything to his own satisfaction. However, Frederick has now I believe done what you required. John intended writing to you by this mail about your enquiries respecting a Clerk. He thinks that are many men who would like to go out if they had the money to start with -- then what would be the salary (and other particulars)? -- people in an inferior station think it almost next to being transported to Botany Bay. John would not be unlikely to hear of some one. He is now confined to his bed with a bad sore throat having before suffered severely from one of the same kind. I was rather alarmed but he is now improving.

We have all a kind of influenza but trust that we shall be quite well before this reaches Alexandria. The Field you mentioned behind our house is let for ever to the tenants of the Inn close by. We are fortunate not to have it built upon as this parish is five times as popular as when first we came here. Agnes is with us at present. I am sorry to find during the time she has been with Mrs Penn she has not lost any of her old faults. I think Mrs P. considered if she taught her certain lessons that she fulfilled her duty. This is but a small part as you well know of a child's education.

Mrs Feild late/Ann Chaplin expects to be confined shortly. This is a remarkable events in the Chaplin family. The others are very well. The notable Tom Spurrier is in (?) and his Father is still living in the hope that he will take kindly to the Law.

Adieu -- with John's love, believe me your affectionate on Sister

M. A. C.
The China jars you mentioned would be de trop in this cottage and besides rather too expensive.


[Letter to A S Ayrton Esqre, Bombay, E Indies stamped Five Ways and postmarked Birmingham January 29th 1844]

Hagley Cottage, January 29th

My dear Acton

I did not write by the last mail to thank you for the shawl because I heard that it had arrived and expected by this time to have seen it, but it is still passing the custom house. I will no longer delay thanking you for it.

I do not think I have written to you since our trip to Paris. It is a horrid place for Ladies to walk in. The omnibuses comes splashing past thro’ the ever flowing and litter and unless one can retreat into a shop your dress must suffer, but Parisian Ladies only walk in the Tuilleries I think, which place appears to be a sort of public nursery. There are many alterations in that city since you passed thro’ -- on our return we stayed ten days at Boulogne - saw the Grahams here. Mr G. is an eccentric gentleman, his son a young pickle is gone to Eton - all this you probably know.

We have quite a large family, five with Agnes. I was obliged to send off my french governess after three months (?) she was such a democrat and so sulkey. I have now an Irish lass by birth but she has been educated in Paris and speaks French very well with a French accent, so that the children make a tolerable progress in this. The little boy, 4 in March, understands all the commonplace talk in French, and can speak a little. It is surprising how soon children pick up a language. I shall have a German in the house when they are fluent in French. English governesses generally teach so little that I think it will be always better to have a foreigner, then it is quite certain that they are learning one language well - besides the conversation often turning on her native country enlarges their minds, and there is not that gossiping which is often the fault of governesses. Since the penny post system I hear that the young governesses are always writing letters of two or three sheets to their bosom friends, instead of attending to their pupils.

Mr and Mrs Skinner have five children. They live at Brighton. We have college of surgeons here and they want to get an act for empowering its heads to grant degrees. The sagacity of this arrangement is the great question here just now. Agnes will write you a few lines I daresay. Julia intended to have done so but is very poorly. Edward has returned to London - at last his next movements are quite unknown. Where he a member of the royal family it would puzzle newspaper editors to give the public a regular outline of his movements.

Believe me, my dear Acton
Your affectionate sister
M A Chaplin



[Badly crumpled letter to Acton in India, right edge missing in places]

Hagley Cottage, Edgbaston

June 19th

My dear Acton

I expected a letter from you by the last mail. I suppose Dudley has not heard as he generally lets me know when he has, however I have your paper addressed to Edward, as he has not yet returned home. I heard from Fred about two weeks ago from Constantinople where he was going then to leave (?) a few days for the mouth of the Danube and (?) that week he intended to reach Paris. Edward you may have heard was at Venice when we last received letters from him. We are now daily expecting his arrival unless he may think it agreeable to remain on the continent till after the long vacation when I suppose he will resume his legal life though I fancy he has scarcely begun it yet.

The children are very well. I think you and I should (?) about the degree of restraint to be imposed upon children, my notion being that they should themselves impose certain restraints in order to conform to the feelings of others and the general custom of society. I think unless the child is convinced of the necessity of this it will when the parent or schoolmaster is removed launch out fancying it has found pleasure in doing as it pleases without regard to the feelings of others, having in itself no standard to way its actions by.

When the child does anything wrong I think the fault should be brought before it -- in all its bearings. I mean the inducements to (?) results likely to ensure etc. When this is done the child will be always sorrowful and anxious not to commit the same fault again, making its interests and the parents’ the same, but when a harsher course is pursued the child often feels perverse and angry, setting up directly an opposing interest. It certainly will not commit the same fault again from fear of punishment, but it's disp(?) is injured.

I hope you are pretty well -- how is John now? Is he likely to (?) in the wars? Let us know as soon as you can about the desk which how(?) I think I asked you to send we will pay Edward for it as I believe(?) keep an account with him. I heard from Agnes a day or two ago, she seems well and happy -- adieu -- believe me your affectionate sister

M. A. Chaplin


[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies, postmarked Birmingham, August 30, 1845]

August 26, 1845. Edgbaston

My dear Acton

It is a long time since I wrote to you but you pass your time so profitably that my omission may pass unheeded. However now Frederick is in England I hear of you constantly, and a letter is only useful to keep alive family affection - though I believe on the part of John if this depends on correspondence it must have expired long ago, but I must make a last effort to rekindle it. I suppose Frederick also gave you a general idea of our movements - mine have been rather varied lately on account chiefly of Julia's health. The whooping cough proved a very dangerous affair with her and this house is not in a very healthy situation, therefore when once ill no one could well recover in it.

We are now trying to let it but perhaps as others have the same opinion of this domain as we so we shall not easily let it. We passed last winter at Boulogne and I think I shall send the children there next winter with the governess, who is a very good sort of young lady -- no nonsense or cant but with a proper integrity, always anxious to do the duty (as a business), in an unaffected cheerful manner. She is musical and takes great pains to teach Agnes Julia and Louey and I think I can trust with the children at Boulogne as John found it dull last winter alone here. Boulogne is a good place to reside in with the family. The masters are good. One from the college taught Agnes French and there is an excellent dancing academy -- three per week -- and the acquisition of French while children are young is very desirable. I could not succeed in bringing home a French misse. I think our great distance from London alarms them. By the bye, I must not close this chapter on domestic history without telling you that there are five (?) -- three male two female - the eldest boy is beginning to "come out" and shows some aptitude for figures and ‘causes’ are carefully traced by him. Where it not for this he might be thought stupid. He is to go to school when about seven. He has an accurate eye and writes well for his age -- five last March. The next, Ayrton, is very different -- quick and boisterous -- and much admired as a showey child with a large stock of impotence (?!!). "Me vont" being his favourite expression just now.

I take an interest in railroads, and have examined yours with the map. Someone thinks the rails may be deranged by a shock of earthquake. I hope this is not to happen at first or shares will be at a discount. I have been staying lately in Shropshire with some ladies who are clients of John's and some young ladies of the family amuse themselves with speculating in the (?) shares. While I was there they cleared (with a hint from John) £30 or £40 one day. A nice addition to a young lady’s pin money.

The other day when John went to London Edward was lost, however he is found at (?), a singularly out of the way corner to go into for change of air. I hope he is now going to take to the Law. He might, John says, soon make a good income if he would work.

Do you know any pleasant families at Boulogne? There is a large assemblage of Indians there now especially I fancy from your side. I did not seek any introductions to anyone there last winter as I was much occupied with the children, who all had the measles. I heard that Agnes had them in India. This must have been a mistake - or she had them twice.

Adieu, Agnes is going to write to you, and perhaps the others.

Your affectionate Sister
M. A. Chaplin


[Letter from Mde. Chaplin, chez Melle Maliot, Rue Descaliers 37, to her husband John, addressed as J. Chaplin Esq., Solicitor, Birmingham. Could be 1846.]

2nd letter. Dieppe, Wednesday evening]

My dearest John

Frederick will take this letter. I must in your own systematic style relate the particulars of our departure from Honfleur, transit and arrival here but the whole was so novel in its arrangements that the most elaborate details will not suffice to put the toute ensemble before your mind’s eye.

[For the full text of this see Chaplin, Matilda Adriana.doc (Matilda Adriana Ayrton’s Memoirs) until just before the last paragraph – the following text is in the orginal letter but not in the Memoirs]:

If we go to Folkestone I think I shall go on to Boulogne by Diligence -- we stop there. I do not think Malvern or Leamington or any of those inland places would do so well, it is certain that the best place at this time of the year is the seaside. I would always if I could (?) country for children at the fall of the leaf therefore I think it a pity to take them out of it when they can as conveniently be by the sea -- This place is cheap though just now, but if Folkestone is cheap, as Frederick seems to apprehend it is at this season, I would prefer being there, as it is unpleasant to cross in the middle of winter, and above all at Folkestone there would be a chance of seeing you, which would be impossible here - as I am sure Folkestone must be quite as good for the children as Brighton. I should like to know something of it as it is probably cheaper at any time of the year and only as far by railroad from Dover if houses are high at Folkestone. I think it would be just as well to stay here, which is certainly a much more acceptable place than Honfleur, and the children can get sea bathing and sea air.

I am sitting up to write this as tomorrow I must look for a lodging - you seem to think that a remove costs so much but suppose that in England you said one day "I will pay every penny I owe (?) all at home it would amount to a considerable sum and this is the case on leaving a place -- besides in this instance getting all our winter clothes -- by the bye we only had Pinners Phaeton once all have (?) so on being asked fairly -- and that was to go to Handsworth and (?) hill with you.

My reason for not writing sooner was that I did not resolve where to go when I heard that Brighton was so dear, for certainly I could not agree with you that it was best to go home when we might be by the sea.

I have just got the lodging Thursday morning at 50 francs the week facing the sea and good. I like this place very much if for a month the rooms will be 150 francs. I had a touch of (?) in the leg before I left Honfleur. It is well now, adieu dearest, your ever loving M.A.C. My lodging is at a girls school, a very large old house with good thick walls.



[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Solr, Bombay, E. Indies, via Falmouth, postmarked Birmingham, 1847, annotated ‘Death of Mrs Wickham’]

Edgbaston, February 20th

My dear Acton

You will perhaps already have learnt from some English newspaper the cause of this mourning paper -- the death of Mrs Wickham -- an event which I much lament for she possessed many excellent qualities and always (?) more affection for us than either of her sisters do. I believe you also preferred her.

Mr Wickham's position is very melancholy though he has the pleasant consolation of feeling that he was unwearied in his attentions to her -- and most liberal in his endeavours to save her life by seeking the best medical advice, and supplying her with whatever art could suggest to alleviate her sufferings, though there was not much acute pain; she died from disease of the heart and (?). Though to the last there was some reasonable hope of perfect recovery she was attacked sometimes by spasm of the heart and a protracted seizure finally carried her off.

At this period John was also very ill from dropsy which was induced by over excitement and late hours in business aided by cold. It appears to be of the kind that can be completely cured, for he is now engaged as usual though under promise of taking care of himself. The rest of the family are all quite well.

I suppose you hear of our moves from Edward occasionally. Frederick's letters are probably so official that we do not occupy any corner in them. We have left Hagley Cottage and are now living in a house rather nearer to the Town but it only just holds us, there is not a better to be found just now. We have this by the year, the good houses here have more grounds than we want -- the others are all about the size of ours. The domestic architecture here is at such a low ebb we sometimes think we must build.

Mr Hugh Smith has been consulted on this point. Poor Spurrier is turned out of his house to make room for the new railroad terminus, he told people to induce them to let him a house cheap, that he should be sure to remain in it, as he did not like moving (he is just 80!).

Do you read Dickens works -- how do like his last? Or present? We have german tutor for Agnes, Julia and Louy. He was master of one of the government schools in Bavaria but banished about ten years ago for some sentiment too freely expressed in the public paper. He was then Tutor in a school in England which was given up. He understands the English language well -- in addition to the elements of the sciences and is altogether superior to any governess I have met with -- he lodges near and comes daily. Holroyd goes to a proprietary school very near though he cannot remain there very long as they have a horrid provincial accident. To combat this would really be no joke.

I hope you give yourself leisure for recreation. By the bye, I like your coffee very much. We have a French nurse who also approves of the flavour and says it is "tout ce qu’il ya de mieux, frais & vert” for we roast it ourselves. The children send their love. Believe me -- your affectionate Sister
M. A. Chaplin

What do we owe you for the desk?



[Letter from Matilda to A.S.Ayrton, Bombay, E. Indies, postmarked Malta and Alexandria]

Malta, September 14th 1847

My dear Acton

The climate here makes me fancy I am more than halfway to India. I do not know exactly the difference of latitude between England, Malta and Bombay but perhaps this is halfway between the two in climate though not in distance. John was advised to (?) in the Mediterranean and to pass some time in Italy or some southern part of Europe - it is essential to combine amusement that he may be completely (?) and return to England quite fresh. He is already much benefitted. I suppose this warm air thins the blood or at all events effects such a change in the system as to suppress and we may hope to kill his disease which a very intelligent young medical man at Brighton supposed from his general good health to be the result of a severe attack of congestion in the kidneys, than any organic disease. I regret he cannot pass a winter here however, considering his illness to have resulted from general debility. I hope the suspension from business and the warm sea air may be of permanent benefit even after a short time for our whole period of absence from England will not have exceeded seven or eight weeks.

We crossed France and embarked at Marseilles in a Neapolitan steamer for Naples. The vessel was remarkably well constructed, table good and company both French and English. Agreeable amongst others a great singer, French by birth but of the Scala at Milan who gratified us by good-naturedly singing (?) anything he was requested to sing -- a woman who could speak English also made agreeable to John -- two English barristers we stopped a day at Genoa -- another at Leghorn whence there is now a race road to Pisa in half an hour I think. The Campo Santa there must be a delightful place for a resident to spend some hours in -- we were obliged to hurry through it. The leaning tower was like looking at any picture you may see of it -- but through a magnifying glass -- the interior of the Baptistry is unique -- grand with a beautiful echo of a musical tone.

Naples is hot just now but the excursions in the country about are pleasant -- there is a railroad to Pompeii -- they have just excavated a beautiful private house which the King intends to have preserved in its present state instead of removing everything removable as in former cases to the museum at Naples. The frescoes in the rooms are very pretty and appropriate, the colours still bright. The walls divided into panels with a pretty picture forming a medallion -- but the garden or court to our English taste is puerile -- ducks carved in marble are supposed to be moving about -- small (?) gods placed at intervals, one beautiful (?) piece of sculpture of a boy taking a thorn from the foot of a satire, a little fountain in the centre and a sort of grotto at the back made of bits of various coloured marble or earth and shells inlaid in a pattern. This latter ornament seems to have been common there. The Italians and Sicilians still seem to retain much of the style of building in Pompeii. The greatest difference is in the size of the (?)

We came from Naples in a Neapolitan steamer not so well conducted as the other and very full of persons of the rank of our farmers going home to their vintage and hill (?). (?) time we thought them all second class passengers filthy in their habits and coarse in voice and manner. The more agreeable passengers were a Maltese advocate and his family who had been passing the vacation at Naples -- he has (?) his attentions here and asked us to go with him to his country house in the interior of the island, near which are some antiquities supposed to be Carthaginian or Phoenician. Everything here is connected with the grand Knights. The palace of the "Masters" is now used as the government house. There is a fine armoury there.

I am much tormented by the mosquitoes who spare John. My hands are stiff with bites. We leave this on Friday 17th for Athens. We had some idea of going to Alexandria, the trip I should much like but then you should meet us there -- from Athens we return home by Patras and Trieste. I very much enjoy these voyages as there is no unpleasant smell in these steamer as in the English steamers and except from Sicily to Malta we were close to the coast all the time with a tolerably calm sea.

Adieu from your affectionate sister

M.A. Chaplin [and, on the same paper a note from John Clarke Chaplin]

My dear Acton

When I wrote to you I fully thought I was about to return to my office; but on reaching London, and seeing Dr Hodgkin, Frederick and Edward, they all agreed I ought to prolong my relaxation from business and now we are (Malta) we are going to Greece and then return home by Venice. I enjoyed my travels but shall more enjoy being at work again provided I also have no return of my complaint.

Adieu, with best love,
Yours affectionately
J. C. Chaplin




END


[To Ayrton Chaplin from his mother Matilda Adriana in a shaky but readable hand. Probably 1893]

[Envelope addressed to Post Office, Brisbane as below]

98 Palace Gardens Terrace
February 2nd

And no tidings dearest Ayrton of you! It is worse than going to India in the old days, when everyone sent a letter from the Cape on the way east. I did not write last week, but no doubt Edith did, and will have told you that I have returned from Plymouth. Everyone says I am looking so well, that I begin to think I'm blooming, in a kind of 2nd childhood, that must be it. Well I do feel much better for the fresh air of the breezy Hoe. John and Louie were both better than when I left home.

Hilary had a bilious attack, the excess of cream even showed itself by extreme drowsiness during the journey to town; this symptom alarmed me, for I feared the incipient stage of typhoid, or scarlet fever; however it all ended in vomiting to a good night. He had not eaten since breakfast -- the next day he went to school, rather eager about his next term's work. Edith, Audrey and Henry dined here last Saturday. Henry is very well mannered and pleasant, he did not stay long, as he was going to dances at Constance's. I must go one evening to see these new or rather revised dances. I really hope Dorney is learning steadily -- he repeated perfectly to me all the Latin pronouns and 4 conjugations. Phyllis, who got a severe chill when skating, is better now, but still delicate. Her father fell ill at Wimbledon, the gentleman kindly sent him to his house a mile off to get dry clothes, and took care of Phyllis. She, being tired, sat down and then took cold -- her mucous membrane was ulcerated throughout, and her face and hands very much swelled -- she is now recovering and has a good appetite, she has been staying here for the last week.

We are longing for news of you. Julia was lunching here today. She intended to call on Edith but came on and she had no waterproof. Allan's girls are over the measles, but Dorothy is delicate still. Hilary's master much wishes him to go up for a Winchester scholarship - £100 a year at school which if obtained on leaving, is continued at Oxford. He will try in March for Harrow. Winchester exams are in June.

I intended to go to Aubrey Road today but a black fog keeps me indoors. I send you a D. N. [Daily News] You will see that Chamberlain's speech on the Queen's speech is very poor.

Goodbye dearest Ayrton
From your loving mother
M. A C.




[Envelope date stamped Brisbane March 25th 93 on arrival, addressed]:

The Revd
Ayrton Chaplin
Post Office
Brisbane
Queensland
Australia

To be called for.

98 Palace Gardens Terrace
17 February

Dearest Ayrton

I am hungry and thirsty for news of you and looking daily for it - each time that Edith comes I expect she is going to announce the receipt of a telegram from Brisbane or Glasgow. I read with interest about the floods at Brisbane -- but by the time you get there the town may be dry though the effect of having been in some parts underwater would be still very apparent. I saw Edith yesterday and thought her looking well, also on the previous day, Audrey, also well.

Home rule is the topic but the G. O. M. has dropped that title. Of course the bill will be carried in some form. I fancy the Queen is a liberal from the impressions of her early years and would listen to Gladstone's powerful and respectful tongue -- he, I see by the paper, goes to Osborne quietly. Phyllis is staying with me - till Monday, when I expect Anna Chaplin and René, for a few days (from Bournemouth). Julia was here yesterday -- she is very well -- her eyes better, but not quite strong. I expect Louie and John next month, when Louie goes with Hilary to Harrow, to try for a scholarship; he can try again next year.

We are having a very fine month. Mrs Rollings who was here a few days ago, says the gardens are in a very promising state. She enquired after you and yours. I am going today to a juvenile 5 o'Ck at Constance's as I want to see how the new dances are done - and if the Gavotte is the same as it was in my young days.

Mr Park has left Boulogne and has the living of Chertsey, near London. They were anxious to get to London as their two sons are in London. Rene is at home this term. Holloway College is very pleasant but empty for its size. What a heap of letters you will find at Brisbane! Dear Ayrton, it requires faith to write them. Phyllis is looking well, she is growing fast and requires much care and food. My trouble with her here is her walking out, if I make arrangements at 29 they are not kept and it is so important.

With such a good correspondent as your dear wife, you hear all that you want to know -- take care of yourself for the sake of all who love you amongst them.

Your loving mother



Wednesday 28th [no year, no month given]

Dearest Ayrton,

I (we) shall be much pleased to see you on Tuesday, as you can sleep in Henry's room. Audrey will be in the room over drawing-room as Louie will be at Winchester. Allan has a room near as John will be here tonight and Louie tomorrow.

The baby much delights in Henry who amused himself for two hours with him yesterday afternoon as he kept appealing to him by holding on to his knee; he can't walk yet without holding on but is very active. I heard from Cleve this mail. They are all well. I hope Edith is not exhausting, instead of recruiting, her much tried (walking) strength.

Your very affectionate Ma, MAC.

That letter card was beautifully done up and quite flat -- could not have ‘come open’.
Diary, 1870

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1870. In this year she became 57, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 14 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

There are two loose pages of titles of books or articles headed ‘Mrs Chaplin’ at the front of the 1870 diary. For example: ‘Ancient and Modern India’; ‘New England’ Dr Cotton; ‘Prose Composition’ Laurie; ‘Life of Cardinal Pole’ Hook; ‘Life of Galileo from letters’; ‘Journal of Waterloo Campaign’ by General Cavalié Mercer – 2 vols. Some titles are French. From this and from other evidence in her diaries it is apparent that Mrs Chaplin read widely and often.

January

Saturday 1

Mr Pyne, Miss James, Mary and Constance dined with us. Cleve sat by me all his tea and enjoyed himself more than anyone. John and Louie hard at work, the former came in the evening.

[John Skinner and Louisa (MAC’s daughter) had married six years earlier. Mr Pyne is Henry Pyne, MAC’s son Ayrton’s father-in-law; Miss James is Mary Anne James, the unmarried sister of Mr Pyne’s wife Harriet; Mary and Constance are daughters of Harriet and Henry Pyne. Cleve is a grandson of MAC.]

Sunday 2

At Christchurch H D preached on "wait on the Lord and he will refresh you," alluded to the progress of humanity towards goodness. L. and J. dined with us -- I called on Mrs Nelson.

[L and J – Louisa and John Skinner]

Monday 3

Packing to go to Scotland. Louie came in the afternoon. Cleve happily put himself under Julia’s wing when he knew I was going away. Left at quarter to 8. Holroyd with us to the station. A fine warm evening, which was not to have been expected after the intense cold of last week. Pleasant fellow travellers and all our wraps to soften our hard beds made the journey not so bad.

[Julia is MAC’s eldest daughter, 33 years old, who seems to live with her mother.

Tuesday 4

At daybreak at Berwick - arrived in Edinburgh at eight o'clock, drizzling rain - long waiting for a cab -- had a pleasant breakfast with Mrs Thorne and her nice intelligent children – Mattie [Matilda Charlotte Chaplin] went with her to lectures on chemistry and physiology. I ordered in food and got into our lodging at 8 Wharton Place. Pleasant windows looking upon Heriot’s hospital (a school), fine building but windows too small to give it a smiling aspect -- a school should look as bright and light as possible. I see a few boys about the grounds.

Wednesday 5

I went with Mrs T and Mattie to lectures at the college - physiology interesting, chemistry not so. In the evening, a deeply interesting lecture by Geikie on the geology of these parts. Mainly walked in the afternoon. Reading Froude’s History first volume -- this is a real history of the country, no padding. Every page desirable. Mr Pyne would write in this style judging from his book.

Thursday 6

Letter from Julia -- wrote to her. Walked with Mattie to college then strolled on looking at old books. Read. Walked to Princes Street. The irregularity of the land on which this city is built gives a charming novelty to each - now a bridge then flights of steps and quaint old buildings. After this Princes Street comes and one seems to be in another city. Shopkeepers generally civil but with an independent bearing that is agreeable. At Mrs T’s in the evening. She and Mattie out.

[8 Wharton Place was ‘our’ lodging, but Mattie seems to be with Mrs Thorne, presumably a friend providing a home from home in Edinburgh. It seems that she was studying medicine temporarily to be with Mattie, who was doing it for real.]

Friday 7

Wrote to Ayrton. Read Froude’s History - the futile (?)ory laws and Henry 8th laws against immorality, yet it is hoped to check vice by the "Contagious Diseases Bill" by simply attacking women. Went to lecture on geology – subject - action of water in changing the earth’s form. Niagara will no longer be the huge waterfall when the water has wasted the bed of shale beneath it -- it will become a great rapid.

Saturday 8

Read Froude’s History and remain convinced that had Henry 8th married a good woman he might have been to the end a great King. Went to ladies’ meeting on the Contagious Diseases Bill -- about six present. All agreed that men required reclaiming to a condition of purity and virtue. One pleasing young woman spoke against immodesty in dress.

Sunday 9

Went to a small high church -- sermon nil -- singing cheerful. Afternoon visited Mrs Robbins. Tea with Mrs Thorne.

Monday 10

Wrote to Holroyd and Mrs Skinner and John. Went to lecture on "the pulse." Saw ingenious mechanical apparatus invented by an American for testing same, is more certain than the human finger. It must assist science as there are half a dozen observations at least. Besides counting the beats it can't quite replace it. Read of the iniquities of the Church in 1529 of which the adversaries seem rather to be the people set apart if any are.

[What were the iniquities of the church in 1529? I think this was just before the English Reformation]]

Tuesday 11

Received letters from Edward and Holroyd. Wrote to Holroyd and sent letter. Went to lecture on circulation of blood. In the afternoon walked alone to Holyrood through the worst part of town. A half-crazed or tipsy woman offered me a big old muff for sale saying she had quarrelled with her husband. Too dark to see anything of the building. Evening at Mrs Thorne's -- read Froude’s History.

Wednesday 12

Letter from Julia. Went to lecture on circulation of blood which makes the whole round of the vessels and back to the heart in 25 to 30 seconds. Walked to the "Meadows" -- frost sharp. Mattie sliding all the way. Went to geological lecture by Geikie in the evening, takes 11,000 years for the rain etc to wash off one foot of earth in the (?) valley how small are (?) of time past

Thursday 13

Wrote to Allan. Went to lecture on "supply of blood to the head" -- called on Mrs Kell. Emily K in bed -- how are sadly her abilities are wasted. In the evening went to May Thorn's birthday party -- by way of forfeit hopped three times round the room saying etc “mother what a fool I am" -- much to the children’s’ amusement. A most childlike sweet party of little well brought up children -- even to the baby of 18 months.

Friday 14

Wrote to Julia -- finished the first volume of Froude’s History and despair of getting the second out of the college library. A fall of snow and thaw makes the streets in a difficult condition for passengers. In the evening at Geikie’s lecture, subject - lands once covered by water with proofs in shells and bone caves.

Saturday 15

Went to the museum with the little Thornes, examined the stuffed animals all looking rather mangy but with their skeletons beside them -- very improving. Forgot the invitation to accompany Geikie on geological excursion round Arthur's Seat.

Sunday 16

Heard a very good sermon from Doctor Alexander -- who well proved three separate visits of women to the Saviour’s tomb – observing that in trying to prove scripture by the gospels more rather than less proof was obtained.

Monday 17

Emily Robbins called. Mrs Thorne and girls dined with us in the evening. Mattie and I went to a meeting at Queen Street Hall, about 1,500 present. Good speeches by Professor Masson and and Dr Playfair on the justice of giving the franchise to women, i.e. giving them their rights. Twenty years hence it will be "old times" indeed when they had not those rights. In 50 years these will be the dark ages of women and their education.

Tuesday 18

Physiological lecture, weather warm.

Wednesday 19

Lecture in the morning -- wrote to Louie and Julia -- received letter from Louie telling me that Cleve was to go to the kindergarten. The little man asked how many there were in the school (“40”. “Shall I be head boy?”) In the evening lecture on geology. Went to dressmaker, explored Vennel and grass market.

Thursday 20

Wrote to Ayrton and Mrs McCann. Explored grass market West bow(?) and Cowgate, walked to Mrs Kell’s. In the evening lecture on breathing to restore drowned persons -- lay them on the face, keep warm by any means, move the chest to initiate respiration, clear mouth and nose out, lift the arms and let them drop. Persevere. In the evening at Mrs Kell’s heard of Jesse Forrest -- now Mrs Arthur Bligh, with a son at Cambridge. She, her husband and two daughters going to Australia.

Friday 21

Went to physiological lecture on the lungs, air etc. In the afternoon call on Miss Smith, a friend of Dr Drysdales who was most genial and kind. In the evening went to Mr Geikie’s last lecture -- on volcanoes chiefly. These lectures have been most interesting to the ignorant -- intelligible to all by the maps and illustrations. Wrote to Julia.

Saturday 22

Received letter from Julia. Went in the afternoon to Holyrood to meet Geikie and his disciples -- thence we about 200 went to Arthur's Seat. On the way he stopped to explain the volcanic eruptions which had formed these hills, the last being Arthur's Seat, and on the way down looked at the rock which is evidence of the glacial period in the Queen's Drive.

Sunday 23

Went to Iron Church. Good sermon -- Mr MacGregor. Wrote to Miss Martin and Holroyd

Monday 24

Letter from Louie to say that J E H S had passed his matriculation exam, also from Ayrton. Went to lecture, also to buy satin, same price as in London. Very misty. Wrote to Louie. In the evening to Mrs Thorne's.

Tuesday 25

Went to lecture. Walked along the meadow. Wrote to Frederick, reading Pouchet’s popularised science of geology.

Wednesday 26

Went to lecture. Read letter from Frederick with present -- wrote to Ayrton -- dined with Mrs Nichol, a very intelligent old lady; discussed the Contagious Diseases Act. Two young doctors came in the evening.

[The 1864 Contagious Diseases Act, required prostitutes to be given an intrusive physical examination fortnightly which led to all kinds of abuse and particularly affected poor women. The fight against it was led by Josephine Butler. In 1870 she wrote an article in the Daily News, accompanied or followed by a petition for repeal. She didn’t hesitate to use strong language, describing the examination as surgical rape, and inviting rich men to offer their own daughters to enable young men to ‘sow their wild oats,’ in effect charging them with hypocrisy and double standards. The Act was repealed in 1886. See also ‘Background.doc’ in the Letters folder]

Thursday 27

Received letter from Louie. Wrote to Julia -- sent letter to Frederick. Went to lecture on physiology. In the afternoon went with Mattie and Mrs Thorne and children to Duddingston Pool to skate. I walked on pondering on Scott and J E H. S’s resemblance to him, saw the cottage near the Lodge called Jenny Deans’s -- frost not very severe -- nor many skaters. Many pretty robust looking girls. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening, read Pouchet.

Friday 28

Received letter from Julia. Went to lecture on action of nerves. In the afternoon went to Duddingston Lock with Mattie and the Thornes. The frost increased in intensity and very fine, sun setting pink on the ice. Walked home alone, enjoying the great beauty of the hill outlines and rugged landscape. The rocks are familiar faces to me now -- a walk in view of them is like a visit to a friend. Wrote to Mme Celli and Ann.

Saturday 29

No letters. Read the sad history of prostitution -- the proposed extension of diseases act or any diseases act seems to me like patching up a cure without going to the root of the evil, see Dr Aston's regulations at Aldershot where the sin is recognised and sanctioned by authority and is the trade of the beer houses as much as the sale of liquor. Wrote to Louie. Walked to the other side of the town. Asked my way of the most courteous old lady I ever met par hazard, walked and talked with me.

Sunday 30

Went to Iron Church. Walked to Mrs Kell's. Tea with Mrs Thorne. Letters from Edith, Louie and Holroyd.

[Louisa and Holroyd her children, Edith her daughter-in-law.]

Monday 31

Went to lecture on bile -- in the afternoon to national picture gallery, very interesting collection and admirably useful for students. In the evening at Mrs Thorne's.

February

Tuesday 1

Letter from Louie and Julia. Wrote to them and to Holroyd. Went again to picture gallery, to find interiors of St. Peter’s and Basilica of St. Paul by Pannini – a head of David Martin by himself, must be an ancestor of Charles Martin, so like the family.

Wednesday 2

Lecture on kidneys and their function. Miss McClaren a nice sensible girl called Lea, at Mrs Thorne's

Thursday 3

Letter from Louie. Wrote to Edith with two photos. Saw a magnificent sunset -National Gallery and Scott’s monument in foreground then the castle - lower part sea mist and the sun a large ball of fire, sky lurid red and stormy dark clouds. Went in the evening with Mrs Thorne and Mattie to McLarens - the old McC has a very grand head -- charming daughters. All the lady students there, Miss Peachey graceful, nice head.

Friday 4

Letter from Holroyd. Wrote to Julia. Lecture interesting, on hair and skin. Called on Emily Robbins. In the evening at Mrs Thorne's -- read Froude while she and Mattie worked at chemistry.

Saturday 5

Worked in the morning. Afternoon walked on the south side of Arthur's Seat, saw a fine rainbow against the grass slope as we entered which reached across Arthur's Seat then a fainter one in the far distance - views very fine under a changing stormy sky – sunset red fire against the rocky hillside. Mattie very tired. Weather unseasonably warm. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Sunday 6

Went to Dr Alexander’s -- a good sermon -- the power given by Christ to the disciples when he left them, and to them only.

Monday 7

Letter from Edith. Called on Mrs Kell. Went to lecture. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening. Read history of Ireland in Froude. Top blown off our chimney and room full of smoke all day. Went to Mrs Kell’s to get out of it and passed the morning there. Wind very high.

Tuesday 8

Wrote to Louie. Went to lecture, began taking notes on the nerve system. Letter from Julia -- went to Mrs Kell's to get out of the smoke. Chimney pot set on. Sent Dr Ma…’s(?)'s clever little book to Ayrton, little Joe Bonomi and Maud Skinner. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening -- she went to London as witness for Dr Edmonds.

Wednesday 9

Went to lecture. Letter from Ayrton, sent parcel to B. Sq. Looked at section of tooth etc through microscope. Emecke in Paris, Rochefort and Hourens leading the mob, barricade up. Weather very cold.
[From the Encyclopedia Britannica: Victor-Henri, Marquis de Rochefort - gifted polemical journalist under the Second Empire and the Third Republic who distinguished himself, at first, as a supporter of the extreme left and later as a champion of the extreme right. Rochefort's career began in 1868 with the founding of the weekly newspaper La Lanterne, which was speedily suppressed for its outspoken opposition to Napoleon III. He was elected to the Corps Législatif by a Paris constituency in 1869. When the empire fell the following year, he became a member of the emergency government of national defense. His open support of the revolutionary Paris Commune (1871) led to his condemnation under military law.]

Thursday 10

Wrote to Edith. Lecture on brain and its functions. Snow fell. In the evening Mrs Thorne returned from London. Mattie walked alone. Emecke(?) soon quelled. Sent parcel to London, received letter from Mr Celli. Little Thornes had tea with us and seemed to enjoy ‘it’. What? The change of room I suppose.

Friday 11

Beautiful effect of snow on Herriot's hospital. Succeeded in making pretty good notes of lecture. Weather becoming warmer. Went out in the afternoon with Mattie to St. Andrews Square.

Saturday 12th

Sent Valentine to Cleve. Weather intensely cold. Snow. Letter from Julia. Mattie went to hospital.

Sunday 13

Heard a good sermon, Congregational Church. Dined with Mattie at Professor Masson's, his daughter aged 14 the most charming and dignified girl I ever saw at that age – simple, unaffected and pretty. Her dignity of perfect good manners – aristocracy etc manner all nonsense. Mr and Mrs M -- delightful people.

Monday 14

Went to lecture. Called on Mrs Kell in the afternoon. Sorry to find Emily in bed. Wrote to Julia and Holroyd. Thawing but still very cold.

Tuesday 15

Short letter from Holroyd. Wrote to Mrs Nelson. Weather damp. Called at Chalmers Hospital etc. The matron a pretty looking piquante little French woman with a fine head. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening. Reading Chamber’s Rebellion of ‘45 -- can't get Froude’s history.
[ From the Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2000:
The Jacobite rebellion
Britain's involvement in the War of the Austrian Succession, Tory and popular anger at the political deals that followed Walpole's resignation, and the infighting among the Whig elite were the background to the Jacobite rebellion of 1745-46 (the Forty-five). Since Britain was now at odds with France, the latter power was willing to sponsor an invasion on behalf of the Stuart dynasty. It hoped that such an invasion would win support from the masses and from the Tory sector of the landed class. Although a handful of Tory conspirators encouraged these hopes, the degree of their commitment is open to question. A large-scale French naval invasion of Britain in early 1744 failed in part because these men would not commit themselves to action. In July 1745 the Old Pretender's eldest son, Charles Edward Stuart (the Young Pretender), landed in Scotland without substantial French aid. In September he and some 2,500 Scottish supporters defeated a British force of the same size at the Battle of Prestonpans. In December, with an army of 5,000 men, he marched into England and got as far south as the town of Derby, some 150 miles from London.
Charles's initial success owed much to the ineptitude, the unconcern even, of Britain's rulers. One problem was that the standing army was too small, consisting of some 62,000 men. Because of Britain's involvement in the War of the Austrian Succession, the bulk of this force was in Flanders and Germany. Only 4,000 men had been left to defend Scotland, and most of them were raw recruits. Moreover, hampered by internal divisions, the administration was slow to respond. When the Young Pretender landed, the Pelhams were anxious but Carteret, now Earl of Granville, was not. Nor, at the beginning, was George II, who was actually in Hanover when his rival for the throne landed. As a result of these squabbles and misunderstandings, Parliament did not assemble until Oct. 17, 1745. Because by law only Parliament could authorize money to pay the militia (Britain's civil defense force), this delay seriously impeded early resistance to the Jacobite force. The city of Carlisle in the north of England surrendered to the rebels in November largely because its militia had received no pay from the government or from anyone else for two months.
Some historians have argued that the mass of Britain's population cared little which dynasty ruled them at this time and that the Young Pretender would have regained the kingdom for the Stuarts if only he had pressed on to London. Clearly, this thesis can never be proved one way or the other. The Jacobites, however, did not try to march on to London but retreated to Scotland. Nonetheless, it is probably significant that the Young Pretender attracted scarcely any English supporters on his march to Derby. Only in Manchester, which had a large Catholic population, did he gain recruits--some 200 men, mostly unemployed weavers. No Tory landowner or politician joined him, nor did any men of influence or wealth come out in his favour. By contrast, once the seriousness of the invasion was recognized, many individuals joined home-defense units or subscribed money against it. Between September and December 57 civilian loyal associations are known to have been founded in 38 different counties. Merchants and traders in the prosperous towns--Liverpool, Norwich, Exeter, Bristol, and most of all London--were particularly prominent in loyalist activity.
Although many Britons had become disillusioned by events after Walpole's fall, probably few were seriously tempted by the prospect of a Jacobite restoration. The Young Pretender, a Roman Catholic, was viewed as the pawn of France, Britain's enemy and prime commercial and imperial competitor. Traditionally the Catholic religion and French politics were associated with absolutist government, religious persecution, and assaults on liberty. These prejudices worked against the Young Pretender's appeal, as did prejudices against the Scottish Highlanders, the bulk of his armed supporters, who were regarded as terrifying barbarians by many of the English. The lack of mass English support for the Stuarts in 1745 dissuaded the French government from sending substantial military aid to the rebels. On April 16, 1746, the Duke of Cumberland (George II's second son) defeated the Jacobite army at Culloden in northern Scotland. This was the last major land battle to occur in Great Britain. The Young Pretender escaped to France and finally died in 1788, sodden with drink and disillusionment.
The main result of the Forty-five was the British government's decision to integrate Scotland, and particularly the Scottish Highlands, more fully into the rest of the kingdom.]

Wednesday 16

Received letters from Louie, Holroyd, Maud and Mr Bonomi. Weather mild and wet but we walked to Mrs Calverley’s, saw some beautiful amateur miniature painting. Went to a stationer’s - a great difference between the tradesmen's manners on this and the other side of town. Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 17

No letters. Went to lecture. Walked to Stockbridge to see Louie's friend Miss (?). She was at dinner. Wrote to Allan.

Friday 18

Letters from Holroyd and Julia. Went to lecture, very interesting - on nerves. Worked. Walked to Mrs Masson's. Took tea with her. Wrote to Holroyd and Julia. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Saturday 19

Received letter from Ayrton, examined brain of sheep with Mattie, Mrs Thorne and another. Evidence of the wonderful perfection of creation. Walked in the afternoon to the Calton Hill. Edinburgh surpasses Athens I think in all its peculiar beauties. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Sunday 20

Went to hear Dr (?) but he did not preach very good sermon, on Christ washing disciples’ feet. Weather cold.

Monday 21

Went to lecture. Letter from Ayrton. Weather very cold. Mr Hughes clergyman called, also Mrs McNab. Mattie went to the poorhouse and to Mrs Stewart's, in the evening reported that piquante little French woman as charming as usual.

Tuesday 22

Letter from Holroyd. Went to lecture, then to Stephen Oliphant’s school in Charlotte Square. 100 children being instructed, girls and boys together in 4 classes -- each class one master except the smallest where two Governesses were teaching them to read. Teachers and children lovely, rooms large and airy -- terms about £6 per ann. Weather dry and fine, went to lunch at Miss Smiths, wrote to Ayrton and Julia.

Wednesday 23

Wrote to Julia. Received letter from her -- went to lecture -- did not go out in the afternoon, the weather so wet.

Thursday 24

Letter from Louie. Heavy fall of snow, four or five inches deep. Did not go to lecture or out except to Mrs Thorne's. Answered Louie's letter, read Chambers History of the rebellion of ‘45.

Friday 25

Letter from Julia -- wrote to her. Did not go to lecture. Deep snow. Went out, Mattie went to see Mrs Kell. Wrote to Holroyd. The college youths amused themselves with snowballing for which some were taken by the police -- ladies not pelted.

Saturday 26

Letter from Louie. Snow deeper I am told that it has been for some years. Lads amused us by snowballing just opposite our windows. They did not annoy elderly men or females. Went out for short walk.

Sunday 27

Did not go out all day. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Monday 28

No letters. Wrote to Edward, Mr Saltwell, Mr Celli. Went to lecture. Afternoon, walked beyond the High School to enjoy a fine view. A wonderfully rapid thaw. Six inches deep of snow nearly thawed in 24 hours. The papers say 10in North of Edinburgh -- none in England.

March

Tuesday 1

Letters from Julia and Louie telling me of Cleve's illness. Wrote to Julia. Went to lecture on inflammation. In the afternoon to Mrs Kell, had tea there. Called on Miss McLaren. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Wednesday 2

Letter from Julie. They think Cleve has whooping cough. Called on Mr Ellis’s niece Mrs McNab very pleasant and genial, saw some good photos by White of Glasgow. At Mrs Thorne in the evening. Miss Olapperton came in. Weather very fine.

Thursday 3

Letters from Julia, Louie and Holroyd. I wrote to the two first. Went to see the workings of Mr McLachlan’s school of 180 children. Very good teaching of all kinds. Miss Smith called – read Sir A Grant’s "Recess Studies". At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Friday 4

Letters from Louie and Julia. Went to see working of normal school, 800 under instruction, some training, some learning -- a fine play ground and in it a tree said to be planted by Mary 2 of Scotts when the diocese was the residence of the Regent Murray. Wrote to Julia.

Saturday 5

Letter from Julia. Walked into Princes Street in the afternoon -- very full of pedestrians as it was very fine. Scarcely any carriages. Tea at Mrs Thorne’s.

Sunday 6

Went to Dr Alexander’s -- called on Mrs Kell. Emily looked unhealthy. Wrote to Julia and Agnes

Monday 7

Went to lecture. Walked with Mattie in the afternoon to Princes Street. Weather unusually fine. At Mrs Thorne’s in the evening.

Tuesday 8

Received letters from Julia, Mrs Skinner, and Mme. Celli, with introduction to Mrs Grasice. Went to Stockbridge to call upon her; she was out. In the evening at a pleasant soirée at Mrs Masson's. Talked with Mrs Burnett, Sir A Grant President of the University there and a brother of Carlyle's, also Professor Blackie. Sir A Grant talked much with Mattie.

Wednesday 9

Left Edinburgh at quarter to 10 pm for London, arrived in London at half to 9. Found Cleve pale from whooping cough. Edward very poorly in bed, the rest well.

Thursday 10

Arrived at King's Cross station at half to 9 a.m. as written on Wednesday. Miss Nelson called. Wrote to Mattie. Louie here all day.

Friday 11

Walked to Gower Street to make enquiries for Louie. Called on Mrs Pyne -- did not seen her as she had come to my house. I saw Mr P., Constance and Miss James who reported all the babies well. Wrote to Mattie. Louie here all day.

Saturday 12

Walked to Marylebone Lane. Wrote to Mattie. Louie here all day.

Sunday 13

Went to Christchurch with Holroyd, then to a lecture by Huxley on the dark and fair races which have peopled Britain. Mr James passed 8 hours here and talked trash all the time

[Who was this? Thomas James died 1853 and his son Thomas Andrew James in 1841].

Monday 14

At home all morning. Walked in the afternoon to B…s’s(?) to execute some messages for Agnes. Louie here all day. Cleve much better. In the evening letter from J D H S announcing that he would return from Manchester that evening.

Tuesday 15

At home all morning. Wrote to and received letter from Mattie. Out in afternoon, called on Miss Nelson. J E H S called. Holroyd out in the evening. Edward and Cleve better. Whooping cough very distressing to a child by reason of the dread of the coming spasm. I think there must be a feeling of strangling as he saw he had his band round him at night.

Thursday 17

John Sharpe came in the evening, he and Edward amused themselves and us with gentle cheerful music.

Friday 18

I walked a little before dinner, wrote to Mattie. Julia went to see Misses Shurr. Miss S. completed her 93rd year this month, was stitching a shirt collar and enjoying conversation. Louie came in the afternoon. J E H S in the evening.

Saturday 19

Went to Greenwich -- saw little Julia playing in the Park. She recognised me and was pleased to see me. Edward and Emma gardening -- Holroyd came in the evening and we returned by London Bridge and Underground. I went by Holborn Viaduct for the first time.

[Little Julia as distinct from Julia. The latter being MAC’s daughter, the former being the daughter of MAC’s brother Edward, who lived at Greenwich, his wife being Emma.]

Sunday 20

At Christ Church, sermon on National Education

Monday 21

Louie here. I called on the Pynes.

Tuesday 22

Julia went to the dentist. At home all morning. At Mrs Pyne’s in the evening, and Holroyd came in late and returned home with me. Louie here. She went with Julia to meet Ellen at 5 York Street, as they were afraid baby would catch whooping cough. All hope of the arrival of the missing American ship Boston abandoned. Wrote to Mattie.

Thursday 24

Louie came here. Went in the afternoon with Julia to call on Mrs Lebéque and Miss L Shurr - saw there Miss Jessie Landseer, sister of Sir Edward Landseer.

Friday 25

Louie came. Snow in the afternoon. Went in the evening to a meeting on the educational question. Speakers Mill, Fawcell the blind philosopher -- Auberon Herbert who is an earnest good patriot truly philanthropic – St James’s hall full of people of various classes. Holroyd and Louie with me. Wrote to Ayrton and Allan.

Saturday 26

Snowing fast all morning - thawed in the afternoon. At four o'clock went to a meeting in Hanover Square Rooms. Mill etc addressed the meeting. Mrs Taylor in the chair. Miss Taylor quite an orator "tra" or "tress." Hall full.

Sunday 27

Went to St Michael’s Church -- called on the Pynes.

Monday 28

Letter from Mattie. Wrote to her. Walked to Baker Street. Read Garibaldi's "Rule of the Monk". Very interesting as a medium through which to read his character -- his denunciation of the papacy is lofty yet humourous. Julia with bad toothache. Louie here. J E H. away. Cleve better.
[From Encyclopaedia Britannica: Garibaldi was responsible for most of the military victories of the Risorgimento, not least because he was one of the great masters of guerrilla warfare. Almost equally important was his contribution as a propagandist to the unification of Italy. Himself a man of the common people, he knew far better than Cavour or Mazzini how to reach the masses with the new message of patriotism. Furthermore, the fact that he used his military and political gifts for liberal or nationalist causes coincided well with current fashion and brought him great acclaim. In addition, he attracted support by being a truly honest man who asked little for himself.]

Tuesday 29

Julia went to dentist. Miss James called. I walked to Victoria Press. Louie here. Holroyd and Edward not home to dinner.

Wednesday 30

Read Garibaldi's book. Letter from Mattie. Went to Notting Hill to find Mr Froebel respecting kindergarten, did not succeed. Called on Georgina. Louie here. Charlie Celli came in the evening, read interesting papers on CD acts.

Thursday 31

Called on Mrs Nelson. Saw them all and paid bills. Ottie Stewards’s sixth birthday.

[Walter John Wyndham Steward was six on 30.3.1870].


April

Friday 1

Called on Mrs McCann who told me that a duel arose when she was a child, because her mother boxed the ears of a spoilt child who threw pellets of bread in her face. The father demanded an apology from her father who, refusing, a dual ended when the latter was severely wounded in the arm.

Saturday 2

Mattie came home. Lunched with Louie to meet Gustave Hourens who talked republicanism in an amusing and earnest spirit. He appears to be a good man.

Sunday 3
Went to Christ Church. Louie dined here. John came in the evening

Monday 4

Walked to Edgware Road. Weather extremely cold. Holroyd went to Bedford on business.

Tuesday 5

Miss Fogerty arrived from India and lunched here with her little brother and sister. Afterwards she took some lodgings. Called on Louie.

Wednesday 6

Miss Fogerty wrote to say she did not want those lodgings. The landlady justly claims a week's rent. Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. Mattie, Louie and Holroyd went to the Slades. Called at the Pynes. Took Cleve out. First fine spring day, South wind. Ada Dixon called.

Thursday 7

Called on Louie. Took Cleve out for the first time since his cough -- the first fine day with South wind. In the evening J & L, Mr B(?), H Celli & young Butler of the BM took tea with us. They talked Greek. Florance had a little girl

[This was Lilian Grace Caroline Steward, who married Adolfo Arturo Burlamacchi].

Friday 8

Took Cleve out. Visited Georgina - then by omnibus to Maddox Street to see the Derreys. Julia with me to Georgina's. All this for 11d, comfortably. Mrs Pyne called.

Saturday 9

At home in the morning. Wrote to Ayrton. Louie came. Ada Dixon called.

Sunday 10

Went to Christ Church. Louie dined here. Arthur Dixon and Charlie called here in the evening. The former after his manual work at Crewe seems to be physically and as far as I could judge morally a fine specimen of mankind.

Monday 11

Took Cleve out

Tuesday 12

Went to church. In the evening to Mr Kent’s(?). Examined corals,. Saw beautiful ferns. Mattie with me.

Wednesday 13

Went to York Street to meet Ellen, thence to call on Mrs H Jones who was out, thence to Miss Skinner who went into raptures over a hideous ill-painted portrait of herself by Smidt. Holroyd went to Croyde. Louie came here.

Thursday 14

Louie came here. I went to Miss Dykes. Mr Celli passed the day here. Little Cleve very poorly. Mattie advises trying chloral.

Friday 15

Went to Christ Church. Pauline Dardis with me. Julia at St Cyprians. Cleve not so well. Went with Mattie to examine objects through the microscope. W S Kent came back with us to take tea here. C Celli at tea here. Louie and Johnny here.

Saturday 16

Cleve better, into the square garden most of the day. Letter from Holroyd. Florrie very ill. Called at Mrs Evegards. Louie here in the afternoon. Mattie and Julia went to Miss Skinner's and the Jones’s.

Monday 18

Called on Helen Grenfell, saw her two fine boys, Nic four months old - one a wonderfully fine child. In the afternoon went to Sevenoaks to look for lodgings for Louie and Cleve, got out by mistake at Shoreham Station and altogether walked about eight miles, then obliged to walk up and down the platform for 25 minutes as the evening was very cold -- train that much late.

Tuesday 19

Shine came to take an affectionate leave of us. Holroyd returned late from Croyde.

Wednesday 20

John went with Shine and his boy to the docks and saw him off, the poor fellow will at least get a good meal or two every day during the voyage. Mrs Nelson and Miss Dardis called.

Thursday 21

Went in the square with Cleve in the morning -- drove across the park with him in the afternoon. M. Hourens called. Julia, Holroyd and Edward went to John Sharpe’s in the evening. Miss James called.

Friday 22

In the square with Cleve in the morning. Afternoon called on Georgina who spoke of the serious illness of Morland. Louie went out with Cleve. Mattie painted at the British Museum.

Saturday 23

Louie's birthday. She dined here, drove out with Cleve


May

Monday 2

Weather extremely cold -- 38. The papers compare this temperature with the year of the Crimean War, 1855. Received letter from Julia at Tunbridge Wells and from Ayrton. The house dull without them all. Consoled myself with Mattie's clever painting of the wounded Amazon. Received a letter from Alan -- news of his expected returned home.

Tuesday 3

Called on Louie. Saw Mrs Hoffman about the kinder garten. Called on M..Celli, saw Miss Sullivan now properly clothed and in her right mind, and young Scatola. At Mrs Pyne's in the evening, met Dr Wilkinson who is a red Republican. Sorry Florance could not be there.

Wednesday 4

To Marshal & Snel. for Agnes. Mrs Greathead called. In the evening went to an interesting lecture on "Palestine Explorations". It is surprising that work so interesting, especially one would suppose to the clergy, and requiring only an annual £5,000, should be languishing for want of funds.

Thursday 5

Louie came. We drew first sketch of kinder garten. Called on Ellen. Baby very bright and intelligent for eight months, will talk soon I think. Called on Mrs McCann, alone in the evening. Edward and Holroyd at Arthur Clifford's. Read a good sketch of Yedo in Japan.

Friday 6

Went to Greenwich. Slept there. Little Julie grown, she shows great observation of colours and general intelligence. Read en route a pretty novel "Hotel du Petit St Jean," scene in south of France. The writer knows it so well. I think he must have been there.

Saturday 7

Emma took me for a drive to Shooters Hill. The country looks dreary and backward, things seem rather to have shrunk than expanded during this cold week. Met Holroyd at Notting Hill and went with him a to look at houses.

Sunday 8

At Christ Church. Called on Kevin Morland, wife and boy came in to tea.

Monday 9

Walked about Maida Hill, house-seeking for Holroyd. Louie came from Tunbridge Wells -- brought well printed letter from C. Plebiscite going on against the government in the large towns.

Tuesday 10

Went with Alice Evegard to Hanover Sq Rooms with concert tickets -- doors all closed – wondered, and then discovered it was for the 17th. Saw Louie and John.

Wednesday 11

Went to Notting Hill to see Mrs Hoffman about kinder garten, we deplored together that parents will not see the disadvantage to children of ever leaving them with coarse ignorant persons. Saw a house in Ladbroke Grove, likely to send Holroyd. Expected Julia and Cleve but did not come. Holroyd and John went to the opening of London University.

[This probably refers to the London University Building, Burlington Gardens, which is or was at the back of the Royal Academy. Although founded in 1836, the University had no place of its own until the erection thirty-three years later of this building, after designs by Pennethorne.

Thursday 12

Julia and Cleve returned from Tunbridge Wells. I took him to Louie after dinner and went in the evening with Julia and Holroyd to John Sharpe's -- he read an interesting paper on Pernambuco -- his is a very rare fine character. Rained in the afternoon.

Friday 13

Called on Mrs Pyne with Cleve. Rained all morning. John and Louie came.

Saturday 14

Went with Holroyd to look at houses

Monday 16

Louie came here. Went to that Ludgate Hill etc. to order frames. Edward returned from Ellen’s. Heard of Allan having taken his passage for England -- and we expected him hourly

Thursday 19

On this day at 5.50 Allan came to Charing Cross Station having left England Nov 10th 1860. I should not have known him; but from the strong family likeness, others would know him to be my child. In character and mind much the same, his langour from ill-health contrasts strongly with his boyish energy and helpful activity when last I saw him.

Saturday 28

Went this evening to hear the Baboo Keshab Chunder Sen’s eloquent oration on the principles of Christianity and practice of the same. St. James Hall full of attentive listeners.

Sunday 29

Went to St. Paul’s to hear Liddon, a fine sermon addressed to the judges & counsel, Mayor and corporation, on brotherly love and charity - text "Am I my brother’s keeper?"

Monday 30

Julia went to Mrs Newton's drawing class


June

Wednesday 1

My 57th birthday and I thank God that I am so well in health and so happy w. the various relations of my life. I called on Alice Grenfell and saw her fine baby. Went to the Royal Academy with Julia -- charming picture by Millais of Walter Raleigh when a boy listening to a sailor’s story.

Thursday 2

John took Cleve to Kensington. I called on Mrs Howard, she and Ada just going the dreary tour of the park in an open carriage. Julia went to a concert with Allan and Holroyd

Friday 3

Agnes came to us after an absence of two and a half years. Maud Skinner also John Louie and Allan at dinner.

[Agnes Nugent Ayrton, MAC’s niece]

Saturday 4

Went with Cleve to see Miss L. Shurr on her 78th birthday. She looked about 65, dressed simply in very good taste. Never did a bouquet of flowers give greater pleasure than mine to her, and Cleve gave his little bunch of lilies of the valley, very pretty, holding them behind him to surprise her. They all went to see Ellen J. I enjoyed my quiet evening with my book as I seldom get the quiet moment for reading

Whit Monday 6

Went to Louie’s to luncheon with Cleve to meet the Robins’, one sang sweetly.

Tuesday 7

Went with Cleve to Primrose Hill, took his bread and butter and milk and water for a picnic -- fine day. He delighted in a party of little national school boys playing cricket, their conversation and manner very good and he might well have played with them alone.

Wednesday 8

At home in the morning. Agnes went to Greenwich, walked with Cleve in the evening.

Thursday 9

Mrs Williams and girls called. Agnes here at breakfast after which she went to her Aunt’s. In the evening at Louie’s -- about 20 of us. John, Louie, Maud and Edward acted a charade "Insolent,” admirably conceived and acted. Mrs Sharpe, the Robbinses, Jock Harding were there. Charles Dickens died.

Friday 10

Maud called. Went to Louie’s in the afternoon. When I read the account of Charles Dickens death in the paper I felt as if I had lost a friend. While he lay a-dying I was reading the last printed work of his vivid imagination. Received letter from Ayrton mentioning Allan's illness.

Saturday 11

Received no telegram so concluded Allan was better. Did not go to M. Celli’s concert. Walked out with Cleve.

Monday 13

Received letter from Ayrton telling me of Allan's serious illness so I left London by twelve o'clock train. Louie and Cleve went to Margate. Arrived at station at a quarter to eight or later, my great anxiety was relieved by hearing from de Lacy Hughes that Allan was much better. Saw Baby asleep. She is like her father.

[MAC went to Looe in Cornwall – Ayrton was the Vicar and Allan was staying with him. The baby must have been Ayrton’s daughter Ursula, born in November 1969]

Friday 17

Allan better and went out for a drive

[At this point a press cutting about the French declaration of war:
THE FRENCH DECLARATION OF WAR
The following is the text of the French Declaration of War, delivered at Berlin on the 19 inst:
The undersigned Chargé d’Affaires of France has the honour, in conformity with the orders he has received from his Government, to bring the following communication to the knowledge of his Excellency the Minister of Foreign Affairs of his Majesty the King of Prussia. The Government of his Majesty the Emperor of the French being unable to view the project of placing a Prussian Prince on the Spanish throne otherwise than as an action directed against the security of the territories of France, found itself obliged to demand of his Majesty the King of Prussia the assurance that such a combination could not be realised with his consent. His Majesty having refused to give any such guarantee, and having, on the contrary, declared to the Ambassador of His Majesty the Emperor of the French that he intends to reserve to himself for that eventuality, as for any other, the right to be guided by circumstances, the Imperial Government has been forced to see in this declaration of the King an arrière pensée menacing in like manner to France and the European equilibrium. This declaration has been rendered worse by the communication made to the different Cabinets of the King's refusal to receive the ambassador of the Emperor, and to enter into any further explanations with him. In consequence hereof the French Government has thought it its duty to take immediate steps for the defence of its honour and its injured interests, and has resolved to adopt, for this object, all measures which the situation in which it has been placed renders necessary. It considers itself from this moment in a state of war against Prussia.
The undersigned has the honour to be, your Excellency etc. Le Sourd, Berlin, June 15]

Saturday 18

Allan would go to London in spite of all persuasion, and not being able to get the pony he went to the station with a pair of horses

Monday 20

At Looe gardening, overlooking man cutting down bank in front of kitchen. Glad to get a note from Allan

Tuesday 21

Gardening. Had pleasant letters from all at home.

Wednesday 22

Glad to hear that Allan reached London without breaking down and having to put up at some hotel etc..

Saturday 25

Left Looe at eight o'clock. Edith and little Ursula quite well, the latter looking solemn, with her little Roman nose. Shopping at Plymouth with Ayrton -- left at 2 o'clock and got to London at 10.

Monday 27

Allan came home from Margate. Spent the evening here. Emma and Julia lunched here. Walked with them to New Street. Miss Lockyers and Sophy Jay(?) passed the evening here -- the latter took a great interest in all concerning the dear child, his toys and books all spread about the table made him so present to me that I could hardly fancy he was away.

Tuesday 28

Went to King's Cross en route for Highgate to see Ellen at half past 9 but through some special inaptitude for railway progression I failed to get from that Station, returned home to dinner and tried again at four o'clock, arrived there duly; all very rural and pretty just now and the scene has beauties of its own which had I not just come from Looe I should have enjoyed more.

Wednesday 29

Tried in the morning to see Dr Newton’s special powers of healing and endured for some time being wedged in a dirty crowd behind the little chapel in Church Street. Obliged to leave, shall try again. Julia went to stay at the Greatheads. Allan came

Thursday 30

Looked for house for Holroyd. Went to Agnes’s in the evening.

July

Friday 1

Paid bills in the morning, worked, wrote letters. Allan dined with us, also Maud.

Saturday 2

Looking for houses with Holroyd

Monday 4

Prince Charles of Hohenzollern put forward as the most likely candidate for the Spanish throne. Opposed by France who dreads the Prussian influence and talks big about war with Prussia if that country upholds this candidate instead of the boy prince -- son of Isabella. What can be expected from the son of this mother?

Tuesday 5

Holroyd went to sleep at Greenwich. Effie staying there.

Wednesday 6

Looking at houses. Letter from Julia saying she was going to join Louie at Margate. Told Llewellyn Davies about the rude ill usage of little boys by gardener which he received apathetically.

Thursday 7

Called on Mrs Pyne. Mrs Nelson and Evegards. Made jam (strawberry).

Friday 8

Looking about for a house for Holroyd. Allan and Edward at dinner, also Maud Skinner. Walked with her to Portman Square -- very tired. Reading "Tower of London." Hepworth Dixon useful historically and agreeably written.

[At this point a press cutting from the Scotsman, Saturday, July 9, 1870, which reads as follows:
“Surgeons’ Hall and the Lady Students -- at a meeting of the lecturers of Surgeons Hall on Thursday, the following resolutions were passed, on the motion of Dr Arthur Gamgee, seconded by Dr Macadam: 1. That it is expedient that lecturers in this medical school should be free to lecture to female as well as to male students.
2. That no restrictions be imposed upon lecturers as to the manner in which instruction is to be imparted to women.
The lecturers were authorised to make what arrangements they considered desirable to carry out these resolutions, either by separate class or in mixed classes.”]

Saturday 9

Effie came to town from Greenwich, we went to look for a house for them. In the evening at Agnes’s. Edward and Allan went to Highgate. Effie and Holroyd returned to Greenwich. Read "Edwin Drood," some of Dickens’s best writing, or is it that in reading it one dwells with interest now on every passage and refuses to see any blemish?

Monday 11

Dined at Greenwich. Allan dined there also. Shopping with Agnes. Went to look at houses for Holroyd

Wednesday 13

Went shopping with Effie to Debenhams to buy (?) her wedding dresses.

[Effie (Euphemia Isabella) Skinner was to be married to Holroyd Chaplin on 16 August. MAC, her energetic future mother-in-law, helps her, maybe because Effie’s own mother is bed-ridden and is anyway far away from London, in South Devon.]

Thursday 14

Louie and Cleve returned from Margate. Allan came. Cleve not looking very well. Julia at Margate. War declared between France and Prussia. France jealous of King William of Prussia supporting Prince of Hohenzollern’s candidature to throne of Spain.

Friday 15

Walked with Cleve to Pynes’s - in the evening Miss Skinner Maud and the Robbins, Will Greathead and Agnes came.

Saturday 16

Up at half past five, went with Louie and Cleve to put Cleve on board the (?) steamer - returned along the Thames Embankment and enjoyed the fresh river breeze. With Agnes in the afternoon - Ayrton Edith and baby Ursula came late at night - Edward Feild at Gravesend with Sh(?).

Monday 18

Engaged with baby, called at Mrs Pyne's. Effie and Holroyd at the Carrs. Edward returned. Allan came in the evening. Everyone talking of the war, French army in eight divisions - fall of Napoleon predicted; all countries promise neutrality -- except Prussia of course.
[From the Encyclopaedia Britannica: FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR (July 19, 1870-May 10, 1871), war in which a coalition of German states led by Prussia defeated France. The war marked the end of French hegemony in continental Europe and resulted in the creation of a unified Germany.
Prussia's defeat of Austria in the Seven Weeks' War in 1866 had confirmed Prussian leadership of the German states and threatened France's position as the dominant power in Europe. The immediate cause of the Franco-German War, however, was the candidacy of Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (who was related to the Prussian royal house) for the Spanish throne, which had been left vacant when Queen Isabella II had been deposed in 1868. The Prussian chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, and Spain's de facto leader, Juan Prim, persuaded the reluctant Leopold to accept the Spanish throne in June 1870. This move greatly alarmed France, who felt threatened by a possible combination of Prussia and Spain directed against it. Leopold's candidacy was withdrawn under French diplomatic pressure, but the Prussian king William I was unwilling to bow to the French ambassador's demands that he promise to never again allow Leopold to be a candidate for the Spanish throne. Bismarck edited William's telegraphed description of this interview, and on July 14 he published this provocative message (the Ems telegram;), which accomplished his purposes of infuriating the French government and provoking it into a declaration of war.
The French emperor, Napoleon III, declared war on Prussia on July 19, 1870, because his military advisers told him that the French army could defeat Prussia and that such a victory would restore his declining popularity in France. The French were convinced that the reorganization of their army in 1866 had made it superior to the German armies. They also had great faith in two recently introduced technical innovations: the breech-loading chassepot rifle, with which the entire army was now equipped; and the newly invented mitrailleuse, an early machine gun. The French generals, blinded by national pride, were confident of victory.
Bismarck, for his part, saw war with France as an opportunity to bring the South German states into unity with the Prussian-led North German Confederation and build a strong German Empire. The Germans had superiority of numbers, since, true to Bismarck's hopes, the South German states (Bavaria, Wurttemberg, and Baden) regarded France as the aggressor in the conflict and had thus sided with Prussia. An equally important asset was the Prussian army's general staff, which planned the rapid, orderly movement of large numbers of troops to the battle zones. This superior organization and mobility enabled the chief of the general staff, General Helmuth von Moltke, to exploit German superiority in numbers in most of the war's battles.
The efficient German mobilization contrasted with confusion and delay on the French side. Germany was able to deliver 380,000 troops to the forward zone within 18 days of the start (July 14) of mobilization, while many French units reached the front either late or with inadequate supplies. The vast German and French armies that then confronted each other were each grouped into right and left wings. After suffering a check at the Battle of Wörth on Aug. 6, 1870, the commander of the French right (south) wing, Marshal Patrice Mac-Mahon, retreated westward. That same day, about 40 miles (65 km) to the northeast, the commander of the French left wing, Marshal Achille Bazaine, was dislodged from near Saarbrücken and fell back westward to the fortress of Metz. His further retreat was checked by the German right wing in two blundering battles on August 16 and 18, respectively (see Mars-la-Tour and Gravelotte, Battles of), and he then took refuge behind the defenses of Metz indefinitely.
The French right wing, commanded by Mac-Mahon and accompanied by Napoleon himself, attempted to relieve Bazaine but was itself surrounded and trapped by the Germans in a disastrous battle at Sedan (see Sedan, Battle of) on August 31. On September 2, 83,000 encircled French troops, with Napoleon and Mac-Mahon, surrendered. Since Bazaine's army was still bottled up in Metz, the result of the war was virtually decided by this surrender.
French resistance was carried on against desperate odds by a new government of national defense, which assumed power in Paris on Sept. 4, 1870, and proclaimed the deposition of the emperor and the establishment of the Third Republic. On September 19 the Germans began to besiege Paris. Jules Favre, foreign minister in the new government, went to negotiate with Bismarck, but the negotiations were broken off when he found that Germany demanded Alsace and Lorraine. Léon Gambetta, the leading figure in the provisional government, organized new French armies in the countryside after escaping from besieged Paris in a balloon. These engaged but could not defeat the German forces. Bazaine capitulated at Metz with his 140,000 troops intact on October 27, and Paris surrendered on Jan. 28, 1871.
The armistice of January 28 included a provision for the election of a French National Assembly, which would have the authority to conclude a definite peace. This settlement was finally negotiated by Adolphe Thiers and Favre and was signed February 26 and ratified March 1. Between then and the conclusion of the formal Treaty of Frankfurt on May 10, 1871, the republican government was threatened by an insurrection in Paris, in which radicals established their own short-lived government, the Paris Commune. The Commune was suppressed after two months, and the harsh provisions of the Treaty of Frankfurt were then implemented: Germany annexed Alsace and half of Lorraine, with Metz. Furthermore, France had to pay an indemnity of 5 billion francs and cover the costs of the German occupation of France's northern provinces until the indemnity was paid. The culminating triumph of Bismarck's plans came on Jan. 18, 1871, when King William I of Prussia was proclaimed German emperor at Versailles, the former palace of the kings of France.
The Franco-German War had far-reaching consequences. It established both the German Empire and the French Third Republic. With Napoleon III no longer in power to protect them, the Papal States were annexed by Italy (Sept. 20, 1870), thereby completing that nation's unification. The Germans' crushing victory over France in the war consolidated their faith in Prussian militarism, which would remain a dominant force in German society until 1945. (Additionally, the Prussian system of conscript armies controlled by a highly trained general staff was soon adopted by the other great powers.) Most importantly, Germany's annexation of Alsace-Lorraine aroused a deep longing for revenge in the French people. The years from 1871 to 1914 were marked by an extremely unstable peace, since France's determination to recover Alsace-Lorraine and Germany's mounting imperialist ambitions kept the two nations constantly poised for conflict. Their mutual animosity proved to be the driving force behind the prolonged slaughter on the Western Front in World War I.]

Tuesday 19

Received letters from Louie who is comfortably settled in lodgings at Withernsea. Mrs Rollings and Mrs (?) Jones called, Mrs R brought Mattie two beautiful brooches from Italy.

Wednesday 20

Julia returned home from Greenwich. Allan Holroyd Ayrton and Effie went to the theatre. Julia gave her ticket to Ayrton.

[At this point a press cutting about the war:
PROCLAMATION OF THE EMPEROR NAPOLEON TO THE FRENCH PEOPLE. Paris, July 23.
The emperor has addressed the following proclamation to the French people:
"Frenchmen, -- there are solemn moments in the life of peoples when the national honour, violently excited, imposes itself with irresistible force, dominates all interests, and alone takes in hand the direction of the destinies of the country. One of those decisive hours has sounded for France. Prussia, to whom, both during and since the war of 1866, we have shown the most conciliatory disposition, has taken no account of our good wishes and our forbearance. Launched on the path of invasion, she has aroused defiance, everywhere necessitated exaggerated armaments, and has turned Europe into a camp, where nothing but uncertainty and fear of the morrow reigns. A last incident has come to show the instability of international relations, and to prove the gravity of the situation. In presence of the new pretensions of Prussia we made our protestations to be heard. They were evaded, and were followed on the part of Prussia by contemptuous proceedings. Our country has resented this with profound irritation, and immediately a cry for war resounded from one end of France to the other. It only remains for us to confide our destinies to the decision of arms. We do not make war on Germany, whose independence we respect. Let us wish that the peoples who compose the great German nationality may freely dispose of their destinies. For ourselves we demand the establishment of a state of affairs which shall guarantee our security and assure our future. We wish to conquer a lasting peace based on the true interest of peoples, and to put an end to the precarious state in which all nations employ their resources to arm themselves one against the other. The glorious flag which we once more unfurl before those who have provoked us is the same which bore throughout Europe the civilising ideas of our great revolution. It represents the same principles, and inspires the same devotion. Frenchmen, I place myself at the head of that valiant army which is animated by love of duty and of country. It knows its own worth, since it has seen how victory has accompanied its march in the four quarters of the world. I shall take my son with me, despite his youth. He knows what are the duties which his name imposes upon him, and he is proud to bear a share in the dangers of those who fight for their country. May God bless our efforts. A great people which defends a just cause is invincible. "Napoleon."]

Thursday 21

Went out with Effie. Miss Dardis called. Maud came in the evening.

[Press cutting about the war:
PRUSSIAN REPLY TO THE DUKE DE GRAMONT’S CIRCULAR. Berlin, July 22, Evening.
The following statement has been published:
"In reference to a circular of the Duke de Gramont, published yesterday, and of which a telegraphic summary has been received here, alleging that the Chancellor of the North German Confederation has declared the candidature of the Prince of Hohenzollern to be impossible, and that the Under-Secretary of State, Baron Thile, has pledged his word that such a candidature did not exist, both the Chancellor and the Secretary declare officially and in their private capacity that not a single word on the subject has ever passed between either of them and M. Benedetti, either officially or in private conversation, since they were first aware of the fact that the offer of the Spanish Crown had been made to the Prince of Hohenzollern."

REPULSE OF PRUSSIAN TROOPS. Forbach, July 24
The Prussian troops yesterday advanced as far as Carling, but were vigorously attacked and repulsed by French foot Chasseurs. At the same time a regiment of mounted Chasseurs made a reconnaissance on Prussian territory. The Prussians appear to be assuming the offensive.

THE ATTITUDE OF RUSSIA. St. Petersburg, July 24
The Official Journal of today contains the following: "The Imperial Russian Government has made all possible endeavours to avert the outbreak of war. Unfortunately the rapidity with which the warlike resolutions were taken rendered our efforts for the maintenance of peace abortive. The Emperor is resolved to observe neutrality, so long as Russia's interests are not affected by the eventualities of the campaign. The Russian Government undertakes to support every endeavour to circumscribe the operations and diminish the duration of the war."

THE NEUTRALITY OF ITALY. Florence, July 23
The Official Gazette of this evening announces that the Italian Government has received notification that war is declared between France and the North German Confederation, Bavaria, Wurtemburg, Baden and Hesse. The Gazette recalls the obligations of strict neutrality which are incumbent upon Italian subjects, and the penalties incurred by any infraction of the laws.]


Friday 22

Went to Wimbledon with Effie. Saw the Commissioner Holroyd. Miss H [Sarah Holroyd] very bowed in her spine for her age (about 70). Drank tea with the Pynes. Agnes there.

[Commissioner Holroyd was Edward Holroyd, born 24th July, 1794, died 29th January, 1881. He was a barrister, and was subsequently appointed Senior Commissioner of the Bankruptcy Court in London. He had six children, of whom Edward Dundas Holroyd, Q.C., who emigrated to Melbourne, and became a Judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria, was one. For more about the Holroyds see Holroyd Family_booklet.doc, by Edward’s brother Thomas].

[Press cutting: Strasburg July 22. “The Prussians blew up the abutment on the Baden shore of the bridge at Kehl at 4 am today. The explosion was terrific. The bridge turrets were destroyed, and the debris thrown as far as the French shore.”]

Saturday 23

Called on Agnes found her sadly excited about her misunderstanding with Mrs G, tried in vain to persuade her that Julia was not the cause of it. George Smith of Tonbridge called.

Monday 25

Holroyd and Effie went early to Royal Academy. Julia went to see Mrs Rollings who kindly gave her some coral ornaments. Went shopping with J. in the evening. Letter from Louie. She speaks with much resignation of John's departure to Prussia as correspondent to the "Daily News."

[For an account of some of J E H S’s activities in Prussia and Paris see ‘RECOLLECTIONS of MR. SKINNER By ARCHIBALD FORBES, in Family Tree file at John Edwin Hilary Skinner – Notes.]

Tuesday 26

Effie and Holroyd dined with Acton

Wednesday 27

Effie left for Devonshire to reside previous to her marriage. Ellen Taylor.

Thursday 28

Ellen Taylor and baby and Mrs J. -- Miss Adshead - came to early dinner. A baby show -- the little Ursula contemplative and quiet. Then J. lively as a monkey, not still an instant. Allan in the evening.

Friday 29

Emma and Agnes came to early dinner -- little Julia very poorly.

Saturday 30

Ayrton left for Cornwall. Edith too poorly to go with him. Julia left for Macclesfield, Edward the same.

August

Monday 1

Edith and baby left at half to 5 a.m. for Mrs Pyne’s Gun?er’s Grove, Somerset, passed the day in "putting to rights." Allan dined here, read the clever political squib Jinx’s(?) baby.

[‘Squib’ - a short satirical composition – Early 16th Century]
[The Pynes came from Somerset and Henry Pyne was evidently wealthy - it seems that, like Allan Maclean Skinner, he had a house in the West Country as well as in London.]

Wednesday 3

Called on Maud whom I missed, as she came here. Then on to Greenwich, saw Emma and little Julia who looked ill but better, and returned home at ten o'clock, read "Esmond." Thackeray is a clever imitator of Fielding’ - wants the originality of genius so eminently seen in Dickens works and in Miss Evans "George Eliot."

Thursday 4

Louie and Cleve returned from Withernsea, boat detained in the Thames by fog. Agnes and Miss Spurling(?) called. Maud also. Engagement at Saarbruck between French and Prussians, the former attacking. Prussians defeated.

Friday 5

Louie and I alone at dinner.

[Louie and John evidently had a house in London (see entry for 9 June), but Louie is probably MAC’s most frequent visitor – especially now that John is away reporting on the war?]


Saturday 6

Allan and Holroyd here. Rumours of a great battle being fought between Prussians and French

Sunday 7

Rumours of great Prussian victory and 4000 prisoners taken by them.

Monday 8

The great victory confirmed. Rout of French army and death of Mac-Mahon.
[From Encyclopaedia Brittanica (Sept. 1, 1870), decisive defeat of the French army in the Franco-German War, which led to the fall of the Second French Empire; it was fought at the French border fortress of Sedan on the Meuse River, between 120,000 French troops under Marshal Mac-Mahon and more than 200,000 German troops under General Helmuth von Moltke.
Mac-Mahon had intended to march his army, accompanied by Napoleon III, from Châlons-sur-Marne northeast toward Metz, to relieve the French Army of the Rhine, which was trapped at Metz. Moltke learned of Mac-Mahon's movements through newspaper reports and rapidly moved the newly formed Army of the Meuse, under Crown Prince Albert of Saxony, north to intercept Mac-Mahon. In three small engagements on the Meuse River (August 29 to 31), the Germans forced Mac-Mahon to fall back to the fortress at Sedan. While Mac-Mahon tried to consider whether to try again to smash through eastward toward Metz or instead to retreat west to Paris, Moltke moved up the 3rd Prussian Army, under Crown Prince Frederick William, to complete the encirclement of Sedan.
The wounding of Mac-Mahon early on September 1 caused extreme confusion in the French command, allowing the Germans to carry on their encirclement without serious opposition. Thereafter, the desperate French efforts to break out, including massive cavalry charges, led to nothing but high casualties. After the German artillery had pounded the French position in an all-day bombardment, the Germans launched their main attack in the afternoon. Emperor Napoleon III realized that the position was hopeless. He surrendered, and the next morning he and 83,000 French soldiers became prisoners of war. The French had lost 3,000 men killed, 14,000 wounded, and 21,000 missing or captured. German losses totaled 9,000 men killed and wounded. As the victorious Germans marched toward Paris, a popular uprising there on September 4 toppled the government of the Second Empire and set up a provisional republican government.]

Saturday 13

Left London by steamer for Plymouth with Holroyd Louie and Cleve -- weather fine.

Sunday 14

On board steamer, arrived at Plymouth about 12 midnight.

Monday 15

Landed at Plymouth, booked our luggage. Holroyd left us to buy a bridal bouquet for Effie. We went on the Hoe and I took Cleve to see the fort here. We met Holroyd and then joined Louie. We dined at a Pastrycook’s -- Holroyd went to Newton Abbot: by afternoon train - Louis Cleve and I went to Newton, met Mr Skinner. Went to the Globe Hotel where Holroyd and Allan joined us -- presently came in Kate then Mattie.

Tuesday 16

On this day I nerved myself to part with my dear son whose quiet sincere affection I have enjoyed for thirty years with but little interruption, but I resign him cheerfully in the hope that his happiness may be much increased as mine will be diminished by the daily loss of his society -- may his married life be happy! Left Newton with a heavy heart for Looe, much comforted by the love of Matty and Cleve with me.

[So it seems possible that Holroyd Chaplin and Effie Skinner were married at Bickington or Newton Abbott. Have added this provisionally to the Family Tree.]


Wednesday 17

At Looe. Edith and Ayrton not at home and the place consequently dreary. A most unpleasant position, to be in the hands of inefficient servants without power to govern and order.

Thursday 18

At Looe. Louie arrived from Newton.

Friday 19

Louie bathed in the sea

Saturday 20

Ayrton came home with Edith and baby who was very poorly and alarmed us by getting daily worse.

Monday 22

All very busy preparing for the bazaar which not one of us did with a very good will as we were thinking more of baby. Deadining all day, this stupid indirect way of giving money.

Friday 26

Louie left Looe. Baby improving in health.

Monday 29

Great preparations for bazaar, dear baby better. Agnes arrived in the evening, also de Lacy Hughes

Tuesday 30

Tents pitched in the garden and this absurd game of selling commenced

Wednesday 31

Continued today.

September

Thursday 1

We all rejoiced that the affair was over. The whole place looked like a tea garden. In the morning we were glad to see men clearing away tents etc.

Saturday 3

Agnes left us. Mattie bathed Cleve

Monday 5

Cleve very happy riding on a donkey

Thursday 8

I left Looe to visit Mrs Skinner at Bickington, South Devon

[Bickington is just off the A38, near Newton Abbott]

Sat 10

Went with Kate to Hayter -- day lovely air exhilarating and view from that Tor surpassing beautiful - how I enjoyed that drive in the cart going slowly on like a loitering walk all the way, giving one time to enjoy the lovely scenery.

Monday 12

I left Newton to join Mattie and Cleve at Plymouth station, sent Mattie to Bickington, took Cleve to have some dinner and then at his particular desire to the fort -- had tea in the town, then went on board.

Tuesday 13

Slept well on board, no sickness. The dear child happy all day and entertaining everyone by his lively imagination and knowledge of the positions of the contending armies and his anxiety about the contents of the newspaper which I got at Southampton. Fine views along Havant. (?) a thousand casks of butter at Southampton

Wednesday 14

Arrived at B. Square at 5 in the afternoon. Holroyd and Effie had already arrived.

Thursday 15

Going about with Effie this day after furniture.

Wednesday 28

This evening Louie and I took that good little woman Mrs Shine to Euston station – L. in the cab with her, I walked with the two children, eight with them were comfortably placed in a second class carriage. An intelligent printer kindly promised to assist her on her journey towards Chicago.

Thursday 29

Holroyd and Effie left me – alas! and then Mattie and I dined at Mrs Rolling’s and Mrs Williams’s.

Friday 30

We all met at Holroyd's house and had a pleasant evening there -- enjoyed it more than a formal spread.


October

Saturday 1

Allan came to stay with me. The halfpenny stamps for newspapers and message cards introduced this day -- read several advertisements in that form. Went with Mattie to King's Cross Station -- how I wished I could have gone with her to Edinburgh.

Sunday 2

An excellent sermon on the war from Llewellyn Davies

Monday 3

Went to Adelaide Road to take Louie's two letters from John. Dear Cleve performed his exercises. In the afternoon walked with Effie.

Tuesday 4

Went to the Euston Rd with Effie to look for cheap furniture. Louie came to tea and stayed to dinner. "Each child that is born has a little kingdom of thought of his own which it is a sin in us to invade" Thackeray, “Virginians.” We only make hypocrites of them by commanding them over much.

Thursday 6

Went with Effie to look for furniture.

Friday 7

Called on Mrs Nelson, met Margaret Nugent there -- also on the Evegards - Mr F. Evegard obliged to have 4 soldiers in his house which he leaves in charge of his servant, he left also a good collection of articles vertu. Went with Effie out at Holroyd’s in the evening. Louie came in the morning.

[MAC’s eldest daughter was Julia Margaret Nugent Chaplin (born 1837), and according to the Chaplin & Skinner family book she married James Edward Nugent (born 1833) in 1886, and had a daughter Margaret Nugent. All a bit late for an 1870 diary! Could the marriage date be incorrect? It seems very unlikely that she married in 1886 at 49 years of age and then went on to have four children! A marriage date of 1856 would be more likely, and a 5 could be read by the printer as an 8. But in the MAC diaries 1870 to 1873 there is no obvious mention of James Edward Nugent, and Julia seems almost to live at her mother’s house. A bit of a mystery, but perhaps the Edward below is not MAC’s brother, but Julia’s husband?]

Saturday 8

Received letters from Julia and Edward the former with (?), the latter asking me to enquire about a French nurse -- on doing so, heard very sad stories of the hardships the French refugees are enduring, many of good position in want of a house. In the afternoon Louie and Cleve came, both slept here.

Sunday 9

Elizabeth Boulton our cook for three years married to Henry Hinton.

Monday 10

Went with Effie to hear the inaugural address on the opening of the Female Medical Society for this term. Mrs Needham delivered it, Doctor Ross in the chair. Doctor Dugsdale and Doctor Edmonds spoke. Called on Mrs Williams and Mrs Rollings in Weymouth Street then on Margaret Nugent at Mrs Nelson's.

Tuesday 11

Went to Effie's -- using the sewing machine. Louie and Cleve came.

Friday 14

Allan dined with Holroyd

Saturday 15

Allan left for his duties at Hythe. Louie came. Edward Emma and little Julia called, all well.

Sunday 16

Collection at Christ Church for destitute French. Holroyd and Effie dined here. Louie and Cleve here.

Monday 17

Went to see Mrs Whichcote, met there Mme de (?) who when last I saw her almost 40 years ago was Miss (?), daughter of the Marylebone police magistrate. They had left Paris on account of the siege. Called at Putney on Miss Harcourt Slade – liked her -- saw Mrs Henry -- then to Kensington, saw both Miss Shurrs looking wonderfully well, Louisa at 78 quite young and her sister at 94 bright and active. Dined with Holroyd and Effie.

Tuesday 18

The German army going up and down France ad libitum. (?) post regularly established; and supplies regular. The only communication between Paris and the exterior by balloons. Those in camp must suffer from the heavy rains now.

Wednesday 19

Holroyd came here to dinner. I went to see Louie.

Thursday 20

Louie came with Cleve. She went to see Florrie at Ashley house. She and Cleve slept here. Holroyd came in the evening.

Friday 21

I went with Cleve to Adelaide Road, after lunch called on Florrie. She is scarcely able to walk. Saw Ottie, Henry and May, went with them also Louie Cleve and Miss Skinner to the station for Brighton. All looked as if requiring sea air. Louie and Cleve returned to Adelaide Road.


November

Tuesday 1

Cleve came here with mumps.

Friday 11

Allan came this evening looking very well -- the stupidity of some military and other men is incredible -- one amusement in camp is throwing missiles through a closed window.

Saturday 12

Julia returned from Croyde. I called on Holroyd. Allan went to Brighton to see Florance and her children and returned in the evening.

Tuesday 15

Louie started with Cleve at 7.40 am for Germany Carlsruhe via Ostend and Brussels. He is five years old with a fine intellect. I hope his mind will not be overweighed as it is so receptive. How his little spirit pervades the house. His pretty litter of toys everywhere makes him present to me. I am glad he is with his mother to cheer and delight her heart.

Wednesday 16

Same day - Ellen Taylor called with her husband. She looked ill. May the prescribed treatment effect her restoration to health! Youth may prevail but I fear doctors can't do much for her.

Friday 18

Received a letter from Louie posted at Bonn and written in the train en route from Brussels

Monday 21

Great fear of war with Russia for breaking the treaty regarding the Black Sea fleet. Called on Mrs Rollings and Mrs Witham. Wrote to Ayrton.

Tuesday 22

Letter from J E H S. Morning very rainy, afternoon fine, wind SW fresh. Went to see Effie. Julia to Charing X to get maps for J E H S. Letter from Louie in the evening telling of her being settled in the family of German schoolmaster at Carlsruhe.

Wednesday 23

Madame Celli dined here. Henri C and Ed Cole came to tea. Received letter from Allan. Wrote to Mattie and Louie. Effie called.

Thursday 24

Julia went to Highgate. I went to Effie's.

Friday 25

Engaged canvassing for Miss Garrett to be placed on the School Board. Called on Georgina, saw Jose and dear little girl.

Saturday 26

Engaged canvassing again, promise of success. Agnes called from Greenwich. Allan Holroyd and Effie called. The Miss Robbins’s came to tea. Letter from Louie -- she and Cleve very well.

Tuesday 29

Voted for Miss Garrett (a plumper) to be a member of the London School Board. Went to Brighton, called on Miss Dixon -- then after losing my way amongst the new buildings, to Florrie, found Miss Skinner there. The children charming in manner and lovely in aspect. Enjoyed a walk on the parade, saddened however by poor F’s helpless condition.
[According to the Shorter Oxford Dictionary, ‘plumper’ means “A vote cast at an election for a single candidate instead of an optional two or more.” and was first used in late 18th Century.]


Wednesday 30

At Brighton. Miss Drury the governess exerting a high church superstitious influence over the children who say prayers reverently and so it (?) by Maud and their mother they will however be influenced happily. Miss Garrett returned with 27,000 votes.


December

Thursday 1

At Brighton. The governess adopted by an aunt and sailor uncle who will exert a wholesome influence on her.

Friday 2

Returned to London with Florry Maud and the children, Ottie Henry and May -- baby Lilian at Cropthorne with her wet nurse. Went to Ashley House hoping to see Henry but he did not come in.

Sunday 4

Ottie, Henry, May dined with Maud - went to the zoological gardens with them. May terribly afraid of the lion, could not look at him after the first glance -- he looked fierce as it was feeding time. Florrie Miss S. Holroyd and Effie dined here.

Monday 12

Agnes came with Charles Hicks to announce her engagement to him. Emma and little Julia came with her.

[Edward, Emma’s husband, was uncle to Agnes.]

Saturday 24

Mattie came from Edinburgh at 5 a.m., looking well

Sunday 25

Edward, Emma, Holroyd, Allan, Effie here.

Thursday 29

Edward Grenfell died at Bagley(?)


END

[It seems that sometime in February the following year, 1871, MAC put her furniture in storage and was without a house for one year and nine months – see diary entry for 18 October 1872. Why?]


Diary, 1872

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1872. In this year she became 59, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 16 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

[From October, MAC was living at 60 Westbourne Pk Rd, Julia at 130 Queen’s Rd, Will and Mattie in E India Rd, Louie and John at 60 Alexander Street.]

January

Monday 1

At Looe with Julia, Mattie and Will [who] left on the 31st December. Little Ursula two years old, intelligent, speaks quite plainly. Miss James with us -- we all except Julia, who was poorly, dined at Mr Bishops. Holroyd and Effie in London. Allan and Maud at 15 Osborne Villas, Cliftonville, Brighton.

[MAC with her oldest and youngest children, Julia (35) and Matilda (26), and her brother’s son William Ayrton (25), who had just married Matilda, were all staying with MAC’s second son Ayrton (30), who was then Rector of Looe. Little Ursula was Ayrton’s 3 yr old daughter, known as Ulla, who became a doctor, and whose niece Ursula Gregory (also a doctor), I knew at Bassetts in Little Baddow in 1947 as ‘Cousin Ursula’ when she was 51 and I was 17. Holroyd (32) was MAC’s oldest son and Effie (née Skinner) his wife. Allan (28) was her third son and Maud (née Skinner) his wife.]

Wednesday 3

Dined early at Mr Coles

Friday 5

Julia and Miss James left Looe, the former for London, the latter for Brighton.

[Very likely Mary Ann James]

Sunday 7

Went to church in the morning. Ayrton did not preach – intensely wet in the afternoon -- decided to leave next day as Will had to go to India on Thursday.

[William Ayrton worked in India for five years from 1867 according to his obituary. After they married and he returned to India Matilda studied in France. See 11 January and FTM-Chaplin, Matilda-Notes]

Monday 8

Left Looe at 8 a.m. for Exeter, thence to Barnstaple where I went in a trap to Croyde to see Mrs Skinner -- found her pretty well looking charmingly for her age in a woolly cloud of mauve and white. A lovely view from the house, with an island in the distance. Carry only at home of all that once large family circle -- she just recovered from (?). Mrs S. talking about her aunt just deceased -- saw the miniature of Mrs Savage her grandmother - very like Kate and Florrie, cameo of Lady Charlemont her mother's half brother.

[Three of MAC’s children (Louisa, Holroyd, Allan) had married three children of Alan Maclean Skinner and his wife Caroline Emily (60) (viz: John, Effie, Maud). Caroline was only about the same age as MAC herself. But she was an invalid, looked after by her daughter Caroline (32). They lived at Croyde, in Bideford Bay. So where was her husband Allan Maclean Skinner living? In London or Staffordshire? He was still a Judge, but resigned in September 1872. Kate and Florrie (Florance) were two of their daughters. Mrs Savage is a puzzle: Mrs Skinner’s grandmothers were Frances Harding née Probyn and ? Willoughby, née ? It wouldn’t be appropriate to use ‘Mrs’ in front of a maiden name. Could it have been her great-grandmother? But if her mother had a half-brother her mother’s mother might have been Mrs Savage for part of her life – that would explain it. But how could her mother’s half-brother be called Lady Charlemont? I shall assume half-sister!]

Tuesday 9

Left Croyde at 5.30 p.m., slept at Exeter, came on to London next day (10th), arrived in the afternoon at 34 Manchester square where Mattie and Will were living. Will arrived in the evening from Bexhill, left Edward much better.

[MAC’s daughter Matilda and her husband William Ayrton. William’s father Edward was Edward Nugent Ayrton, MAC’s brother, who died in November 1873]

Thursday 11

Will and Mattie left Manchester Square at 7 a.m.. She remained in Paris to study -- he went on to India. Called on Louie -- saw Miss Sullivan. Cleve affectionate and gentle as ever. Heard of Maud's illness.

[Cleve was John Allan Cleveland Skinner (7), son of MAC’s daughter Louisa. Who was Miss Sullivan?]

Friday 12

Decided to go to Brighton, arrived there are at 9 p.m., found Maud very ill -- both seemed glad to see me.

[Maud was MAC’s daughter in law. ‘Both’ very likely implies her son Allan]

Saturday 13

Walked alone. The air pleasant but very damp.

Sunday 14

Did not go to church. Maud better but very ill in bed.

Monday 15

Maud better

Tuesday 16

Letter from Will from Brindisi

Wednesday 17

Weather damp, much rain all this week.

Thursday 18

Maud much better and up for the first time. Allan carried her to the sofa. Allan and I walked out for biscuits.

Saturday 20

Returned to London at midday. John and Louie dined here.

[MAC’s daughter Louisa and her husband John Edwin Hilary Skinner, war correspondent]

Sunday 21

Went to church at (?). Wet afternoon. Met Harriet Henvey there. She looks pale, the climate of India appears to have told upon her.

[Harriet Henvey née Pyne who seems to have been an unhappy person. Her sister Edith Pyne married MAC’s son Ayrton Chaplin]

Tuesday 23

Wrote to Edward, to Mrs Wallace, to Emma on her mother's death. Went to Mrs Pyne’s in the afternoon, saw there the three children of Mrs Henvey, two of Mrs E Grenfell’s one of Mrs J. Grenfell’s, the latter interested me the most. Nelly Taylor was there, the most engaging child of the party. Called at Louie’s after dinner -- saw Cleve. Letters from Mattie and Allan and Mrs Rawlings.

[Edward was MAC’s brother Edward Nugent Ayrton. Emma née Althof was his German wife. The three children of Mrs Harriet Henvey née Pyne at that time were William (5), Margaret (4) and Frederick (2). The wives of the Grenfell brothers, Edward and John, were née Alice Pyne (29) and Sophia Pyne (28), sisters of Harriet and Edith. The child that interested MAC most was Bernard Pyne Grenfell (3) who later became Professor of Papyrology at Queen's College Oxford. Who was Mrs Wallace?]

Wednesday 24

Wrote to Allan and Ayrton, called on Mrs Evegard and brought Cleve home. Weather persistently wet. Read the Tichbourne case -- the Reverend Watson who killed his wife in perhaps an attack of delirium -- was reprieved on account of previous good conduct – I should (?) preferred the former reason but it is a good augury for doing away with capital punishment. Many a one has been hanged whose previous character was good.

[Allan and Ayrton two of MAC’s sons, Cleve was her daughter Louisa’s son – who was Mrs Evegard?]

Thursday 25

Came to 5 York Street in partnership with Louie and John. Julia and Cleve with us. Ayrton came late at night unexpectedly as we had not received his telegram.

[What does the first sentence mean? Did MAC live there, share it with them? See 31 May.]

Friday 26

Went to Highgate. Ellen much the same. Little Nellie well and very playful, returned home in the evening.

Saturday 27

Walked with Cleve in the morning -- in the afternoon took him to Effie's and to Mr Celli’s then to Kensington Gardens Square to fetch our things. Cleve very much admired by Lady Rowley and a Russian gentleman. Letter from Emma.

[MAC was very fond of Louisa’s son John Allan Cleveland Skinner and often looked after him. Effie née Skinner was the wife of her eldest son Holroyd. Mr Celli probably French, mentioned frequently in the diaries. It seems that MAC’s house was in Kensington Gardens Square?]

Sunday 28

Went to hear Mr Davies. A good sermon on the creation, the Book of Genesis being the lesson for the day. Man's nature to investigate the beginning of things - also on the (?) of the whole world.

Monday 29

Day wet and gloomy as it has been for some weeks. Julia took Cleve to Highgate. Allan called: just returned from Brighton. Went with him to 34 Manchester Square to see Maud. Holroyd, Effie and Miss Skinner dined here. Letter from Henry Hinton, he is doing well.

[A press cutting here: The city of Schamachi, in the Caucasus, was yesterday totally destroyed by a succession of earthquakes. Few houses remain standing, and many lives have been lost.]
[Maud Chaplin née Skinner had only been married to Allan Chaplin for a month. Could 34 Manchester Sq have been the London home of her father Allan Maclean Skinner? But see also Ashley House! William Ayrton and his new wife Matilda were also living there briefly at this time, but from the entry above it seems that it was not MAC’s house. Miss Skinner may have been Marianne Skinner (71), sister of Allan Maclean Skinner. Henry Hinton had married Elizabeth Boulton, MAC’s cook, in 1870.]

Tuesday 30

Maud and Allan dined with us. Cleve waited on us, called himself "the tiny waiter" and enjoyed his new calling.

Wednesday 31

Went to Kent Terrace to see Edith and Ursula with Julia and Cleve, called on Hugh Smith’s. Cleve went out with children. Wrote to Mattie, Mrs Skinner, H Hinton.

[Edith née Pyne (27), wife of MAC’s second son, Ayrton, and Ursula (3) her daughter. Who were Hugh Smith, H Hinton?]

February

Thursday 1

Mrs Nelson and Pauline called here. Mrs and Miss Russell Skinner called. Holroyd and Effie, Edward Feild and Josephine. Wrote to Will. Cleve at home with cough.

[There were several Russell Skinners and Russell Morland Skinners. Who were Mrs Nelson and Pauline? Edward Feild was a son of MAC’s husband’s sister Ann.]

Friday 2

Edith with Ursula came to lunch here -- little Nellie Taylor with Mary Adshead -- Children of two years old with as varied character as they will have through life. Maud and Allan came to dinner.

[Little Nellie Taylor was daughter of John Taylor and Ellen née Feild, daughter of Ann née Chaplin. Mary Adshead married John Taylor after Ellen’s death]

Saturday 3

Received box from Henry Hinton. Called on Florance at Ashley house, May with her, looking very pretty. Then on to Miss Shurr who looked amiable and cheerful in manner at 94 years old. Expressed much pleasure at Cleve's visit -- his brightness had delighted her as much as his beauty.

[Florance Steward née Skinner, sister of MAC’s daughters-in-law, and Florance May (6) her daughter, who became a nun. Where was Ashley House, and was it the home of the Steward family or of Allan Maclean Skinner? Miss Shurr (or her younger sister 14 years her junior, see 22 July) had taught MAC in 1821, when MAC was 13 years old.]

Sunday 4

Went to Christchurch, in the afternoon called: Edward and Charlie, Maud and Allan, Miss Skinner, Florance and May -- and Acton -- and Holroyd and Effie.

[Miss Skinner was probably Marianne Skinner, sister of Allan Maclean Skinner, who died at 5 Ashley Place in 1885. Ashley Place is near the RC Cathedral, Victoria Street. Could 5 Ashley Street be Ashley House? Charlie Celli was a friend of MAC’s brother Edward. He was possibly French. Edward had a German wife, had travelled ‘systematically’ in Europe, was a linguist and an enthusiast for decimal coinage.]

Monday 5

Dined at Holroyd's with Edith and Ayrton who had just come from Looe.

Tuesday 6

Called on Mrs Whichcote. Ayrton went to Stow Upland. Went with Maud Allan and Louie to the Court Theatre, saw a pretty little piece on the first part of Nicholas Nickleby, Miss Squeers and Tilda Price very well played (?) good comedy.

[MAC’s son Ayrton was moving from being Rector of Looe to become Vicar of Stow Upland in Suffolk. Who was Mrs Whichcote?]

Wednesday 7

Florance, Carry, Mr and Mrs Acton came in the evening. Florance singing delightfully.

[Who were Mr and Mrs Acton? One of MAC’s sons was called Acton Smee Ayrton. Smee was the married name of MAC’s mother’s half-sister. Acton Chaplin of Aylesbury was a brother of a Miss Chaplin of Devonshire who MAC’s mother knew at school, he provided his name to Acton Smee Ayrton and also became his godfather.]

Friday 9

Edith went to Stow Upland with Ursula

Saturday 10

I took Cleve and May to the Kensington Museum -- both much pleased, Cleve explaining things to May had behind him three or four less instructed than himself, listening earnestly and amused.

[Florance May Steward, who became a nun, would have been about 6 years old at this time, and John Alan Cleveland Skinner was about 7 years old]

Sunday 11

Went to Christchurch. Allan and Maud dined here.

Monday 12

Dined with Holroyd. Florance returned to Cropthorne.

Tuesday 13

Effie dined here. Holroyd at "The Lemon(?)"

Wednesday 14

Holroyd dined here, Effie at the Carrs’. John Taylor brought Ellen and the child in a carriage with Mary Adshead.

[John Taylor was the husband of Ellen née Feild, whose mother Ann (née Chaplin) was a sister of MAC’s husband John Clarke Chaplin]

Friday 16

Called on Effie. Wrote to Frederick, sent him copy of Louie's memorandum of Emma's attack of illness.

[Frederick Ayrton, one of MAC’s brothers, was sent a note on his sister-in-law’s illness]

Saturday 17

Fetched my watch from Bracebridge. Called on Mrs Henvey and Mrs Nelson. Wrote to Mattie and Ayrton.

[Mrs Henvey, wife of Frederick Henvey, was born Harriett Pyne. Mrs Nelson was perhaps not a relation.]

Thursday 22

Mme Celli dined with us.

Saturday 24

I dined at Holroyd's. Acton called to offer tickets for St. Pauls (Thanksgiving Service).

Sunday 25

Called on Mrs Nelson

Monday 26

Called on Mrs Nelson. Effie called. Holroyd called. Edward M Celli called, gave them tickets for the procession on the Holborn Viaduct. Maud dined with us.

Tuesday 27

Went to the Thanksgiving Service at St. Paul’s for the recovery of the Prince of Wales. A fine impressive affair, and apt to stir the spirit of a poet. All was well arranged within and without. We went fearing possible crowding, much earlier than necessary. Allan and Maud, Julia and I in the North Transept. Holroyd and Effie, John and Louie in the South Transept. Cleve saw the procession from Stanhope Gate Lodge.

[Press cutting describing the ceremony in St Paul’s is tucked into the page:
In December 1871 the heir to the throne, Edward Prince of Wales (Bertie), later King Edward VII, fell ill with typhoid fever, and for several days he was at the doors of death. On December 13th, on the eve of the anniversary of Prince Albert's death, everybody feared the worse, but on the 14th Bertie showed a light improvement and 24 hours later he showed clear signs of having overcome the illness.
On February 27 1872 a Thanksgiving service was held in St.Paul's Cathedral for Bertie's recovery. It was the first time since Prince Albert’s death ten years earlier that Queen Victoria had appeared in public. Both, the Queen and her heir were acclaimed by the crowd. The Prince's illness had helped to recover the Royal family's popularity, and now nobody thought about republicanism.]

Wednesday 28

Went in the afternoon with Julia Louie and Cleve to see the decorated streets and horses all along the route of the Prince and Queen to and from St. Paul’s -- a pretty floral decoration across Oxford Street by Mudie's Library. The grand arch at the bottom of Ludgate Hill pretty. Saw the Ellen Taylor husband and child near Temple Bar. Knocking at the knocker there seemed an announcement to all ages and classes. We observed them while waiting to pass on.

[Ellen Taylor, daughter of MAC’s husband’s sister Ann née Chaplin]

Thursday 29

Weather wet after bright weather during the festive days. Saltwells called. Walked out with Cleve, called on Maud.

March

Friday 1

Little Nellie Taylor came. I took her and Cleve to see Georgina -- Miss Adshead lunched here, reported Ellen not so well.

[Ellen Taylor, daughter of John Taylor and Ellen née Feild, daughter of Ann née Chaplin, sister of John Clarke Chaplin, father of MAC]

Saturday 2

Went to see Effie. Maud came to lunch. Letter from Ayrton telling me that the people at Looe had recognised his efforts to improve education there by presenting him with a silver salver.

[ Try the local library for information]

Friday 8

Jackson called and told me he had left Edward. Called on Mrs Law whose son is ill for which reason she is in London – saw the new neighbourhood of Redcliffe W Broughton.

[Who was Jackson, Mrs Law? Where is Redcliffe W Broughton?]

Sunday 10

Allan and Maud, Holroyd and Effie dined here. I heard Donald Fraser preach most eloquently at the Scotch Church. Acton called in the evening.

Monday 11

Received a letter from Frederick concerning Edward and Emma. Called on Holroyd in the evening.

Tuesday 12

Went with Allan and Maud to see ‘The last days of Pompeii’. My attention was so attracted by the display of scenery dress and decoration that I had not much to spare for the play and hardly saw the succeeding piece. Black Eyed Susan a most touching melodrama with much sweet writing in it, was well acted. This piece is full of real life and the hero was well done. Wrote to Frederick.

Wednesday 13

Went to Allan in the morning to help them. At 1/2 past 4pm they left for Southampton. What a difference it made to me in parting with him, that he was one with Maud, as I felt how she will while she lives love and cherish him and more than supply a mother's care and love -- how different it might have been had he been less good. They were to sleep at Southampton and M A Skinner to meet Maud and return to town with her.

[Allan on his way to India, his leave finished – he wrote from Burma in 1873. M A Skinner is a mystery - the only M A Skinner was born in 1770]

Thursday 14

A letter from Ayrton enclosing one from Mr Cole saying they were going to present him with a testimonial at Looe -- no parson there yet. Holroyd and Effie dined here. Parkes Willy too ill to come. Edward called. Maud returned from Southampton.

[Rev. Parkes Willy was the husband of Anna Cordelia Skinner, a daughter of Allan Maclean Skinner. Edward, MAC’s brother, must have got better, or a bit better]

Friday 15

Letter from Allan enclosing one to Edward and Mattie. Went to see Maud at Ashley House. Louie and Cleve went to Highgate to stay a week. Julia went to see Ellen, thought her weaker.

[MAC’s brother was Edward, his son William Edward being married to MAC’s daughter Mattie. William Edward was in Japan at this time, so perhaps the letter was for Will’s father and Will’s wife.]

Saturday 16

Maud came to lunch

Sunday 17

Went to St. Mary's Bryanston Square. Sermon for Girls’ School parson mentioned incidentally that haystacks stood on that spot 47 years ago. Acton called and Edward Feild.

[Edward Feild was John Clarke Chaplin’s nephew. So Bryanston Sq was still farmland in 1825]

Monday 18

Went to Highgate and took little Arthur Grenfell. Cleve(?) pleased to see us and met Arthur warmly calling him the "aged (?)" Ellen much the same and amused with watching the children. A young Viennese lady Miss Altman came from a school at Blackheath.

[Arthur Pascoe Grenfell died at Wells mental hospital and his cousin Bernard died in Perth mental hospital, yet both had good careers it seems. Ellen was very likely Ellen Feild, daughter of John Clarke Chaplin’s sister Ann and wife of John Taylor so no direct relation of MAC. ]

Tuesday 19

Went to Westminster and to Brompton to call on Nortons and Mrs Law who is in London for her son's health to consult doctors. Miss Altman better.

[None of these a relation I think.]

Wednesday 20

Went to “Charity Organisation Meeting.” Martineau’s speech stood out in relief from the matter of fact style of others. Miss Altman better. Lionel Macpherson befriends her and Mrs Pyne assists him.

[MAC’s son Ayrton’s wife was Edith née Pyne, and Mrs Pyne was probably her mother, Harriet née James, whose grandfather had been headmaster of Rugby]

Thursday 21

I went to Highgate, such a heavy cloud darkened the air that we were obliged to have candles at 12 o'clock then snow fell until it was three or four inches deep on the path -- but presently the sun shone and some went to London. Cleve and I went to Ellen. Returned with him at 7 when the snow was crisp and the moon bright: cold frosty night. The German lady left us.

[Who lived at Highgate? Perhaps Louie and John Edward Hilary Skinner, but see 13 July]

Friday 22

Louie returned to Highgate. More snow. I returned to London, wrote to Will.

Saturday 23

Snow all morning. Went out in afternoon, very wet thawing fast -- called on Mrs Nelson. Holroyd and Effie dined with us. Wrote to Mattie.

Sunday 24

Went to St. Mary's, heard Dr Jowell preach. Acton called also Edward Feild and C. Celli took a walk to Palace Gardens. Very cold.

Monday 25

Went to Highgate to see Louie and Cleve. Called on Mrs Knight -- did not see her but Miss Williams. Saw Ellen -- much the same. Returned at 7 p.m., very cold ground at Highgate covered with snow. Letter from Mattie and Will.

Tuesday 26

Cold. Julia went to Highgate. I went to Red Lion Street to get Julia's watch.

Wednesday 27

Holroyd and Effie came to breakfast. Went to Ashley house to see Florance who was in town for a short time.

Thursday 28

Louie returned from Highgate with Cleve. Rained the whole day.

Sunday 31st (Easter day)

At Christ Church

April

Monday 1

At 21 Westbourne Park Villas. Weather very wet. Professor Maurice died.

[Holroyd lived at 21 Westbourne Park Villas]

[Tucked into this page is a press cutting quoting a tribute paid to Professor Maurice as a man of peace, by Dean Stanley in a sermon at Westminster Abbey.]

[Another press cutting dated London, Monday, April 1, begins as follows:
"All Europe may well look this morning towards the little country of Holland and thank her for reminding Civilisation of the debt which is for ever due to her sturdy children.…….. three hundred years ago, Brill was taken by the "Beggars of the Sea;" and that same bold exploit was the real beginning of the long war in which, by desperate valour, by dogged endurance, and terrible sufferings, the Lowlanders at last wrested their freedom from Spain, and won a grand and complete victory for the Reformed Faith and for liberty of conscience. Men forget too easily; and, without wishing to perpetuate religious animosity, it is certain that Holland performs a duty to herself and to humanity in celebrating today the tercentenary of that gallant stroke, the capture of Brill.
Let us recall briefly the events of the critical time in question, that the least-informed may judge whether the Netherlanders are not fully warranted in making a grand commemoration of this occurrence. Philip II had succeeded Charles V as ruler of the Low Countries, which were at the period in question more valuable to Spain than Italy, Mexico, or Peru. Bigoted in faith, bitter in heart, hateful in disposition, cruel beyond all monarchs, the Spanish King had determined to crush Protestantism out of his Dutch provinces "by the fire, the pit, and the sword." It was better, he publicly said, "not to reign at all than to reign over heretics;" and the engines of Papist persecution were accordingly set in motion to extricate the very name of the Reformation from the land. But the Dutchmen were not of the stuff which easily yields to priests and Princes in the matter of conscience and right; they showed a spirit which made Granvelle and Margaret hesitate to carry out Philips hideous commands ……..
Our English Government should at this juncture have aged Holland. Philip had already tried to have Queen Elizabeth assassinated; and the quarrel of the Dutchmen was that of liberty, of rational religion, and human progress. But the gallant race was left alone, while the horrible massacre of St. Bartholomew wrought by Charles of France very soon showed that no help would come from their neighbours…….
It was in the very year when (the Duke of) Alva’s executioners were busiest with rope, stake, and axe -- the very year when the gutters of Paris ran with Huguenot blood, and the feeble Charles was screaming "kill, kill," and shooting men and women out of his window -- that this brave deed at Brill turned the scale. A company of fugitives equipped a fleet of "scows" and "schoets," and, proudly calling themselves "Guex de Mer," or "Beggars of the Sea," they attacked Brill on the first April 1572, after a most glorious piece of amphibious fighting drove Alva’s spearmen out of the town, and made it irrevocably their own. Let those who wish to know why the Dutch keep so great a national holiday to-day read the full story of that gallant deed; how the sturdy water-dogs took the ditches neck-deep, waded the flats, and made a battle-field of the mud and ooze to get at the murderers of their brothers and sisters.
When Holland heard of that splendid beginning, she rose with a cry of glorious unanimity; aided by Zealand, she defied and even attacked th bloody ALVA; she made every dyke a fortress, every village a citadel. Haarlem, defended principally by Dutch women, kept the whiskered Dons at bay for full seven months; Leyden – fiercely assaulted, and decimated internally by famine and pestilence – was saved by the sea, which was let in over the “polders,” and which, like the familiar and friendly ally that it was, brought ships, provisions, and safety. ALVA, who, as he himself boasted, had massacred on the scaffold or in prison eighteen thousand men, women, and children, began to find that blood could never quench the spirit of the obstinate Lowland………]

Thursday 4

Mrs and Miss Norton called

Friday 5

Professor Maurice buried at Highgate

Saturday 6

Went to Westbourne Park Villas

Sunday 7

John took Cleve to Sydenham -- I went to Mr Davies’s Church, (he) spoke eloquently of Maurice's death and of his character. Holroyd dined with us.

[Cleve was 7. Was school at Sydenham?]

Monday 8

Letter from Allan which I took to Maud at Ashley House

Wednesday 10

Maud came to stay with us. I called on Mrs Pyne. J. Sharpe, Edward F., E Cole and Acton spent the evening with us. Maud sang nicely with much feeling. Edward F. and Sharp played piano and violin.

Thursday 11

Dined at the Nortons’, very kind as usual. Louisa Norton played remarkably well on the piano. Maud sang with great taste and feeling as usual.

Friday 12

Maud left us. Holroyd dined with us.

Saturday 13

Called on Mrs Barbara Lodge who is in town -- also on Mrs Nelson. Evegard children came to tea. Effie returned from Croyde, Baby ill.

[Croyde, Bideford Bay, was where Mrs Caroline Emily Skinner lived.]

Monday 15

Effie’s Baby very ill with measles

Tuesday 16

Went to Holroyd's

Wednesday 17

Maud Kate and Henry came to luncheon

[Who was Henry? Could be Ayrton’s son but more likely Henry Allan Holden Steward]

Thursday 18

Went to Holroyd's

Friday 19

Went to see baby -- better

Saturday 20

Went to see Holroyd's baby, found him better.

Sunday 21

At home all day with bad cold. Cleve walked alone to Portman Square.

Monday 22

Came to Stow Upland, found Edith and Ursula well. The cottage very well situated.

Tuesday 23

Walked into Stowmarket with Ursula and servant. Holroyd went to Paris

Wednesday 24

Weather cloudy and cold. Mrs Cookson called. Letter from Frederick.

Thursday 25

Ayrton returned from London with Mrs Chambers and her son accompanied by his dog and a ferret -- he over 12 wanted his mother to sleep with him so they went to the hotel for the night.

Friday 26

Edith taken ill. Mrs Chambers left at one o'clock. Little girl born at 3.20 very like Ursula, a healthy child. Edith well through bearing well what pain she had. No nurse to be had, so washed the baby etc.

[Birth of Audrey Chaplin, grandmother of Ann Mendell née Gregory]

Saturday 27

Edith and child who has not yet opened her eyes, doing well

Sunday 28

Went to church with E Chambers. Lost our way and arrived very tired at the end of the Litany. Ayrton’s sermon much improved.

Monday 29

With Edith, all going on well and baby opened her eyes which seemed not to bear the light well. Walked into Stowmarket.

Tuesday 30

Walked into Stowmarket, received letter from Mattie.


May

Thursday 2

Baby and Edith well. Went to Stowmarket market day.

Friday 3

Weather cold

Saturday 4

Went to Stowmarket. Met Mrs (?) Barney. Edith and babe going on well. Wrote to Mattie

Sunday 5

Went to church in the afternoon. Ayrton preached to a full church etc. -- very well and fervently.

Monday 6

Edith and babe going on very well. Weather cold, did not go out. Had a cold. Letter from Holroyd

Tuesday 7

Not very well, no letters. A thunderstorm and the air chilly.

Thursday 9

Weather remarkably cold

Friday 10

Much rain and cold

Saturday 18

E Chambers went home

Sun 19

Went to afternoon church

Monday 20

Ayrton went to London thence with Mrs Chambers and boy to Llandudno. Weather fine and warm.

Tuesday 21

Edith came downstairs.

Friday 24

Left Stow Upland, came to York Street (or square?). Florrie, Holroyd, Effie, Kate & Miss Skinner came in the evening. F. sang charmingly.

[Did she live at York Street? From Sunday 26 it seems that Kate was Katherine Westby née Skinner, mother of Bryda and daughter of Allan Maclean Skinner. Miss Skinner was probably her aunt, Marianne Skinner]

Saturday 25

Ottie and Henry came and went out with Cleve. Julia Louie John and Cleve left at midday for Hamburg and Lubeck. I came to Holroyd.

[Henry was Henry Allan Holden Steward, and Ottie his brother]

Sunday 26

Went to church at St. Stephens, into the afternoon to Bonomis, all well and genial as usual. Called on Mrs Harcourt Slade. On our return Florrie Miss Skinner Kate Westby C Feild and Charlie Celli came in and stayed late.


Monday 27

At home all morning. Afternoon went with Effie to the Carrs. Effie's portrait like -- but gives the impression of a totally different person.

Tuesday 28

Called on the Pynes to lunch. Afterwards went to Highgate to see poor Ellen who is certainly worse -- such a contrast to her sweet child so full of fun and life. Returned at ten o'clock.

Wednesday 29

Went to Royal Academy early, a pretty little picture by Emma Squire. Glorious landscapes by V Cole and portraits by Millais. Called on Mrs Whichcote and on Miss Shurrs. Miss L S is wonderfully well and the elder sister over 95 well though confined by her accident. Edward dined here. Letters from Julia and Louie at Lubeck -- and from Mattie.

Thursday 30

Went in the morning with Holroyd, got a perambulator for little Allan Nugent. Wrote letters in the afternoon to Julia and Louie. Holroyd dined out.

[Allan Nugent, known always as Nugent Chaplin, Holroyd’s oldest son]

Friday 31

Called on Florance and on Alice Barnwell in York Street, home to luncheon then to call on Mrs Nelson, Mrs Pyne, Mrs Evegard. Left London at 9 pm via Southampton and Havre for Paris -- good passage -- found Mattie well. Many evidences of war just outside the walls and we came very quickly over.

[Mattie was studying in Paris]

June

Saturday 1

The temporary railway bridge; some railway sheds quite riddled by shot. The Tuileries a ruin except the tower next the Seine which is uninjured. The Ministère des affaires etrangères much damaged.

Sunday 2

Walked in the afternoon in the Luxembourg with Mattie and little Joseph, went into the gallery -- beautiful picture by Muller of the "days of la Terreur” in 1792, pretty metal statue of a troubadour by…... Wrote to Julia.

[Who was little Joseph?]

Monday 3

Walked with Mattie to see Mme Nuymen(?). Paris looks much less gay than in former times. Saw from the steamer on the river sad memorials of the days of the Commune. Posted letter to Julia.

Tuesday 4

Walked with Miss Barker to the Panthéon to look at a monument to Bonrepaire, Napoleon’s first general, who shot himself rather than give up Verdun to the Prussians -- but could not find it -- went to St Etienne de Mont, chanced on the monumental inscription to Blaise Pascal. Wrote to Ayrton. Went to Theatre Daudeville to see Sardain’s(?) play of Ra?dgas(?)-- a caricature of the French (?) of themselves.

Wednesday 5

Walked to Hotel de Ville, a sad and beautiful ruin. I did not expect that I could have been affected as I was by it. Consoled myself by looking at pretty things in shop windows. Posted letters to Ayrton and Holroyd

Thursday 6

Maud left England to join Allan. Walked with Mlle Henriette to Louvre. Beautiful objects of art in Salle d’(?), a less interesting collection of pictures than ours. A great storm about 10.30 pm. I wonder if Maud felt it!

[Where was Maud going, to join Allan? Must have been India?]

Friday 7

Went to see Comtesse de Broc -- who with the Count seems to live in the lap of luxury. She gladly welcomed an English friend. Walked home by Champs Elysées -- not many people about. Where can all the Paris beau monde and bas monde be? Surely all cannot have been (?) out by revolution. Wrote to Mrs Rollings and Holroyd.

Saturday 8

I walked with Mattie into the old part of Paris. Reading Carlysle's history a similarity in idea between this revolution and that but how much improved are the people. Air cool for this month. Cannot always sit with windows open.

Sunday 9

Letter from Mrs Skinner of Maud's departure. Went to the Oratoire with Mr and Mrs Barker afterwards to see the ruined Tuileries. A slight wire drawn across three yards from the building prevents the people going in. The centre part is I think the oldest, is the least ruined except the new tower next the Seine where the fire did not extend. The people enjoy the hitherto private gardens. Lovely beds of roses but not much flower gardening. The view from the centre of palace very fine. Such a coup d’oeil of two miles extent, not to be matched.

Monday 10

Went to Jardins des Plantes -- while looking at monkeys crowd driven under trees by violent tropical rain. Letter from Julia and Louie and Cleve.

[It seems that Julia and Louie did a lot of things together, especially when John was away. They were the two oldest sisters, followed by three boys, so no doubt they had to collaborate a good deal when they were children!]

Tuesday 11

Rain all morning Mme de la Voye called. Went to see Palais des Beaux Arts. Answered Julia's letter and posted it.

Wednesday 12

At home morning. Evening at Mme de la Voye’s. Wrote to Maud at Suez.

Thursday 13

Went to exhibition of modern pictures and sculpture. Boat too full to take in all who were waiting so walked there, found long queue waiting to get in - appointed to meet Mattie at picture 40. Enquired for same -- answer – “Oh, mais les a tous changé,” so wandered around looking at pictures. Mattie and I met at a charming bronze of a child with cock which he had tied to his little cannon and it has flown at him, child evidently shrieking - by Cecioni a Florentine. Wrote and posted letter to Holroyd. Letters from Louie and Cleve, also from Edith.

Friday 14

Went to read in Luxembourg Gardens, afterwards with Mattie to Bon Marché, a great shop like Schoolbred’s(?) to buy black grenadine – dearer than in London.

Saturday 15

Walked with Annie Barker to Bon Marché and down R. du Bac. Wrote letter to Edith and posted it.

Sunday 16

Went with Mattie, Mrs Archer and Barker to vespers at Notre Dame. Received letter from Julia and posted letter to her enclosing one from Mattie.

Monday 17

Went to Luxembourg Gardens in the afternoon to read, met Mattie there. Evening to Mme de la Voye. Met there M. (?) the etymologist, and two Ladies.

Tuesday 18

Went to the Beaux Arts to see De la Roche's fine picture of the Different schools of Painters in Europe, then to the Louvre to see the Limoge enamel china and Claude Lorraine’s landscapes, met with the original of Edith's picture the Infante Marguerite by Velasquez, saw a lady making a very good copy of (?) St. Paul. Mme de Broc called, did not see her. Received Spectator from Holroyd

Wednesday 19

Weather intensely hot (?) 14? in sun, 81 in shade. Read in Gardens -- storm rose about 4 - violent rain -- thunder and lightning -- finished reading Meunier d’Angibault (?) fine descriptions of scenery and character and worthy aim of the author to promote (?) purity and philanthropy.

Thursday 20

Walked with Mattie. Sent books for Cleve and letters to Holroyd, Mrs Skinner, Ayrton and Allan. In the evening with Mademoiselle Henriette and Annie to see Roi Carotte. Mattie with us. Mise en scène very good, - too long for Opera Bouffe -- from 7.30 to 12 o'clock. Enough to make two pieces. Letter from Louie.

Friday 21

Reading in the morning. A liberal Protestant French clergyman M.Grose breakfasted here with his wife (a cousin of Madame’s). Walked in the afternoon. Wrote to Edward.

Saturday 22

Walked all morning. Went to see Gobelins tapestry -- good for wall decoration. Letter from Julia.

Sunday 23

Went with Mattie Miss Barr and Joseph to St Cloud. Gardens very pretty in the French style and the Chateau a ruin which may be very picturesque 30 or 40 years hence. Very interesting today, remembering that the French themselves destroyed it for an idea. All very tired.

Monday 24

Mattie heard from Will who was detained at Truncomalce. Wrote to Mme Celli and Holroyd.

Tuesday 25

Went to the annual exhibition of pictures with Mattie. The French excel in painting young children -- perhaps because these live more with their parents than do ours. Wrote to Julia and Cleve. Letters from Holroyd and Edith.

Wednesday 26

Did not go out. Wrote to Mrs Wallis with Wills letter to Edward. Not well. Reading George Sand’s "Petite Tadette". Very pretty.

[Mrs Wallis, perhaps a neighbour or friend of Edward Ayrton who kept an eye on him?]

Thursday 27

Not well -- did not go out. Received money from bank.

Friday 28

Agnes baby (boy) is born at Dunstable. Went to R.de Bac to buy black silk, everything at high prices. Wrote to bank. Maud at Suez.

[Maud was on her way to India, see 16 August. Agnes Nugent Ayrton was daughter of Frederick Ayrton, so was MAC’s niece. Her son was Frederick, the future Bishop Nugent Hicks of Lincoln Cathedral]

Saturday 29

Working -- went out. Finished in George Sand’s "Petite Tadette," quite a poem of rural life -- improbable but sufficiently possible to be very readable, full of sketches of nature. Story of twins so resembling that an ideal similarity or tie of nature suggests the situation. La Tadette a moral Joan of Arques

Sunday 30

Wrote to Ellen and Agnes. Letter from Louie. Went to Jardin des Plantes with Joseph.

July

Monday 1

Walked to Maison Cluny to buy some black satin, dearer than in London.

Tuesday 2

At home working all morning. Posted letter to Louie. Called with Mattie on Mrs Woolley in the evening. Reading "Les Maitres Sonneurs" by G. Sand -- tale of life in Bourbonnais

Wednesday 3

Out before breakfast. Working all day. Walked to Quais Desaix. Letter from Allan dated 7 June

[Allan was in India. Three weeks to get a letter to Paris]

Friday 5

(?) working. Letter from Agnes about herself and baby, all going on well. Weather hot.

Saturday 6

Walked with Mattie.

Sunday 7

Wrote to Julia with copies of Mrs Wallis’s letter and Sankey’s opinion and sent Agnes’s letter. Received letter from Julia. Mattie went to Charenton.

Monday 8

Worked in the morning. Walked to R.du Bac. Mme Laurent Mme Kergonard’s sister died here. Reading "Les Maitres Sonneurs" by Georges Sand.

Tuesday 9

At work in the morning. Walked with Joseph to Palais Royal. Wrote to Frederick. Received letter from Louie announcing .....

Wednesday 10

Went with Mattie to look at and buy china in the Paradis(?), R St Denis.

Thursday 11

Wrote to Effie. Walked with Mademoiselle Henriette to look at their new apartments. Brought books at Hachettes. Mattie dined at Dr Roget’s.

Friday 12

Mattie passed the examination. Walked to R du Bac.

Saturday 13

Left Paris at 7.30 am. -- travelled via Calais and Dover, reached London at 5.30 (no trouble about luggage) at Charing Cross station -- drove to 21 Westbourne Park Villas. Holroyd and Effie at Highgate. Slept there.

[In 1871, according to the Census, Holroyd was at 21 Westbourne Park Villas.]

Sunday 14

Mattie went to see Mme Celli. I went to Mrs Pyne’s, all out -- went to Trinity Church.

Monday 15

Found lodgings at 118 Queens Road -- moved there. Holroyd and Effie returned. Letters from Edith and Louie. Went to see Holroyd and Effie, baby well and grown. Wrote to Ayrton.

Tuesday 16

Went to International Exhibition -- French artists in excellent taste. Wrote to Mrs Skinner, to Mme Kergonard.

Wednesday 17

Looked at house in Princes Square, went to see Mme Celli.

Thursday 18

Effie called, looked at house. Called on Mrs Pyne, saw Mrs Henvey. Heard of Arthur Dixon’s death.. Charlie came to tea, Effie to dinner. Letter from Ayrton.

Friday 19

Walked. Wrote to Allan. The little Henveys came to tea. Dined at Holroyd's. Read Middlemarch.

Saturday 20

Called on Josephine, Mrs Nelson. Dined at Holroyd's. Letter from Julia.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen’s Church, Rowsell preached. Called on Holroyd and Effie. Heat very great.

Monday 22

Heat intense -- storm and heavy rain cooled the air. Called on Mrs L. Shurr who was 80 on 4th of June. She looks pretty and about 60, a man might fall in love with her I think. Letter from Allan saying vessel containing Maud had stuck in Suez Canal.

Tuesday 23

Went to Industrial Exhibition with Mattie. The tunnel on the King's Cross and Farringdon Street line so filled with water by the storm that the trains could not pass through. Heat intense. Average 88 in the shade.

Wednesday 24

To Highgate found myself at Kentish Town, returned to King's Cross then on so passed a hot tedious two hours -- found Ellen worse -- no sensation from her thighs down to her to toes and face much altered – saw J Taylor and Miss Adshead. Storm impending but I got home before it broke.

Thursday 25

Secured lodgings next door for ….. Julia Louie John and Cleve who arrived from Travenmunde via Hamburgh dined with us. Effie came in the evening.

Friday 26

Walked with Cleve in the morning. Went to Kensington Gardens in the afternoon with Louie Wallis and Cleve who wanted much to see the Albert Memorial.

Saturday 27

Went to Holroyd directly after breakfast about apartment agreement. Spent the afternoon in Kensington Gardens, examined with Cleve some of the (?) on Albert memorial.

Sunday 28

Went to Bayswater Church. Effie and baby came.

Monday 29

Took Cleve and Willy Henvey to see the clever performance of Marionettes at St. James’s Hall.

Wednesday 31

Walked with Louie at Highgate. Alice Grenfell called. Cleve dined with Acton. The Edinburgh University adgudged to give the ladies their degrees.

August

Thursday 1

Took Cleve to Highgate. On my return found Urle had arrived. Louie dined here. Went to Holroyd’s in the evening.

Friday 2

Went to Effie's. Letter from Agnes. Josephine called. Wrote to Edward and Mrs Wallis to Edith.

Saturday 3

Holroyd and Effie went to stay with (?). I came with Cleve to take care of Holroyd's house.

Sunday 4

Did not go to Church. Weather dank. Walked in Kensington Gardens in the afternoon.

Monday 5

Public holiday -- in consequence of which we had a gentle fast -- as the retail as well as wholesale shops and offices were closed after two o'clock. Louie here most part of the day. At Holroyd's.

Tuesday 6

Went to see Mattie and Will and Julia. Mrs Nelson and Miss Dardis called. Went to Mrs Pyne's with Cleve. A note from Holroyd -- Livingstones letter to Granville published.

[This is the first mention of Mattie and Will together since Will left the UK early in 1870.]

[A press cutting is included from the Daily News, Monday July 29, 1872: Letter from Dr Livingstone: we are indebted to the courtesy of the New York Herald for the following letter, which appeared in that paper on Saturday:

South Eastern Central Africa, February, 1872
My dear Sir,
I wish to say a little about the slave trade in eastern Africa. It is not a very inviting subject and to some I may appear as supposing your readers to be very much akin to the old lady who relished her paper for neither births deaths nor marriages, but for good, racy, bloody murders. I am, however, far from fond of the horrible -- often wished I could forget the scenes I have seen, and certainly never tried to inflict on others the sorrow which being a witness of "man's inhumanity to man" has often entailed on myself.
Some of your readers know that about five years ago I undertook, at the instigation of my very dear old friend, Sir Roderick Murchison, Bart, the task of examining the watershed of South Central Africa. The work had a charm for my mind, because the dividing line between North and South was unknown, and a fit object for exploration. Having a work in hand, I at first recommended another for the task; but, on his declining to go without a handsome salary and something to fall back on afterwards, I agreed to go myself and was encouraged by Sir Roderick, saying, in his warm, jovial manner, "You will be the real discover of the sources of the Nile." I thought that two years would be sufficient to go from the coast inland across the head of Lake Nyassa to the watershed, wherever that might be, and after examination, tried to begin a benevolent mission with some tribe on the slope reach to the coast. Had I known all the time, toil, hunger, hardships and worry involved in that precious water-parting, I might have preferred having my head shaved, and a blister put on it, to grappling with my good old friend's task. But, having taken up the burden, I could not bear to be beaten by it. I shall tell you a little about the progress made by-and-buy.
At present let me give you glimpse of the slave trade to which the search and discovery of most of the Nile fountains has brought me face-to-face. The whole traffic, whether on land or ocean, is a gross outrage of the common law of mankind. It is carried on from age to age, and, in addition to the untold evils its inflicts, it presents almost insurmountable obstacles to intercourse between the different portions of the human family. This open sore in the world is partly owing to human cupidity, and partly to ignorance of the more civilised of mankind of the blight which lights chiefly on the more degraded. Piracy on the high seas was once as common as slave-trading is now. But as it became thoroughly known the whole civilised world rose against it. In now trying to make the Eastern African slave trade better known to Americans, I indulge the hope that I am aiding on, though in a small degree, the good time coming yet when slavery as well as piracy shall be chased from the world.
Many have but a faint idea of the evils that trading in slaves inflicts on the victims and on the authors of the atrocities. Most people imagine that negroes, after being brutalised by a long course of servitude with but few of the ameliorating influences that elevate more favoured races, are fair average specimens of the African man. Our ideas are derived from the slaves of the West Coast, who have for ages been subjected to domestic bondage and all the depressing agencies of a most unhealthy climate. These have told most injuriously on their physical frames, while fraud and trade rum have ruined their moral natures. Not to discriminate the difference is monstrous injustice to the main body of the population living free in the interior under their own chiefs and laws - cultivating their own farms, catching the fish of their own rivers, or fighting bravely with the grand old denizens of the forests, which in more recent continents can only be reached in rocky strata or under perennial ice Winwoode Reade hit on the truth when he said the ancient Egyptian, with his large round black eyes, full luscious lips and somewhat depressed nose, is far nearer the typical negro than the West Coast African, who has been debased by the unhealthy land he lives in. Slaves generally -- and especially those on the West Coast, at Zanzibar and elsewhere -- are extremely ugly. I have no prejudice against their colour: indeed, anyone who lives long among them forgets that they are black, and feels that they are just fellow-man. But the low retreating forehead, prognathus jaws, lark heels, and other physical peculiarities common among slaves and West Coast Negroes, always awakens the same feelings of aversion as those with which we view specimens of the "Bill Sykes" and "bruiser" class in England. I would not utter a syllable calculated to press down either class more deeply in the mire in which they are already sunk. But I wish to point out that these are not typical Africans, any more than typical Englishman, and that the natives of nearly all the high lands of the interior of the continent are, as a rule, fair average specimens of humanity. I happened to be present when all the head men of the great chief Insama, who lives west of the south end of Tanganyika, had come together to make peace with certain Arabs who had burned their chief town, and I am certain one could not see more finely-formed intellectual heads in any assembly in London or Paris, and the faces and forms corresponded with the finely-shaped heads. Insama himself had been a sort of Napoleon for fighting and conquering in his younger days, was exactly like the ancient Assyrians sculptured on the Nineveh marbles as Nimrod and others; and he showed himself to be one of ourselves by habitually indulging in copious potations beer, called pombe, and had become what Nathaniel Hawthorne called "bulbous" below the ribs. I don't know where the phrase "bloated aristocracy" arose. It must be American, for I have had glimpses of a good many English noblemen, and Insama was the only specimen of a bloated aristocrat on whom I ever set my eyes.
Many of the women were very pretty, and, like all ladies, would have been much prettier if they had only let themselves alone. Fortunately, the dears could not change their charming black eyes, beautiful forehead and s, nicely rounded limbs, well-shaped forms and small hands and feet. But they must adorn themselves, and this they do -- oh, the hussies! -- by filing their splendid teeth to points like cats teeth. It was distressing, for it made their smile, which had so much power over us great he donkeys, like that of the crocodile. Ornaments are scarce. What would our ladies do, if they had none, but to pout and lecture us on "women's rights!" But these specimens of the fair sex make shift by adorning their fine, warm, brown skins, tattooing various pretty devices without colours, that besides purposes of beauty serve the heraldic uses of our Highland tartans. They are not black, but of a light, warm brown colour, and so very sisterly -- if I may use the new coinage -- it feels an injury done to oneself to see a bit of grass stuck through the cartilage of the nose, so as to bulge out the aloe nasi (wings of the nose of anatomists). Cazembe’s Queen – Moari a Ngombe by name -- would be esteemed a real beauty either in London, Paris, or New York, and yet she had a small hole through the cartilage near the tip of her fine slightly aqualine nose. But she had only filed one side of the two front of her superb snow-white teeth; and then what a laugh she had! Let those who wish to know go and see her carried to her farm in her pony phaeton, which is a sort of throne fastened on to very long polls, and carried by 12 stalwart citizens. If they take Punch’s motto for Cazembe, "Niggers don't require to be shot here," as their own, they may show themselves to be men; but, whether they do or not, Cazembe will show himself a man of sterling good sense.
Now these people, so like ourselves externally, have genuine human souls. Rua, a very large section of country north and west of Cazembe’s, but still in the same inland region, is peopled by men very like those of Insama and Cazembe. An Arab, Syde Bin Habib , went to trade in Rua two years ago, and as the Arabs usually do where the natives have no guns, , Syde Bin Habib’s elder brother carried matters with a high hand. The Rua men observed that the elder brother slept in a white tent, and, pitching their spears into it by night, killed him. As Moslems never forgive bloodshed, the younger brother forthwith ran amuck on all indiscriminately in a large district. Let it not be supposed that any of these people are like the American Indians -- insatiable bloodthirsty savages, who will not be reclaimed, or enter into terms of lasting friendship with fair-dealing strangers. Had the actual murderers being demanded, and a little time been granted, I feel morally certain, from many other instances among tribes who, like the Ba Rua, have not been spoilt by Arab traders, they would all have been given up. The chiefs of the country would, first of all, have specified the crime of which the elder brother was guilty and who had been led to avenge it. It is very likely that they would stipulate that no other should be punished than the actual perpetrator. Domestic slaves, acting under his orders, would be considered free from blame. I know of nothing that distinguishes the uncontaminated Africans from other degraded peoples more than their entire reasonableness and good sense. It is different after they have had wives, children, and relatives kidnapped; but that is more than human nature, civilised or savage, can bear. In the case in question, indiscriminate slaughter, capture, and plunder took place. A very large number of very fine young men were captured and secured in chains and wooden yokes.
I came near the party of Syde Bin Habib, close to the point where a huge vent in the mountains of Rua allows the escape of the great river Lualaba out of Lake Moero. And here I had for the first time an opportunity of observing the difference between slaves and freeman made captives. When fairly across Lualaba, , Syde thought his captives safe, and got rid of the trouble of attending to and watching the chained gangs by taking off both chains and yokes. All declared their joy and perfect willingness to follow Syde to the end of the world, or elsewhere; but next morning 22 made clear off to the mountains. Many more on seeing the broad Lualaba roll between them and the homes of their infancy, lost all heart and in three days eight of them died. They had no complaint but pain in the heart, and they pointed out its seat correctly; though many believe that the heart is situated underneath the top of the sternum or breast bone. This to me was the most starting death I ever sas. They evidently died of broken-heartedness, and the Arabs wondered, "seeing that they had plenty to eat." I saw others perish, particularly a very fine boy of ten or 12 years of age. When asked where he felt ill, he put his hand correctly and exactly over the heart. He was kindly carried, and as he breathed out his soul was laid gently on the side of the path. The captives were not unusually cruel. They were callous -- slaving had hardened their hearts. When Syde, who was an old friend of mine, crossed the Lualaba, he heard that I was in a village where a company of slave traders had been furiously assaulted for three days by justly incensed by Babeemba. I would not fight nor allow my people to fire if I saw them, because that the Babeemba had been especially kind to me. Syde senat a party of his own people to invite me to leave the village by night and come to him. He showed himself the opposite of hard-hearted; but slaving "hardens all within, and petrifies the feelings." It is bad for the victims, and ill for victimisers.
This is about half the letter]

Wednesday 7

Holroyd and Effie came home with baby -- left in the evening for Havre and Paris. Baby remains with me and Cleve -- he is the sweetest little nurse and calls himself "Papa Cleve." Baby delights in watching him about.

Thursday 8

Went with baby and Cleve. Cleve reading dramatically Macaulay’s Lays of Rome which dwelt so in his mind that when reading the life of Columbus which much interested him before, he said "You don't find a book so very interesting when you are wanting to read another book all the time -- though it is very pretty."

Friday 9

Walked with Baby in the morning, again in the afternoon. Enquired for apartments. Acton defended himself in the House against Dr Hooker of Kew. Report at length in the Times. Called on Louie and saw Mattie.

Saturday 10

Went three times to Queens Road. Mme Celli there in the evening.


Sunday 11

Cleve went to his mother in Queens Road. I went to St. Stephen’s -- at Louie’s in the evening. Miss Skinner came in the evening.

Monday 12

Louie and Cleve left at ten o'clock for Bristol to visit Miss Millington on the way to Mrs Skinner's. Went to house agent in Edgware Road. On way home, lost purse containing only 6 or 7 pence -- had taken £7 from it before I left home. Julia went to Mme Celli's in evening. Mrs Whichcote called.

Tuesday 13

Went to house agent's

Wednesday 14

Looked at houses. Julia went to Highgate. Ellen better. Letter from Louie about her journey to Bideford with Cleve.

Thursday 15

Looked at houses. Letter from Effie. Wrote to Mattie.

Friday 16

Went to see Miss Skinner, read part of letter from Maud beautifully expressing her first impressions of India, which account puts a real country and its customs vividly before me. Wrote to Allan.

Sunday 18

Went to St. Stephen’s church

Monday 19

Went to Highgate. Ellen better. Wrote to Mrs Spooner and Mrs Whichcote about Ayrton. Harriet Henvey confined with a girl.

Tuesday 20

Julia went to Highgate called on M Celli at her office at the French chapel. Miss Sullivan came in and told us that Miss Archer had come. Wrote to Mattie. Acton called -- told me that Emma had put her husband's affairs in Chancery.

[French chapel at Highgate? Worth investigating? Edward’s illnesss serious, since Emma had put his affairs in Chancery]

Wednesday 21

Miss Sullivan dined with me. Walked out with Miss Archer in the afternoon.

Thursday 22

Went to look at house in Garway(?) Road likely to suit Julia, returned from Highgate.

Sunday 25

Went to St. Stephens.

Monday 26

Ada Dixon in town ill, operated upon under chloroform.

[Ada Dixon was a daughter of Elizabeth Maria Dixon née James, sister of Harriet James, whose daughter Edith married MAC’s son Ayrton Chaplin].

Thursday 29

Called on Mr Henry Smith in Lansdowne Road -- saw an imbecile child who lives with them and is as happy as an imbecile can be made. Wrote to Louie and Effie at Jersey.

Friday 30

Walked to Mrs Pyne's -- saw little Bernard, an interesting child.

[Bernard – 3 yr old son of Alice née Pyne and John Grenfell. See 23 Jan and 18 March]

Saturday 31

Went to Kensington Gardens with Holroyd's baby -- he was much amused with the swans ducks and dogs and sociable with children. Letter from Ayrton.

[Holroyd’s baby was his eldest son Nugent, born 8 June 1871]

September

Sunday 1 to Saturday 7

At Holroyd's, taking care of baby

Sunday 8

Went to St. Stephens Church -- Mattie and Will came

Tuesday 10

Went with Holroyd's baby to Waterloo Station to send him to Haling Island. Dined with Holroyd. Took apartments with Julia at 130 Queens Road.

[It seems that MAC was between houses? Holroyd’s baby apparently got to Haling Island by magic – probably taken by one of the invisible people from below stairs!]

Saturday 14

Mattie and Will dined with us.

Sunday 15

Went to the iron church. Mattie and Will came in the evening.

Monday 16

Holroyd

Tuesday 17

Mattie dined with me at Holroyd's. Called on Mattie.

Wednesday 18

Wrote to Cleve a note for him to receive on his birthday -- Johnny has returned from Berlin whence he chronicled for the Daily News the doings of the three Emperors -- called with Holroyd and went on to Devon. Mrs Whichcote called.

[So John Edwin Hilary Skinner was known as Johnny!]

Thursday 19

Went to Highgate to see Ann who is staying with Ellen. Ellen much the same. Child very well. Will came to see me here about professorship at Glasgow.

[Ann Feild née Chaplin, sister of John Clarke Chaplin, was Ellen Taylor’s mother – see also 1 and 14 Feb and 18 March]

Friday 20

Received letter from Louie. Called on Mrs Whichcote. Wrote to Edward and to Mrs Wallace.

Saturday 21

Holroyd called. Received letter from Miss Archer. Extremely cold. Will Mattie and Holroyd dined with us.

Sunday 22

Went to French church. Holroyd dined with us.

Monday 23

Julia went to Highgate. Weather very cold.

Tuesday 24

Weather very wet and cold. Dined at Mrs Whichcote’s, met a pleasant young parson named Mann. Mrs W. subscribed to vicarage at Stowe Upland.

[NB: ‘Subscribed to vicarage’?]

Wednesday 25

Letter from Louie. Ann and Miss Adshead spent the day here. Walked with Ann to Mme Celli’s and after lunch to new house 60 Westbourne Park Road. Holroyd came to dinner. Reading "Life of Dickens." Mattie called.

[Whose new house – MAC’s or Ann Chaplin’s? I assume the former. She was at 21 Westbourne Park Villas (Holroyd’s house) on 1 and 4 April, and slept there on 13 July]

Thursday 26

Called on Mrs Thorne -- out. Called on Mrs Nelson, all in mourning for Colonel Nelson, her husband's brother.

Friday 27

Received letters from Mrs Wallis -- Edward better, also from Allan and Maud and Mrs Skinner. Wrote to Maud a long letter also a note to thank Mrs Wallis -- called on Burr about house. Holroyd went to Penshurst, Julia to dentist.

[Burr possibly a solicitor?]

Saturday 28

Called on Mrs Thorne, met Mattie there. Mrs T’s little girls grow very pretty, beautiful specimens of English girlhood. The little boys charming.

[Who was Mrs Thorne?]

Sunday 29

Went to the French Church -- Mme Celli and her two sons there. An eloquent sermon by Gaie, a young Swiss. Will and Mattie here to tea. Supper much laughing.

[Julia, Mattie and Ann all visited Mme Celli and Edward was a friend of Charlie Celli. What was the connection? The French Church was at Highgate, see 20 Aug]

Monday 30

Dined at Mattie's, talked of the proposal to Will to go to Japan.

[William Ayrton just back from India, and now about to go to Japan.]

October

Tuesday 1

Went to Holroyd's in the evening, he had a cold. Saw Edward there. Acton also.

Wednesday 2

Went to house in the morning. Julia went to Highgate, called on Mattie, went with her & Will to Mrs Nelson's. Julia met us there. Miss Nugent was there, she has grown very fat. Wrote to Agnes.

[House might have been 60 Westbourne Pk Rd? Miss Nugent is a puzzle. MAC’s daughter Julia’s husband was James Edward Nugent, but MAC would not have referred to one of Julia’s daughters as ‘Miss’. More likely to have been a sister of James Edward, but he had only brothers according to my research so far.]

Thursday 3

Letters from Louie and Kate Skinner. A severe storm. Rain quite tropical for a few minutes. Wrote about Rannes…(?) Lister for a servant. Called at Holroyd's.

Friday 4

Went to Holroyd's. Dined at Acton's -- met Ayrton there, and Holroyd.

Saturday 5

Wrote to Mrs Spooner and Louie. Went to Holroyd's expecting to see Effie and baby, but they had not arrived -- walked about.

Sunday 6

Went to the Iron Church. Will and Mattie dined here. Holroyd Effie and baby called. Charlie Celli & Edward supped with us.

Monday 7

Went to Debenhams -- called on Mrs Nelson, Evegards, Mrs Pyne's – Helen’s boys at Rugby with whooping cough -- Constance ill at Brighton. Mrs Pyne walked with me back.

Tuesday 8

Letters from Mrs Skinner, Louie. Called on Effie. Holroyd dined here. Read Middlemarch -- wonderful to delineation of character and analyses of life. Mental paintings, highly finished by a great genius -- should the book live it will be a fine history of the spirit of this age as well as of society. Went to see Mattie and to take her Middlemarch etc.

Thursday 10

Letter from Mrs Wallis. Wrote to her and to Mrs Law. Wrote to Acton. Ann spent the day here and went with Julia to see Miss L. Shurr. Edward dined here.

[Three Chaplin sisters were in Brompton Square at Miss Smith and the Misses Shurrs’ school: Ann was one, Louisa and Sarah probably the others.]

Friday 11

Letter from Allan. Went with Mattie to look for apartments in Finsbury Square, Devonshire and Spittal(?) Squares, then on to Old-Ford -- could not find anything to suit and very few apartments of any kind there. A note from Acton.

[Why was she looking for apartments in Finsbury Square?]

Saturday 12

Went with Julia to call on Mrs Whichcote. Looked into the Kensington Museum -- pretty miniature of Duchess of Devonshire reminded me of Florance. Mrs Pyne spent the evening with us.

Sunday 13

Went to the Iron Church -- good sermon, good singing.

Monday 14

Went to an office to find a servant -- not many to be found now. Holroyd came in the evening. Julia dined at Mme Celli's.

Tuesday 15

At home. All morning read Miss Jex Blake’s able arguments for the study of medicine as a profession for women. To St. Johns Wood for the character of a servant. Called at Effie's, baby well. Puzzled at his return home. Julia went to Mattie's.

Friday 18

Furniture moved from pantechnicon, where it had been for one year and three-quarters, to 60 Westbourne Park Road, have taken that house on lease for 7, 14, or 21 years. Very wet day. Louie and Cleve came back from Devonshire. Cleve slept at 130 Queens Road. Emily Loveday came at £16 a year, finds herself in tea and sugar.

[130 Queen’s Rd was Julia’s place - MAC’s temporary accommodation. I think Emily got tea and sugar on top of her wage.]


Saturday 19

Remainder of furniture moved. Louie and John at 60 Alexander Street. Cleve always calls it Alexandria Street.

Sunday 20

Went to see Mattie and Will in the E India Road, all new neighbourhood to me. Very wet, travelled by the train omnibus for the first time, went to St. Botolph’s Church

Monday 21

At 60 Westbourne Park Road, very much occupied arranging furniture. Cleve very happy playing alone nearly all day in the attic. Slept at Westbourne Park Road.

Tuesday 22

Much occupied. Julia came to Westbourne Park Road with all our belongings. Cleve slept here -- much amused with "Old Curiosity Shop" and acting the story.

Wednesday 23

Julia took Cleve to see panorama of route to India -- well painted -- occupied with house.

Thursday 24

Mrs Norton called

Friday 25

Louie and Cleve went to Newgate. Received letter from Allan.

Saturday 26

John came in and told us about play of Charles Ist then went to Margate. Occupied with house, got carpet down.

Sunday 27

Went to St. Stephen’s, fine sermon by Mr Rowsell. Mattie and Will dined and spent evening here. Holroyd and Effie and C Celli to tea. Mattie slept here.

Monday 28

Mattie left early for the dispensary. Much engaged all day. Mattie dined here. I went with them to the Lyceum to see Charles I, very pretty and most grand -- but did not come up to my expectation. The (?) are so fine that Shakespeare would have made a magnificent tragedy from them, but the first act is very sweet and at once engages an interest in the play and that interest is quite sustained to the end.

Wednesday 30

Intensely wet all day. Called on Effie. Julia went to Highgate. Received letter from Agnes.

Thursday 31

Walked to Burr's, occupied much with household matters. Johnny came from Margate. Louie and Cleve well, the latter going to school daily. Holroyd and Effie came in to tea. Wrote to Agnes.

November

Friday 1

Received letter from Allan and one from Mrs Skinner. Weather intensely wet. John breakfasted with us and returned to Margate.

Saturday 2

Effie called. Weather very wet. Went to Holroyd's. Wrote to Ann.

Sunday 3

Went to St. Stephen's. Henri & Charlie Celli came in the evening. Holroyd called.

Monday 4

Went to the opening of the Female Medical College, henceforth to be called the Obstetrical College. Ld Houghton(?) into the chair, address read by Dr Rou..(?). Mrs Dr Carlton of Boston spoke and Mattie made a debut, speaking quite to the purpose though nervous.

Tuesday 5

Raining all day. Letters from Allan, Louie.

Wednesday 6

Julia went to Highgate. Went to W(?)house, wrote to Louie. Went to Holroyd's to look to Baby -- he is backward in talking and walking but very observant and intelligent.

Thursday 7

Went in search of carpenter, busy unpacking books and trying to arrange them satisfactorily in large bookcase. Received letter from Florance. Weather finer than for some time past, warm and unseasonably mild. Went to 21 to see baby Allan.

Friday 8

Unpacking and arranging books. Wrote to Allan. Julia wrote to Maud. Holroyd called in the morning.

Saturday 9

Little Allan dined here for the first time, behaved with dignity and tried to feed himself. Went to see Miss Shurr. Miss L. rather feeble. Wrote to Mrs Skinner

Sunday 10

Went to St. Stephen's. Rowsell preached from Amos(?) -- Mattie and Will dined here. Holroyd and Effie came to tea. Mattie remained to sleep. Will returned home. Mattie very poorly with miscarriage. Mrs Anderson came to see her twice.

Tuesday 12

Mrs Anderson came to Mattie, going on well. Received letter from Frederick.

Wednesday 13

Weather very cold. Baby Nugent dined with us. Wrote to Frederick. Holroyd breakfasted with us. Wrote to Louie. Received letter from Edith, Mattie in bed -- better

Friday 15

Mattie better. Wrote to Allan. Dined with Mrs Pyne. Mary P decided to go to St. Thomas’s as Nursing Superintendent. Weather extremely stormy.

Saturday 16

Weather cold and damp. Will came to dinner. Mattie came downstairs. Decorated the garden with chrysanthemums called by the gardener " Zanthelmus" so he respectfully corrected me.

Sunday 17

Went to St. Stephen's. Edward came and Holroyd. Will did not come. Mattie better. Weather very wet.

Monday 18

Mattie returned home. Weather very wet. Wrote to Ayrton. Letter from Louie.

Tuesday 19

Slight promise of fine weather. Called on Mrs Nelson. Julia went to Highgate. Reading Gibbon -- what a charming style of writing. Expresses himself as only those do who are masters of the art of writing and of the subject on which they write. Clearly and (?)fley free from ostentation, pedantry.

Friday 22

Went to Mattie and Will. Mattie pretty well. They decided to leave East India Road.

Saturday 23

Mattie went to Edinburgh, called on Mrs Golding Bird and on Dora Greathead who is staying there; then to Georgina's -- saw her, Josephine and sweet little girl.

Sunday 24

Weather very wild. Went to St. Stephen's, fine sermon on the lesson of the day. Called on Mme Celli. Holroyd and Effie came in the evening.

Monday 25

Received letter from Louie. Card from Mattie (in Edinburgh). Intensely wet the whole day and unseasonably warm.

Tuesday 26

John came to London, arrived late having been to the debating society with Holroyd. Wrote to Mattie.

Wednesday 27

Received letter from Allan. Went with Mme Celli to the meeting of foreign governesses in K G(?) Square. M. (?) de la Harpe addressed them. I went with volunteers to (?). I wrote to Louie. Holroyd and Effie came in the evening. Most virulent attack upon Acton in the Daily News.

Thursday 28

J E H S. returned to Margate. Julia called on Mrs Nelson. Engaged in the house. Called at Effie's and shopped in the Grove.

Friday 29

Julia went to Highgate

Saturday 30

Ursula's birthday. Wet as usual. Will arrived late in the evening to sleep here. Went to church, a good short sermon for the day.

December

Sunday 1

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd called. Effie not well. Will left in the afternoon.

Monday 2

Received letters from Mattie and Louie. Went to Oxford Street, called on Pynes’. Saw Helen G. and little boys (looking delicate).

Tuesday 3

Effie went to Devon. Rained all day. Wrote to Louie.

Wednesday 4

Wrote to Edward, Mrs Wallis.

Thursday 5

Called on Mrs Norton with Julia. Wrote to Edith. Weather cold

Friday 6

Julia not well. Weather wet. Wrote to Mattie. Mary Pyne came to luncheon. Reading "Forster's life of Dickens".

Sunday 8

Went to St. Stephen's, Will dined here. Acton came on his return from Paris.

Monday 9

Received letter announcing the birth of Allan's first child -- boy with blue eyes. Charlie Celli dined here.

Tuesday 10

Went into the city to get a carpet, could not see one which I liked. Julia suffering from neuralgia or toothache.

Wednesday 11

Went again about carpet. Julia called -- reported Louie and Cleve well at Ramsgate. Spent the evening at Miss Shurrs. Miss L. 95 last March, quite cheerful and pleasant.

Thursday 12

Went to Highgate. Ellen much the same. Nellie sympathetic and pretty. Julia pretty well, assisting Mme Celli.

Friday 13

Wrote to Allan to congratulate on child's birth. Mme Celli came to lunch. Anna Willy and Miss Skinner to dinner. Read Middlemarch, a very fine analysis and exposition of character.

Saturday 14

Effie and Holroyd dined here. Will also -- he slept here. Lent Illustrated to Mattie

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen's. Rowsell had gone to Windsor to preach before the Queen. Will left us.

Monday 16

Edith and Ayrton came to London with the two little ones. Ayrton called here with Ursula. I was out, looking for a suitable carpet for my little room. Weather wet. Wrote to Mrs Rollings -- heard from Allan -- Maud going on well.

Tuesday 17

Weather very wet. Sad accounts of innundation's in low lying places. Went to Kent Terrace to see Ayrton Edith and children, little Audrey a charming baby.

Wednesday 18

Letter from Louie. Bought carpet. Called on Mrs Nelson -- all well.

Thursday 19

Edith, Ayrton and Ursula and Audrey came to early dinner, a deeply interesting family party -- children so good. Johnny came to dinner. Holroyd and Effie joined us in the evening. Called at Effie’s -- met Carry there. Weather still very wet.

Friday 20

Carry came. J E H S left me this morning for Margate. Wrote to Allan. Went with Carry to call on Edith and family at Kent Terrace. Heard Mr Rowsell advocate home missions in preference to foreign ones.

Saturday 21

Mattie came from Edinburgh to join her husband at Blackheath.

Monday 23

Went to spend the day with Mattie at Blackheath -- enjoyed much the air and view. Mattie very well.

Wednesday 25

Went to St. Stephen's with Julia. Holroyd and Effie... Ayrton and Ursula (Edith with her mother), Mattie and Will -- dined with us all well and happy. Ursula and Ayrton, Mattie and Will slept here.

Thursday 26

Ayrton and Will went to Bexhill, found Edward much better, Ayrton returned late from thence. Mattie took Ursula back and Edith Alice Ursula and Bernard called later. Julia went to the Agency office.

Friday 27

Ayrton left for Mrs Pyne's. Edith called.

Monday 30

Called on Mrs Nelson.

Tuesday 31

Allan's child born November 12. Julia went to Margate. Dined at Holroyd's. Received letter from Pat Stone to say that Lucy (once Job -- then Fielding) now Brenner, was at Birmingham.

Edith and Ayrton's baby Audrey born April 26
Agnes M Hicks boy (first) -- June 28
Harriet Henvey's fourth child, girl -- August 19

[Tucked inside the back cover are long press cuttings on the ‘Wild Fowl Protection Bill’ and
‘Zoology at the Royal Academy’.]

END
Diary, 1873

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1873. In this year she became 60, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 17 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

Devonshire butter – June 6th:
After milking, the milk stands in a somewhat deeper pan than I have usually seen it stand in – for 12 hours, or longer in winter. Then the milk, in the same pan, is placed on a stove at a gentle heat; in about three quarters of an hour the cream has a crinkled appearance, it is then set to cool, and in 8 or 10 hours in summer made into butter slices. The cream is skimmed off – the maker steeps her hands in water as hot as she can bear it, then into cold water, she turns over the then solid cream as if she were making pastry, pouring off any milk that comes from it; then pours cold water over it and turns it about again, pours off the water. This is repeated until the water poured off is pretty free from milk. The butter is then flattened against the bottom of the pan, and salt sprinkled on it; washed again; after, being rolled together; and then, dividing it into pounds or half pounds, dabbed hard again [with] a flat piece of wood with a handle at the back, which has been soaking all the time in cold water. This is held firmly in the left hand – the butter is thus got into shape. Devonshire cream is the cream skimmed off before being made into butter – in fact simmered cream.

January

Mattie’s address: Ko-gaku-rigou, Toranomon, Yedu

[Sometime in 1873 Mattie’s husband Will was appointed Professor of Physics and Telegraphy at the Imperial College of Engineering, Tokyo]

Wednesday 1

Julia went to Margate

[It seems that from September last year John and Louie had had a house at Margate, and that Julia went there to stay with them]

Sunday 5

Florrie and Kate called looking so radiant, but poor Florrie –

[Why ‘poor Florrie’?]

Tuesday 7

John brought Cleve to stay with me. Edith left with Ursula and baby for Stow upland, both are I fancy clever children: Ursula thoughtful, very quietly reflecting on all she sees.

[Ursula Chaplin being then just over 3 years old, her first cousin Cleve being seven]

Wednesday 8

Took Cleve to Miss Skinner’s to see Florrie and Kate, then to Mrs Whichcote’s whom he much amused with his pretty wit, and when asked if he could speak French said "a little" and then suddenly "oh Mama that reminds me I did not say my verb to you and then turning to Mrs Whichcote "can you tell me what cat always walks on two legs?" The Chat of Persia - his own riddle -- Then took him to the Albert Walk -- he was much struck by its vast size.

Thursday 9

Louis Napoleon*, ex-emperor of the French, died at Chiselhurst in Kent, born April 20th 1808. Cleve and I had early dinner at Mrs Pyne's -- called at the Evegards, weather very wet.

[*Napoleon III, also called (until 1852) LOUIS-NAPOLÉON, in full CHARLES-LOUIS-NAPOLÉON BONAPARTE nephew of Napoleon I, president of the Second Republic of France (1850-52), and then emperor of the French (1852-70). He gave his country two decades of prosperity under a stable, authoritarian government but finally led it to defeat in the Franco-German War (1870-71). He was the third son of Napoleon I's brother Louis Bonaparte, who was king of Holland from 1806 to 1810, and his wife, Hortense de Beauharnais Bonaparte, stepdaughter of Napoleon I.]

Friday 10

Went to Great Western Station to see Florrie and Kate off. Called with Cleve on Georgina. Cleve delighted with the contents of the first volume of Rollin's History. I lent it to him -- he was reading it eagerly.

Saturday 11

Called on Mme Celli. John took Cleve back to Margate. Julia returned home

Sunday 12

Will came in the evening, went with him to St George’s Hall to hear the Stabat Mater (as it appeared to me) not well done.

Wednesday 15

Went to London University, found that J. had passed. Looked at the collection of Reynolds, Gainsborough, Romney and other fine pictures at the Royal Academy. Napoleon lying in state dressed in the uniform he wore at Sedan, boots and all! An Egyptian mummy is poor compared to this absurdity. Sisters of Charity kneeling all the time in the attitude of prayer at his feet and a huge candle at each side of him.

[What had J passed?]

Thursday 16

Napoleon was buried at the Romanist chapel at Chiselhurst, his son aged 17 whom I reported like Charlie Celli at that age -- apparently much overcome by grief. Dined at Holroyd's, met Mr and Mrs Harry Holroyd, called on Miss L. Shurr.

Saturday 18

Holroyd went to Margate with John. Effie dined here.

Sunday 19

Holroyd at Margate, Effie and baby dined here. Will here.

Monday 20

Julia went to Highgate. I went to Wimbledon, saw Mr and Mrs Margetts and 4 younger children pleasant looking. Carry, Holroyd very agreeable. Miss H. much aged.

[The only earlier mention of Miss H (probably Sarah Holroyd) in the diary is on 22 July 1870. The entry also included a mention of the Pynes]

Thursday 23

Heard from India. I fear they will have trouble rearing the baby.

[Allan’s son Wyndham was born in November 1872 - in India]

Friday 24

Wrote to Allan. Worked at the drawroom(?) floor. Julia called on the Saltwells.

[Here is included a press cutting, undated and paper not named, about the funeral of The Rt Hon Edward George Bulwer Lytton, Baron Lytton of Knebworth in the county of Hertford, who died January 18th 1873, aged 67. Part of it reads:
The Chapel of St Edmund’s, where the body now reposes, has always been considered a semi-royal shrine; and Dean Stanley, in his work on the Abbey, says, “This chapel seems to have been regarded as of the next degree of sanctity to the Royal Chapel of St. Edward’s” (the Confessor’s). The names of the persons that lie [interred?] therein recall passages from our English history, some of which are so brilliantly described in the pages of the deceased novelist. Next to him is the tomb of Humphrey Bourchier, who figures in “The Last of the Barons,” and fell in the battle of Barnet. Around him lie Prince John, a son of Edward II.; Robert de Waldeby, Archbishop of York and tutor to Richard II; Nicholas Monck, Bishop of Hereford; Frances Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk; Edward Talbot; Earl of Shrewsbury; and that Lord Russell whose monument records that he was
Righte noble twyse by virtue and by birthe;
Of heaven lov’d and honoured on the earthe.
and, on the next page, another:
DEAN STANLEY AT CAMBRIDGE – CAMBRIDGE, SUNDAY EVENING
The Dean of Westminster preached before a very large congregation at the University Church this afternoon from Job xxviii, v. 7-8. The discourse bore upon the moral aspect of Christian theology, and was concluded by a graceful allusion to the late Dr Lushington, and to Professor Sedgwick, whose life hangs by a thread. The lives of these two venerable gentlemen were, said Dean Stanley, filled with burning enthusiasm for what was noblest and best in human kind, and the same humble and firm belief in what was holy, just and good, in the nature of God. Lives such as these confirmed his text.]

Saturday 25

Worked at floor, finished it.

Sunday 26

To St. Stephen's. J. went to church in the evening, no one came.

Monday 27

Called on Mrs Harry Holroyd. Received letter from Louie. Wrote to her. Julia dined at Mme Celli's.

[Mrs Harry Holroyd was probably Louisa, wife of Henry Holroyd, barrister, grandson of Sarah Holroyd née Chaplin, sister of Edward Chaplin (MAC’s father-in-law. Henry was about 53 but his wife was probably a lot younger for their marriage was in 1858]

Tuesday 28

Went to Oxford Street to buy Japanese paper curtains at 18/ a pair 9ft by 9ft 6in -- such a thing, paper curtains!!!

Wednesday 29

Johnny arrived in the evening, talking of Kkwa(?). Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 30

Received letters from Louie and from Will announcing offer to go to Japan. Wrote to Mattie. Will dined here. Holroyd came in the evening. J. went to evening party.

Friday 31

Florance, Kate and Miss Skinner dined here, brought little May who was ill with swollen gland. Julia went to Highgate. Letters from Allan. Weather cold. May slept here.

[Little May was Florance’s six year old daughter Florance May]

February

Saturday 1

Weather intensely cold with sleet and snow. Johnny took May back and returned to Margate. Called on Effie -- baby very well. Reading Zincke’s Egypt – a very improving volume.

Sunday 2

Holroyd called, also Clifton Curtis -- much snow. Will dined here -- talked of Japan, a promising scheme I think.

Monday 3

Julia translated Herr Althof's letter. Went out in the afternoon, snow on the ground but air pleasant and dry. Wrote to Louie.

[I have assumed up to now that Julia, so frequently mentioned, is MAC’s eldest daughter, born in 1837, so about 35 years old – she didn’t marry until 1886. But did she speak German? MAC’s niece Julia Ayrton probably did speak German, since her mother Emma, née Althof, was German, but according to Ayrton Chaplin’s annotation in Ann Mendell’s ‘Chaplin’ family book, that Julia Ayrton was only 6 years old in 1873. If she was born earlier this would help with another problem – the apparent 20 year gap between her date of birth and her brother’s date of birth]

Tuesday 4

At home all day. Very cold -- snow on the ground. Wrote to Edith.

Wednesday 5

Called at Ashley House, saw Florrie and Kate and Miss and Mr Skinner. Kate gave us tickets for Haymarket to see "The Wicked World," by Gilbert the artist -- very clever. We were a party of 12 -- Kate, Florrie, Effie and Holroyd, Mrs Davidson, Mr Skinner, Clifton, Henri Celli, and two Westbys. Clifton dined here - such a fog, we the cab driver could hardly find his way back.

[I think that Ashley House must have been Allan Maclean Skinner’s London home, so the first line above refers to him, his sister Marianne, and two daughters, Florance and Kate. Kate married Ashley Westby in 1876. Ashley House, near Westminster Cathedral, no longer exists.]

Thursday 6

Called on Mrs Nelson and Mrs Pyne, did not see her -- saw Miss James and Mr P. Wrote to Mrs Skinner.
[Miss James was probably Mary Anne James, and Mr P – Henry Pyne]

Saturday 8

At home all morning. Called at Effie's saw her father who had called here. Received note from Lucy. Reading Egypt under the Pharoahs and the Kl(?) -- very interesting.

[Effie’s father – Allan Maclean Skinner.]

Sunday 9

Kate and May came in the afternoon and slept at our house. Edward F came to tea

Monday 10

Lucy Bremner once Lucy Grel(?) our dear nurse came on her return from Australia where she went in 1851 with a husband very unworthy of her -- tho she has lost the pleasing beauty of her youth she has a presence and countenance quite above her birth, a sad clever countenance.

Tuesday 11

Received a telegram from J E H S. asking me to go to Margate as he has to go to Vienna for Daily News. Took Lucy to see Holroyd's child -- then came by train to Margate. Julia gone with Kate and May (?) and to Highgate. Found Louie and Cleve with colds.

[The reason for this request by J E H S becomes clear on the 22nd of the month.]

Wednesday 12

Both better. Weather very cold sea rough, wind NW (?).

Thursday 18

Cleve going to school daily.

Friday 14

Letter from Will with a very satisfactory report of his interview with the Japanese Ambassador.

Sunday 16

Went with Cleve to church, differ with the doctrine preached.

Monday 17

Cleve reading every evening for a short time with Atlas, Rollin's Ancient History then shutting and replacing the books literally flies about the room as lightly as a spirit making up his own history of Clearwell on the text of what he has read. When reading I observe he will turn many pages back now and then to refer just as an older person would, knowing exactly where to find what he wants, and I was surprised at his saying "how is this, they say Hannibal was 50 when he died -- and here (turns pages back) they say he lived to 49." He is also anxious to read all numbers of soldiers in armies correctly.


Wednesday 19

Letter from Allan on the way from Hashungabad [Hoshingabad or Hoshangabad - which?] to Trichinopoli suffering every misery from severe changes of weather on the journey. Wrote to him.

Thursday 20

Walked in the town with Cleve. Louie very well.

Friday 21

Walked into the town shopping for Louie. Received parcel from Julia. Cleve enchanted with an atlas of Holroyd's of the battles of the Romans -- and a classical dictionary with many woodcuts which I have given him. Louie very well.

Saturday 22

Louie’s baby girl born at 7:15 pm. Mrs Willie attended and all went on very well. The babe strong and well made. Telegraphed the event to Julia and wrote by same post to John and Mrs Skinner.

[The baby was Caroline Louisa Marianne Skinner. She married Mr Bickford-Smith in 1891.]

Sunday 23

Louie going on well. Cleve taken in to see his little sister, tears of joy occurring round his beautiful eyes and a sweet smile on his mouth gave to his face the loveliest loftiest expression one could imagine -- and would that I had had artistic power to transfer it to paper! To preserve it in any way! He said if he were its father instead of brother he could not love it more than he did -- if no one in the world liked the little darling he should "but everyone must love such a sweet little thing no one could hate a new baby who had never done any harm." In a few sentences he went far forward into the little ones life -- he always protecting loving and teaching his dear little sister.

Tuesday 25

Engaged much writing letters. Louie and child going on well.

Wednesday 26

Wrote to Maud and others. Ayrton and Edith thinking of going to Japan.

Friday 28

Received telegram to say Effie was taken ill last evening. Holroyd's second child, girl, born about eleven o'clock.

[My grandmother, Irene Kate Chaplin! – AR-J]

March

Saturday 1

Received telegram announcing birth of Effie's little girl at 11.30 last evening. Telegrams from John at St Petersburg.

Sunday 2

Went to afternoon church with Cleve and walked on the jetty.

Tuesday 4

Walked on the cliff in the afternoon with Cleve. Effie and Louie going on well

Wednesday 5

Louie on the sofa for the first time. Cleve went to the Willys. Sent Spectator to Allan. Long letter from Maud to Mrs S. about the journey to Trichinopoli.

[It is evident that Maud was in India. I have added to the Family tree that Wyndham was born in India.]

Thursday 6

Louie progressing. Weather stormy but bright.

Friday 7

Louie carried into the drawing room.

Sunday 9

Went to church in the afternoon with Cleve, called on Mrs Willy, saw her sweet little boy "Bertie."almost three years old, speaks perfectly with the prettiest voice.
[So it seems that Anna Cordelia Willy, née Skinner, sister of J E H S, lived in Margate at this time. Check 1881 census.]

Monday 10

Weather very stormy, walked out, not very well.

Tuesday 11

Julia came from London. Mrs Willy called.

[At this point is included a press report of part of a debate in the House of Commons on a Bill which ‘emancipates the University of Dublin from Trinity College and claims it for the whole Irish nation and their children’. It was opposed by the Conservative opposition and lost by a majority of three. Mr Gladstone said that it would be ‘laid aside for a moment’.]

Wednesday 12

Returned to London with Cleve. Weather cold. Went to see Effie and new baby. The upper part of the face resembles Louie's child. Dined in Crawford Street with Mattie and Will. Mattie had a note from Mr Stansfeld arranging about her presentation.

Thursday 13

Weather bad, walked in the ”Grove" with Cleve, bought him a hat. Difficult to find one large enough

Friday 14

Went early to Mattie -- to assist her to dress for the drawing room. The costume salmon pink under and grey train suited her. Then called on Mrs Nelson, Evegards and Pynes, - returned to Mattie, found Kate, Miss S, -- Florrie and B Wesby [or Wesley] waiting to see M -- who at half past five was glad to undress. I hope the presentation will be a good invention.

Saturday 15

At home. Went to see Effie.

Sunday 16

Went to St Stephen's with Cleve. Weather intensely cold. Miss Skinner brought May. Mattie dined here. Will came to tea. Holroyd joined us at supper when suddenly came in Mr and Mrs Wallace of Bexhill

Monday 17

Liberal Government resumed office. Disraeli unable to form a Tory one. I went with Mattie to purchase linen for Japan. Called on Effie found, her better.

Thursday 18

Mme Celli lunched here. Took Cleve and May to Kensington Museum -- he was much pleased with armour and begged May to examine "the gallant weapons" and then the ship models. Kate was here when we got home.

Saturday 22

Went with Cleve to see Lucy into the train to Margate. Called at Ashley House - then walked on the Thames Embankment to Charing X station - thence to Guildhall.

[Lucy presumably the former family nurse already mentioned above, now going to help Louie with her baby?]

Sunday 23

Went to St Stephen's with Holroyd and Cleve -- a wet morning. Will and Mattie dined here. C. Celli came in the evening. Will and Cleve called on Georgina. Mr Jay died.

Monday 24

Took Cleve to Westminster Abbey. Called on Mrs Norton and on Miss Shurrs - Miss S. is 96, 4th of this month, looking remarkably well.

Tuesday 25

May Steward came to stay here.

Friday 28

Took Cleve and May to the British Museum. He would not look at Roman antiquities but walked steadily through the Assyrian rooms and enquired of the official for the Carthaginian antiquities. May was pleased with the birds.

Saturday 29

The Oxford and Cambridge boat race, weather splendid. Cleve and May quite excited in favour of Cambridge. Mattie and Will came in the evening.

Sunday 30

Went to St Stephen's, walked in Kensington Gardens with the children.

[Was MAC still living at 60 Westbourne Pk Rd? The location of St Stephen’s might be a clue. Check it. Near Harrow Road (see below)?]

Monday 31

Kate came to fetch May. Weather mild and damp.

April

Tuesday 1

Cleve full of fun and April fools. Julia returned from Margate.

Wednesday 2

Went with Cleve to see Mrs Acton

Thursday 3

Dined at Mrs Pyne’s

Friday 4

Wrote to Allan. Called on Mattie.

Saturday 5

Mr Lenthall called. Holroyd left me and returned home to sleep. Weather cooler.

Sunday 6

Went to St Stephen's church. Walked with Cleve some distance up the Harrow Road. Kate, May, Miss Skinner and Captain Westby called -- wet evening.

[Captain Westby was the future husband of Kate Skinner – more than 15 years older than her.]

Monday 7

Took Cleve to Victoria Station to meet Kate, to return to Margate. The dear child was in an agony of grief at parting though delighted at the prospect of seeing his ‘(Dody)’ and his little sister. Called on Effie. Met Mme Celli and walked with her.

Wednesday 9

Effie and children went to Hasting.

[Maybe because the sea air might help a sick child. See entry for 15th]
.
Thursday 10

Mr Skinner and Kate dined here. Sent parcel by Whiteley’s to Maud. Holroyd went to Devonshire to see Mrs Skinner.

Friday 11

Not well. Edward called. Weather very cold dull and dry.

Saturday 12

Called on Mattie and Mrs Nelson.

Sunday 13 (Easter Day)

Went to St Stephen's. Mattie and Will dined here, walked with him to see Mme Celli. No Easter finery, all in winter costume save now and then a servant girl in gay attire.

Monday 14

Walked across the park to call on Mrs Whichcote. First warm weather.

Tuesday 15

Letter from Allan. Received a letter from Mrs Skinner saying that Effie's baby was dying, enclosed card from her to that effect. Went immediately to Hastings. Found baby pretty well. Returned home, called at Ashley House. Edith with Mrs Pyne and Ursula called in my absence. Weather warm.

Wednesday 16

Called on Mattie. Just returned from Bexhill. Edward better. Saw Octavia Saltwell. Mrs Nelson. Mrs Hollis very lady like sweet person all nonsense about aristocratic birth, she a baker's daughter, one of the best ladies I could find. Walked with Edith home. C. Celli called.

Friday 18

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 19

Dined at Mrs Pynes, met Mattie Merill, Helen Grenfell, Edith and Ayrton there.

Sunday 20

Went to St Stephen's. Julia went to the Pynes. Will and Mattie here.

Monday 21

Ayrton came with Ursula to stay here a few days.

Wednesday 23

Went to China sale in Regent Street

Friday 25

Ayrton went to Highgate with Ursula. Ellen much the same, at home all day with face ache

Saturday 26

Went with Mattie Merill to Regent Street, lunched with Mattie and went with her to see Miss Shurrs. Miss L. to give M an introduction to Lady Parkes who was their pupil. Mattie went to Nortons’. I came home.

Wednesday 30

Mr Perrey of Marden died.

May

Friday 2

Louie came to London with Cleve baby and Lucy. Baby suffering from vaccination. Mattie Merill dined here.

Saturday 3

With Mattie to buy wallpaper for Japan

Sunday 4

Mattie Merill lunched here

Monday 5

Mattie came about eight o'clock very tired, Will soon after. I took leave of her, coldly, I felt but a little less coldly I should have quite unnerved her and myself too. Hoped to forget my sorrow in sleep but could not sleep till daylight. Wrote to Mme Kergonard for Louie.

Tuesday 6

Will and Mattie left London at 7.30 am for Liverpool to sail in the Calabria to America for Japan via San Francisco. I walked with Cleve to their apartments to get letters and a box of preserved fruit from Frederick at Nice. Letter from him telling me of his serious illness.

Wednesday 7

Rain all afternoon

Thursday 8

Mrs Acton and Miss Sullivan lunched here. Louie and children with Lucy here. Received letter from Mme Kergonard -- she could not receive Louie.

[What a quick reply, if the letter was to France and back!]

Friday 9

Miss Adshead brought Nellie to dine here. Georgina, Anna and Kathleen came to tea. Mrs Whichcote called.

Saturday 10

Took Cleve to Westminster pier where we met Holroyd, who accompanied me to the Tower. Cleve took a most intelligent interest in all he saw. Louie dined here. Clifton called.

Sunday 11

Louie’s baby was baptised at St Stephen's Church by the names Catherine Louisa Mary Anne. Clifton Curtis and M A Skinner with Julia for Carry Skinner, sponsors. They took tea with me. Cleve like his father excitedly trying to amuse and please the guests. Lucy Brenner here with the infant -- Holroyd of the party. Effie and children at Hastings

Monday 12

Took Cleve to see St John's Gate and then to St Paul's -- where he saw a few monuments and then remained for afternoon prayers. Louie dined here

Wednesday 14

Dined with Louie. Miss James and Mr Skinner lunched here. Mrs E. Grenfell came in the afternoon. Effie and children returned from Hastings. Nugent looking very well and pretty baby thriving.

Thursday 15

Louie and little family started at 10am for Antwerp from the St Katherine's Wharf.

Friday 16

Went to Highgate. J Taylor and Miss Adshead taking a picnic together in Richmond Park. Weather rather cold but fine. Walked beside Ellen's chair to Muswell Hill. A lovely spot considering it is so near London. Holroyd came in the evening having his eye inflamed could not dine at Whichcotes with Effie.

[J Taylor’s first wife was Ellen Feild, daughter of Ann Chaplin and Samuel Feild. Ann Mendell wrote: “John Taylor worked for the British Museum and was involved with the move to South Kensington - Natural History I presume. They seem to have lived in Highgate, and MAC often goes to visit as does Julia. I do wonder what illness she (Ellen) had. After her death he marries Mary Adshead. They have 2 chilren, Dora and Harold. First child is Ellen like her mother. Seems to have been called Nellie”.]

Saturday 17

Mr Skinner called. Holroyd went to Bordman the occulist, eye better.

Sunday 18

To St Stephen's Church. Sermon for British Colombia missions. Acton called -- also Holroyd, Effie and C. Celli. E Feild dined here.

Monday 19

Went to Mudies and in search of coal office advertising cheap coal -- could not find it. Letter from Allan.

Tuesday 20

Telegram from J E H S from (?) - went to Ashley House. Called at Charing Cross for Allan, got him map of Chiva territory. Took parcel to Adie’s for Will. Mr Skinner, Charlie and Effie dined here. Went after dinner to Panorama of Overland to India.

Wednesday 21

Julia went to Highgate. Letter from J T groaning about income at Museum. Wrote to Mattie, sent letter also to Allan.

Thursday 22

Left London at 9.15 for Devonshire, arrived at Walland Carey at 8.20. Found Mrs Skinner better than I thought she could be often so much rheumatism. Only Carry and Clifton here.

Friday 23

Clifton left. Wrote, and sent a few primroses, the largest I have ever seen, to Julia. Walked with Carry through the woods towards the sea.

Saturday 24

Took a drive with Mrs Skinner through "The Hobby" a road cut in the wooded hill sloping down to the sea running round a coombe for two miles or more of continuous sylvan beauty.

Sunday 25

Went to the little Church of Buck's Cross, duty well performed. Clergyman Mr Kirman, a good man.

Monday 26

Weather cloudy. Went to see Mr Holderness’s school where Cleve went, a very fussy half educated but good man I think. Wrote to Julia.

Tuesday 27

Went with Carry to Buck's Mill, a picturesque lime mill close to the sea. A lovely walk, weather delightful, wind NW. Cold at night.

Wednesday 28

Letter from Julia. Went with Carry through the Hobby in a donkey cart -- and then on a donkey to "Gallantry bower" a magnificently wooded cliff 700 or 800 feet high in the grounds of Clovelly Court, the house of the Fanes.

Thursday 29

Letter from Cleve. Wrote to Mattie. Called on Mrs Kirwan, looked over interesting sketches of Cape and Mauritius. Walter Steward came. Reading Mrs Oliphant’s historical sketches of George 2nd’s time.

Friday 30

Wrote to Cleve and to Julia on a card. Walter and Clifton out for the day. Reading.

Saturday 31

Read Mrs Oliphant's sketches of musical persons of George 2nd’s time, walked and enjoyed the fine views. Letter from Julia.

June

Sunday 1 (Whit Sunday)

Went to Church with Clifton. Wet day. Letters from Julia and Holroyd. Wrote to Holroyd and Julia.

Monday 2

Fine day for the holiday folks. Read. Walked on the hills. Walter Steward left. Received letter from Agnes who has been ill.

Tuesday 3.

Walked. Read. Wrote to Mattie and Agnes. Arnold on the American war of 1780, a signal instance of valour and treachery arrangement with Clinton so to dispose his forces on West Point .that Clinton may have an easy victory.

Wednesday 4

Received first letters from Will and Mattie, just landed at New York. Letter from Louie, Mrs Curtis very ill, baby poorly but better. Lunched at Reverend Mr Kirwan's - drove in evening. Wrote to Louie.

Thursday 5

Wrote to Maud. Went to temperance meeting at Mr Holderness’s with Clifton. Sorry to see a movement which has much merit mixed up with so much silly ostentation and appealing so much to the lowest part of the character. 5 or 7 o'clock sat down to tea at 8 pence per head.

Friday 6

Nugent's birthday. Called on Mrs Kirwan. Saw Devonshire butter made. Left Walland Cary by post trap for Barnstaple, one old man was very sceptical about Good Temperism, said it wasn't right to deprive a man of his pint ‘o beer -- get him to pay 8 pence for his tea -- he should like to know who got the profit out of it all, there was a deal of skulking and Judasing somewheres - he won't say where.

Saturday 7

On to Exeter where I slept. Saw the cathedral in the morning -- small -- got to London at half past five. Went to Holroyd's -- Nugent's birthday party. Kate came to stay here with Lillian. Capt B Westby and Florrie dined here, all went to the Prince of Wales theatre

[This is odd. Kate married Capt Ashley George Westby. So did he have another first name beginning with B or a brother who was also a captain? It is always Florrie with him, yet he married Kate and Florrie was already married, to Walter Steward. Something wrong here]

Sunday 8

Went to Church at St Stephen's. Effie's Baby christened "Irene Kate." Colonel Basley, Josephine Blake and Kate Skinner sponsors, had tea at Holroyd's. Josephine came here.

Monday 9

Wrote to Mrs Skinner.

Tuesday 10

J E H. S arrived from Brussels. Louie Cleve and Babe well.

Thursday 12

Went to shops for Mrs Skinner, called on Mrs Nelson. Henry Hindley died at Jersey. Frederick came to London.

Friday 13

Wrote to Mattie. John Skinner went to Devon to see his mother. Kate staying here with Lilian. Heard of Henry Hindley’s death in the evening. Called on Miss L. Shurr.

Saturday 14

Called on Mrs Pyne. Wrote to Ayrton. Went with Kate, Julia and H. Celli to see French comedy and farce.

Sunday 15

Went to St Stephen's, a fine sermon on Christ's charge to his disciples. "Hospital" Sunday, £400 collected at that Church and £480 only at St Paul's, which was full from end to end. Went to Kew Gardens with Holroyd, Effie, boy and Lilian. Acton called.

Monday 16

Received letters from Ayrton and J E H S and Mrs S who liked the purchases. A note from Mr Badger telling me of poor Frederick's marriage and of his serious illness. Went to see him, very ill and suffering miserably, my heart aches to think of him. I fear medical treatment cannot cure him. Some French doctor bled and blistered him terribly at Vichy. Mrs Harlin called and Colonel Basley.

[‘Frederick’ in this entry is her brother (died 20 June), he married in 1833 and his wife is described below as ‘kind and attentive,’ so why the mention of his marriage?]

Tuesday 17

Went to see Frederick, still suffering, able to take only ice and turtle soup. His wife kind and attentive.

Wednesday 18

Frederick worse, breathing more difficult, and he very restless, appetite quite gone, always unable to lie down.

Thursday 19

The difficulty of breathing not quite so great but he is very restless, at twelve o'clock said he felt a little easier, enquired kindly after all when I left him; as he fancied he was better with only two in the room, his wife and valet. Mr Badger left him shortly before me.

Friday 20

At four o'clock this morning Mr Badger came to tell me Frederick was released from all his pain and misery at half past two -- he passed away quietly. I went to Arundel Gardens. His face still bore traces of suffering especially the eyebrows. J E H Skinner arrived. I wrote to Mattie

Monday 23

Received kind letters of sympathy from friends -- called on Mr Badger

Tuesday 24

Walked to Kensal Green, saw the grave that was to receive the body of my amiable affectionate generous-hearted brother -- it is North East of the chapel and near to it. Ayrton came from Stow upland.

Wednesday 25

Holroyd, Ayrton, J E H Skinner and Acton met here to attend the funeral. Mr Badger, Charles Hicks, the doctor and Lord Stanley of Alderley also attended. Ayrton returned home. Received letter from Mattie. Mrs Whichcote and Mr and Mrs Blacklock called.

Thursday 26

Went to Bexhill. Edward better. Got home late. Mrs Pyne called.

[At this point is inserted a press cutting headed VALUABLE BEQUEST TO THE BRITISH MUSEUM: “We are informed that Mr Frederick Ayrton, barrister-at-law and long resident at Cairo, who died in London last week, has bequeathed to the British Museum a splendid library of caligraphic writings in Arabic, Persian, and Turkish, collected during many years' residence in Egypt, and the market value of which probably exceeds £3000. Mr F. Ayrton was a perfect connoisseur in the Oriental science of caligraphy, of which so little is known, artistically, in Europe; and he devoted time and money, without stint, to this his favourite study. That fact alone enhances the value of his collection, which is, perhaps, unrivalled in Europe. The bequest is made on condition that the trustees set apart a room in the Museum for the exhibition of these specimens of Oriental caligraphy, and that Mr Ayrton's Arabic scribe, Asaád Effendy, be engaged for three or four years, at a salary of £100 per annum, to draw up a catalogue raisonnée of the contents of each series, the testor generously providing for the past services of his favourite Shaikh by a special legacy.]

Friday 27

Wrote to Allan. Called on Mrs Nelson. Mrs Norton called, also Mr Skinner and Carry. Letter from Louie

Saturday 28

Called on Mrs Harlin and saw her three children. The eldest, a girl of 5, looked hard at me, then embraced me with many kisses. Wrote to Louie and Ayrton.

Sunday 29

Went to St Stephen's. Acton, S. Feild and Edward called. Rained hard all afternoon so that they remained some time.

Monday 30

Called on Mrs Williams and Mrs Rollings in Queen Anne Street. Fred and Florance looked very ill. All genial and enquired after Mattie. Julia dined at Mme Celli's.

[Who are Fred and Florance?]

July

Tuesday 1

Went to Bracebridges. Wrote to Mattie.

Wednesday 2

Called on Carry Skinner, Mrs Dixon and Mrs Pyne.

[Mrs Dixon, wife of John Bond Dixon, was born Elizabeth Maria James, and was sister of Harriet James (Mrs Henry Pyne), Ayrton Chaplin’s mother-in-law.]

Thursday 3

Went with watch to Bracebridges. In the afternoon down Talbot Road. Letter from Miss Stephenson as to Agnes’s illness. Wrote to Agnes. Sent papers to Allan.

Friday 4

Working in the morning. Called on Miss L. Shurr. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 5

Called on Holroyd early and on Georgina. Received letters from Caroline, wrote to Emilia Ellis.

Sunday 6

Went to St Stephen's. Acton called and Mrs Dixon and (?). Holroyd, Effie and boy dined here.

Monday 7

Mrs Pyne called. Called on Mrs H. Holroyd, saw Mary Louisa Wickham, Frederick Wickham’s eldest daughter very like him

Tuesday 8

Received tickets from Mrs Rollings for Botanic Fete. Sent them to Mrs H. Holroyd. Went to Highgate, saw very picturesque ruins of the Alexandra Palace illuminated. Ellen not better. Mme Celli dined here.

Wednesday 9

Holroyd not well. Received tickets from Acton for Botanic Fete, took them to Mrs H. Holroyd -- found she had not received the first sent by post. Wrote to Secretary of Post Office about it. Julia left in the evening for Havre to join Louie at Etretat. Miss James called.

[Louisa Fanny Holroyd, Mary Anne James]

Thursday 10

Letter from Ann. Dined at Mrs Pyne's, met there Mrs A Grenfell. Letter from Allan. Wrote to Ann and Mattie.

Friday 11

Called on Mrs Henry Slade, Wyndham Place, - those old London houses have an unwholesome smell. Holroyd’s dog flew at me -- these big animals are dangerous to life. Posted letters to Mattie via America, also to Allan. Mrs Nelson and Pauline called.

Saturday 12

Went to see the water colours at Pall Mall, good things by Israel Hagler Bouvier Telb(?) and Warren in different styles. Then on to Mrs Whichcote who had a rough Scotch lady with her whose roughness made her wince a little. Holroyd went to Bexhill, all well. Received letter from Julia at Etretat.

Sunday 13

Went to St Stephen's, Mr Rowsell.vehement against the creeping in of Romanist doctrines. Wet all-day. Wrote to Julia and to Edith.

Monday 14

Wrote to Effie and Clifton. Walked to Notting Hill, looked at houses. Holroyd came in evening. Sent receipt for legacy. Weather cool.

Tuesday 15

At home all morning. Walked to house agents, looked for houses for Holroyd. He came in the evening.

Wednesday 16

Letters from Effie and Ayrton. Went to Royal Academy, met Edward F, Charlie and Mrs Norton. Stayed there until nearly seven o'clock. Mrs Whichcote called. Letter from Allan to Maud.

Thursday 17

Went to The Villas to see the Baby. Edward Feild and Holroyd dined with me. Sent newspaper to Allan (?) June with caricature of A in it. Weather cool and stormy.

[A being Acton]


Friday 18

Went to the International (poor), dined at Mrs Whichcote’s, met her Mrs Tatham and eldest girl, pretty, played well and talked unaffectedly.

Saturday 19

Wrote to Julia. Called on Mrs Nelson. Dined at Pynes’ with Holroyd, met Henveys -- Mary P Edith Constance and Ursula who was charming.

Sunday 20

To church at St Stephen's, a gent called who did not leave his name, thought it was Mr Badger so went there -- not he -- talked of intended monument to Frederick. Wrote to Mattie.

Monday 21

Went early to meet Edith at Royal Academy. Lunched at Mrs Pyne's, then went to see Florance Steward’s portrait at Leslie's house -- he has put the countenance at least one turn of it very fairly on canvas, but her colouring is wanting. Letter from Agnes asking me there. Posted letter to Mattie. Holroyd came in evening.

Tuesday 22

Went to Dunstable to see Agnes, found her looking ill and in bed. Baby Freddie a healthy child, well-developed in body and in mind, unusually intelligent, altogether a very charming child.

[Agnes, daughter of MAC’s brother Frederick. Her baby, Frederick Cyril Nugent Hicks, became Bishop of Lincoln. MAC was right about his intelligence. How could she tell, at under a month old?]

Wednesday 23

Dunstable a nice healthy Place, the garden very pretty in its flowery luxurious, the Irish yews along the border of the lawn very pretty. The house has a friendly homely aspect - perhaps with doctors as with parsons the master is of the household - not in at certain stated times -- this breaks all form - and the necessary irregularity at the doctors at once waives off all ceremony.

Thursday 24

Returned to London. Sorry to leave Agnes and dear child -- well-trained children are the angels of this world. Found various letters from Julia.

Friday 25

Having strained the muscle of my leg could not go out, so wrote letters all day, to Allan, Mrs Skinner and others. Mrs Pyne and Edith called in the evening. Holroyd dined with me.

Saturday 26

Worked, walked, wrote to Mattie. Received letter from Cleve boldly written and long, about the field of Waterloo. Charlie Celli called. Read Waverley.

Sunday 27

Edith came, went to St. Thomas’s. Constance Pyne dined here

Wednesday 30

Edith, Ursula, baby and nurse came to stay. Went with Edith to Bethnal Green Museum to see the fine collection of Sir R Wallace's pictures -- fine sketches and watercolours of horses crossing water by Decamps.

Thursday 31

Edward called

August

Saturday 2

To Kensington Museum with Edith and Ursula. Holroyd went to Colonel Bayley’s and to join Effie. Went to Kensall Green Cemetery with Edith and Ursula, enquired for a man to buy the big dog. Ada Dixon called -- Acton called to tea.

[Colonel Bayley – see file of letters ‘To_Effie’]

Sunday 3

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Mme Celli. Wrote to Louie.

Monday 4

Edith went to see Mary, - stayed at home with Ursula. Mrs Pyne dined here.

Tuesday 5

Edith, Audrey and nurse went to Shirley near Ashbourne. I walked with Ursula, tried to find the man to buy the dog. Rained heavenly.

Wednesday 6

Received letter from Ayrton asking me to go to Shirley soon -- so went to Pantechnicon there to sell dog. Wrote to Ayrton, Mrs Skinner and Effie. Nurse caught cold.

Thursday 7

Left by Midland Railway for Ashbourne, pretty road to Derby. Changed there for Rosceter, change again for Ashbourne. Ayrton met us – Ursie very glad to see him.

[Ayrton was presumably on holiday, perhaps a locum for the Vicar?]

Friday 8

Walked with Ayrton, Edith, Constance and children. Read that part of life of Ampère the man of science that relates to his and his wife's mutual love, so soon broken off by death. Servant rather rebellious about cooking venison.

Saturday 9

Walked with A, E, Constance and children. Worked. Acton resigned. Daily News silent on the subject.

[Find out more about Acton’s resignation – try index to Times for this month. He is about to become Judge Advocate General, see the press cutting below.]

Sunday 10

To Shirley church, a good sermon expressing the spirit of Christianity from Ayrton. Again in the evening, on the woman of Samaria.

Monday 11

Wrote to Mrs Whichcote, Octavia Saltwell, Mattie. Posted the letters at Ashbourne where we drove into the afternoon. Reading. Received letters from Louie and Holroyd.

Tuesday 12

Acton - Judge Advocate General.

Wednesday 13

Walked and wrote letters.

Thursday 14

Edith, Ayrton and Constance went to Dove Dale. Walked out with baby. Wrote to Allan and Octavia Saltwell.

Friday 15

Went to Buxton to see Octavia Saltwell with Mabel Tatham who met me at station -- drove to Duffield Station. Wrote to Louie. Wrote and sent cheque to J E H S at Liverpool. Returned Railway Scrip to Irving and Slade.

Saturday 16

Went to Public Gardens. Left Buxton the belle of Derbyshire with Octavia Saltwell and Mabel and got to Shirley at seven o'clock

[At this point a cutting from the Spectator of August 16, 1873:
"Mr Ayrton has, it is said, accepted the office of Judge-Advocate-General, and all the world is sneering at Mr Gladstone, who fills an office he intended to abolish with a man incompetent to perform its duties. We have always thought the abolition of the office just because the deputy was competent one of those hasty things governments sanction in an economical fit, and we can testify that there is no blunder as to the present selection. Probably no official in England is quite as competent to the office -- which might be made one of high importance if its holder could look straight in the eyes of the Duke of Cambridge -- as Mr Ayrton is. He must have every detail of it at his finger-ends. For years he was the fighting advocate of the Bombay Army, engaged in every court-martial, -- first, to defend the accused, and secondly, to make the lives of the ignorant officers who preside over those tribunals a perpetual burden to them. If he chooses to hold the office -- not yet certain -- he will in six months do more to smash up Horse-Guards abuses than all that the declaimers in the country. With the law behind him, Mr Ayrton is on military questions just the most formidable foe the unjust could have."]

Sunday 17

Went to church. After dinner walked with Octavia Saltwell in Ednaston Park. Church in evening.

Monday 18

Octavia Saltwell and Mabel Tatham left with Constance. Wrote to Edward. Letter from J E H S. Did not go out as it rained. Wrote to Holroyd.

Tuesday 19

Rained nearly all-day. Did not go out. Reading life of Grote, badly done by Mrs Grote. Letter from Mme de Molin(?) to Julia.

Wednesday 20

Received letters from Mattie, arrived at Japan, also from Holroyd, Julia, Louie and Cleve.

Thursday 21

Mrs Pyne, Constance, Ayrton and Edith went to Alton Towers. Walked with children through park. Wrote to Mattie, omitted number. Wrote to Cleve with Mattie's letters to J and L enclosed.

[Press cutting: Whitehall, August 21: “The Queen has been pleased to direct Letters Patent to be passed under the Great Seal granting the office and place of Advocate-General or Judge-Marshal of her Majesty's Forces to the Right Hon Acton Smee Ayrton -- Gazette.]

Friday 22

Reading life of G Grote, a fine character. Ayrton drove me and Mrs Pyne through the park passing through woods, a stifling unpleasant sensation.

Saturday 23

Went to Dove Dale with Ayrton, Edith, Mrs Pyne. Received letter from Mrs Nelson. Wrote to Miss L Shurr.

Sunday 24

Ayrton preached good sermons which by an ordinary preacher would be tediously spun out, by his brevity he secures the attention of the uneducated and uncritical.

Thursday 28

Left Shirley with Edith and Ursula, having travelled in five different trains, I parted with them at Rugby where they went to see Helen. I came on home and found Louie, Baby and Cleve. Baby much improved. Cleve rather thin. Julia and Louie well.

Friday 29

Louie and children went to Devonshire. Wrote to Allan.

Sat 30

I went to see a house for Mme Celli. Received a note from Agnes who is at Hereford Sq., en route for the seaside.

Sunday 31

Went with Julia to see Agnes who was in bed, her boy charming healthy and intelligent. Remained all day with her.

September

Monday 1

Went to Stowupland. Stopped to lunch at Colchester with Louisa Barton Lodge -- found her very ill in her room. Went with Mr Lodge to the Castle Museum, then on to Stowupland, pouring rain all-day - and in torrents when I arrived, but Ayrton met me at the station.

Tuesday 2

Went to see the new building and tried to lay out the grounds to advantage. Wrote to Mattie.

Wednesday 3

Letter from Mattie about Yedo and their new dwelling.

Thursday 4

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 6

Walked with Ayrton, Edith and Ursula across the meadows.

Sunday 7

Went to Stowupland Church, good sermon, rained in the afternoon.

Monday 8

Returned to London. Letter from Louie. Holroyd came in the evening having returned home last week (Monday).

Tuesday 9

Letter from Allan. Holroyd dined here. I went to see Miss Shurr, talked about Mrs Grote -- who she says has a fine generous nature. She gave me a Wedgwood Medallion of Charles Fox. Weather wet and cold.

[Charles James Fox: Britain's first foreign secretary (1782, 1783, 1806), a famous champion of liberty, whose career, on the face of it, was nevertheless one of almost unrelieved failure. He conducted against King George III a long and brilliant vendetta; for this reason he was almost always in political opposition and, in fact, held high office for less than a year altogether. He achieved only two important reforms, steering through Parliament a resolution pledging it to abolish the slave trade speedily and, in the 1792 Libel Act, restoring to juries their right to decide not merely whether an allegedly libellous article had, in fact, been published but also what constituted libel in any given case and whether or not a defendant was guilty of it.]

Wednesday 10

Charlie Celli and young de Molin(?) dined here. Holroyd came in the evening.

Thursday 11

Went to Hanway Street for frame to Medallion of Charles Fox. Effie and Nugent returned to London. Holroyd came late. Read Andersson’s book about Lions.

Friday 12

Received card from Louie. Received present from Allan. Wrote to Allan, card to Miss L. Shurr. Mrs F.Ayrton died at Margate.

[Mrs F Ayrton, - Margaret Hicks, mother of Agnes Nugent Hicks, née Ayrton. I assume that Agnes’s husband Dr Charles Hicks was a cousin, but I don’t have the connection.]

Saturday 13

Went to International. Heard lecture on cookery by Buckmaster who is not much educated but sufficiently enthusiastic to be very useful in teaching the people that there are more useful and economical ways of preparing food than roast and boiled.

Sunday 14

Received a note from Mr Badger telling me of the death of Mrs F Ayrton. Holroyd and Effie with Nugent dined here.

Monday 15

Went to International with Emily -- heard lectures on cookery which are profitable and economical, returned home to dinner.

Tuesday 16

Letter from Will and Mattie.

Wednesday 17

Mrs F Ayrton was buried. I called on Effie. Sent letter to Mattie via Southampton.

Thursday 18

Wrote to Mattie.

Friday 19

Wrote to Acton.

Saturday 20

Engaged in the house. Wrote to Mrs Nelson and Louie. De Molier called. Wrote to Mrs B. Lodge.

[This is the third mention of De Mol… I don’t think I have the spelling correctly.]

Sunday 21

Went to St Stephen’s, dined with Holroyd, called on Mme Celli.

Monday 22

Received pictures and magazine from Mattie and Will.

Tuesday 23

Looked for lodgings for Kate. Engaged in the house.

Wednesday 24

Engaged in the house. Mrs Pyne called with Harriett and Alice’s fine boys. Willie Henvey is a fine bold boy. Both seem clever but quite unlike. Sent newspaper to Mrs Nelson.

Thursday 25

Wrote to Mattie. Sent her "Scotsman" also newspaper to Allan. Called in Monmouth Road on Kate. While waiting her arrival Miss Skinner came, presently arrived Florrie and all her five fine children so pretty and graceful.

Friday 26

Went to Highgate. Ellen weaker.

Saturday 27

Louie Cleve and Carina with Lucy Brenner came from Mrs Skinner's having slept last night at Exeter. Mrs Harlin called

Sunday 28

Went to St Stephen's Church with Cleve. Louie’s children, Florrie's and Holroyd's all assembled at Holroyd's, looking lovely all together and enjoying their play in the garden with the Westbys. Florrie and children had tea with us. Went to the International with Ottie Henry and Cleve then to Kensington Museum. Louie dined with Holroyd. Acton came in the evening.

Tuesday 30

Received letter from Allan.

October

Wednesday 1

Ottie and Henry dined here and I took them and Cleve to see the panoramic pictures of the route across America to San Francisco -- very well (?). Boys had tea here. Met Effie much disturbed, had dropped her purse containing £8.

[A slip of paper inserted here, undated, part of a letter: …. Ursie was much interested today with the question of the doll’s loving, and reasoning there from what it was in us that loved, as the doll had a body as well as us, so we didn’t love with our bodies, and the doll had a head as well as us so we didn’t love with our heads – then what was it we loved with. She now comes very willingly to her reading. Ever yours, ..]

Thursday 2

Mrs Pyne came to lunch with Willie Henvey and Bernard Grenfell, the boys played with Ottie and Henry. Received letters from Will and Mattie. J E H S came in the evening. Sent newspapers to Allan and Mattie.

Friday 3

Ellen Taylor came from Highgate with Nellie and Miss Adshead. Kate, Florrie, Effie and all the children came to tea -- Ten children, from Ottie 9 years old to Carina and Irene seven months, who were laid on the floor kicking and now and then prettily caressed by those of two or three. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 4

Louie and Cleve left by early train for Margate. Lucy and baby followed in the evening.

Sunday 5

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd and Effie took tea here with Nugent. Called on Mme Celli.

Monday 6

At home working. Julia lunched at Mrs Pyne's. I dined there. Received note from Louie telling of their arrival at Margate. Called on the Evegards, heard of Cosmo Howard’s marriage.

Tuesday 7

Called at Kate's lodging.

Wednesday 8

Kate came, brought Lilian. Went to the Lyceum with Holroyd Kate and Effie to see Irving play Richelieu which he did well.

Thursday 9

Wrote to Mattie, walked with Lilian.

Friday 10

Lent newspaper to Allan. Went to see Miss L. Shurr. Miss Shurr not so well as usual. Julia went to Highgate. Florance came and took back with her little Lilian. Talked to J E H S across the lines at the Queens Road Station.

Saturday 11

Walked to Notting Hill, called on Mrs W. Knight and Mrs Lebèque-- and home. Ordered frame for medallion of C Fox. Holroyd came to breakfast. Sir J Landseer buried in St. Paul's Cathedral

Sunday 12

Holroyd went to Ireland. Rained all day. Effie and Nugent dined here. E Feild called.

Monday 13

Went with Julia to station for Birmingham, then called on Mrs Nelson, then on Pynes -- saw Harriett Henvey and her husband. Letters from Agnes, Louie and Allan.

Tuesday 14

Walked across Kensington Gardens, a lovely day -- called on Mrs Whichcote then walked to Ashley House. Florrie and all gone to Brighton. Effie dined here.

Wednesday 15

Went with Effie to Bauerle to see portrait he is painting of Effie and Nugent -- quite idealised both though of course resembling by no means exact portraits. Mr and Mrs May and child dined here and Nugent. Wrote to Louie and Julia and Ann F. Letter from Julia

Thursday 16

Went with Mrs Skinner to see the "The Happy Land." The fun is poor.

Friday 17

Received letter from Cleve and Louie, baby poorly. Dined at Mrs Pyne's, met Colonel Rawling who has just been to Paris, looked in at Bazame’s court martial, not many persons there. Wrote to Maud and to Allan. Wrote to Edith.

Saturday 18

Called at the bureau re Mme Celli. Went to Effie's. Letter from Julia, not well.

Sunday 19

Went to St. Stephen’s. Effie dined here. Harriett -- Frederick Henvey took tea here. Wrote a note to Julia, Read Carlyle’s latterday pamphlet.

Monday 20

Received letters from Anne, Mrs Rollings, Mattie -- dated September 2nd and 7th. Called on Mrs Nelson. Sent books to Edith.

Tuesday 21

Received letters from Allan -- Ayrton -- J E H S.

Thursday 23

Sent letter to Mattie. Went to Brighton to visit Agnes.

Tuesday 28

Received letters from Allan.

Thursday 30

Returned from Brighton with Agnes and her dear little boy. J E H S came to dinner and slept here.

Friday 31

Julia returned from Birmingham. J E H S returned to Margate. Wrote to Allan. Called on Agnes, out, saw baby.

November

Saturday 1

Dined with Acton, Agnes there. Called on Miss Shurr en route. Julia did not go. Mr and Mrs Goldring Bird called.

Sunday 2

Whether extremely wet, went to church. Agnes and Acton came in the evening, also E Feild

Monday 3

Letter from Allan. Maud very poorly. Mrs Thorne called. I called on the Saltwells and Mrs Nelson.

Tuesday 4

Received letters from Will and Mattie. Weather very wet. Called on Ann.

Wednesday 5

Mrs Pyne called about Ayrton while I was meditating on his letter to me. Telegraphed to him and went to Mrs P’s in the evening.

Thursday 6

Wrote to Mattie also to Edith with Mattie's letter to her. Wrote to Mrs S. Weather very wet.

Friday 7

Ann and S. Feild dined with us.

Saturday 8

Dined at Acton's with Julia. Holroyd and Effie dined there.

Sunday 9

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd Effie and child dined here -- very wet.

Monday 10

Wet all day. Called on Ann, ill with cold.

Tuesday 11

Bad cold. Julia went to Highgate. I went to School Agents for A. Received letters from India. Sent parcel of baby’s coats from J E H S. Hat etc from self to India.

Wednesday 12

Wrote to Ayrton and sent schools’ circular.

Thursday 13

Mr Skinner came to lunch. Mme Celli dined here. Received letter from Dr Drysdale to forward to Mattie. Called at 21 and brought Nugent to play here a little.

Friday 14

Wrote to Allan. Mr Skinner called. Julia called on Saltwells. Ellen Knight and her sisters called. Samuel Feild called and talked over the sad quarrel with J. Taylor. J E H S came late.

Saturday 15

Walked to Camden Hill to look at houses for H. Saw one like Mahomet’s coffin over the railway suspended in mid air, very little ground rent asked! Joseph (?) poor Frederick's valet called. Acton called. J E H S returned to Margate.

Sunday 16

Went to see Holroyd then to Ann’s in Queens Road -- with her to St. Stephen's Church. Ann came after dinner. W Clifford called.

Monday 17

Rode to Berners Street then walked to Mrs Nelson's and on to the Pynes to dinner. Talked over Ayrton's new arrangements. Received letter from Agnes reporting serious illness of her dear child. Wrote to her.

Tuesday 18

Received letters from Allan and Mattie, wrote to Louie, Florrie -- forwarded letters of Mattie’s to Agnes. Wrote to Dr Drysdale. Looked at houses for Holroyd. Called on Georgina. Ann called here. Wrote to Ayrton about schools.

Wednesday 19

Went to Mrs Pyne’s about letter from Ayrton.

Thursday 20

Wrote to Mattie and Will. Walked. to Kensington. Read Bressante. Mrs Whichcote called. Miss Sullivan came to lunch. Ann called.

Friday 21

Julia lunched at the Pynes. I went to Highgate. Ellen losing the use of her hands. Little Nellie sang prettily. I stayed late to see John Taylor hoping I might arrange the quarrel between him and his father in law.

Saturday 22

Called on Samuel and Ann to try and make peace but could see any means of doing so -- each party feeling sore and insulted and delighting to bark and bite.

Sunday 23

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd called -- also Ann, Samuel, Edward and Charles Celli.

Monday 24

Received letter from Louie, wrote to her and to Cleve to answer the dear child's note to me written in a pretty little running hand. Walked to Leymont Place to take an agonising boot to be stretched -- may it be done!

Tuesday 25

Ayrton came to early dinner -- went with him to Scholastic Agency office -- then he went to Bradford about a school. Heavy fog came on. Mrs Pyne brought Ursula. Letter from Allan giving bad accounts of his baby and Maud. Dined with Effie.

Wednesday 26

Walked with Ursula to see Ann. Letter from Louie. Card from Kate saying that Mattie and Will were appreciated by the English at Japan. Long and well written letter from Cleve.

Thursday 27

Went to Waverley Road Schools to record my vote.

Friday 28

Went with Ayrton to Mrs Pyne’s. On my return found a telegram from Mr Wallis announcing the death of my dear brother Edward, one of the exalted souls of this world, always striving after the welfare of others.

Saturday 29

Went to Bexill with Holroyd, saw his marble-looking very handsome head so majestic in the calm of death. I felt thankful that he was removed from all his perplexities out of which we could see no escape. Mrs Pyne came and Kate -- Ayrton left with Ursula.

[What I wonder were his perplexities, other than his poor health? No mention here of his wife.]

Sunday 30

Went to St. Stephen's. Miss Skinner called. Florrie came in as brilliant as usual. Holroyd and Effie came.

December

Monday 1

Went to Mrs Pyne’s about buying mourning.

Tuesday 2

Went with Mrs Pyne to buy mourning at Civil Service.

Wednesday 3

Making mourning

Thursday 4

Wrote to Will to tell him of his dear Father's death.

Friday 5

Wrote to Allan about his Uncle Edward

Sunday 7

Went to St. Stephen's

Monday 8

Pauline Dardis called.

[Who was Pauline Dardis? Connection here with Nugents?]

Tuesday 9

Walter Clifford and John Sharp came to dinner. Edward, H and C Celli came in the evening. Holroyd came later.

Thursday 11

Working all morning. Dined at Holroyd's, met Mr and Miss Skinner and Colonel Williams of Allan's regiment -- talked the usual commonplaces. Holroyd read aloud Cleve's letter on American and Cuban and Ashanti wars, two sheets closely written. Intensely foggy and cold.

Friday 12

Having taken cold remained in bed, not well. Still foggy. Letters from Allan and Louie and Edith. Julia dined with Ann and Samuel. Holroyd came in the evening. Effie at Sevenoaks with Nugent.

Saturday 13

Better, and up in time to receive Colonel Williams and his two little boys to luncheon. Weather less foggy.

Sunday 14

Did not go to church. Little Nugent came as Holroyd and Effie were at Beckenham. Charlie Celli came to supper.

Monday 15

Letter from Mattie dated 15th through Hong Kong dated on postmark October 20th. Julia went to meet Cleve from Margate. We called on Ann.

Tuesday 16

Julia took Cleve to see Mrs Nelson.

Wednesday 17

Took Cleve to the British Museum -- took much interest in all he saw.

Thursday 18

Went to see the Miss Shurrs. The old lady wonderfully well.

Friday 19

Took Cleve to the Soane Museum -- he was much interested in the Mr Bonomi’s explanation of the hieroglyphics on the Sarcophagus. Louie came from Margate. Ottie and Henry came.

Saturday 20

All except Julia who was better occupied went with the children to Sanger’s Circus. The spectacular piece on fair Rosamund who is not poisoned, on which Cleve observed as that was done wrong he supposed Becket would be done wrong.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's with the boys. Florrie, Kate, Miss S. and Ann called.

Monday 22

Went with Cleve and Ottie to the Kensington Museum from eleven o'clock till half-past four. The boys much interested in the ship models and arms and armour, and less so in buildings, did not care for portraits. Louie returned to Margate. Edith and Ayrton called.

Tuesday 23

Called with the boys at Ashley House. Florrie and Kate returned to luncheon. Mrs Nelson called and I called there in the afternoon. Ayrton called. Wrote to Barton Lodge on the death of his wife.

Wednesday 24

Went to Margate with Cleve. Found baby grown a very fine intelligent child. Holroyd came by next train.

Thursday 25

Louie Johnny Holroyd Cleve and the two Miss Barnes’s were the party to dinner. The Miss Bs sang to the guitar during the evening.

Friday 26

At Margate. Holroyd left for London

Saturday 27

At Margate.

Sunday 28 to Wednesday 31

At Margate.

[THE WASTE OF FOOD -- at the Cookery School, a day or two ago, Mr Buckmaster produced a large heap of bread which he had picked up in the Hyde-park, with remnants of joints, sufficiently good to provide 20 or 30 persons with a good dinner. He said he did not want his audience to indulge in commonplace expressions of sorrow at such sinfulness and waste. He wanted every lady to look after her own kitchen, because the master and mistress were as much to blame for this waste as the servants. A century ago ladies of the highest rank, after prayers, used to put on clean muslin aprons and spend one or two hours in the kitchen, and this intercourse between servants and mistresses was a good thing for both.]

END
Diary, 1874

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1874. In this year she became 61, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 18 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000.

[At the beginning, loose, a press cutting dated September 21, 1874: “Mr and Mrs S C Hall celebrated their Golden Wedding yesterday. It was observed as a day of open house at Avenue Villa, Holland-street, Kensington, for the reception of the many friends who were anxious to pay a congratulatory visit on so interesting an occasion. Mr and Mrs Hall are in the enjoyment of good health and mental vigour….. To each caller was given a card, upon which were printed photographs of the host and hostess and a little poem which we append: [titled - After Fifty Years!]”

Yes! fifty years of troubles – come and gone –
I count since first I gave thee hand and heart!
But none have come from thee, dear Wife – not one!
In griefs that sadden’d me thou had’st no part –
Save when, accepting more than woman’s share
Of pain and toil, despondency and care,
My comforter thou wert, my hope, my trust:
Ever suggesting holy thoughts and deeds:
Guiding my steps on earth, through blinding dust,
Into the Heaven-lit path that Heaven-wards leads

(and more)

It is possible that these were the grandparents of Arthur Hall and great grandparents of his daughter Mildred (Mim) Hall, Arthur’s daughter and co-heiress, who married Nugent Chaplin in 1897.
There is also a press cutting headed ‘Mr Gladstone on Dogma.]

January

Thursday 1

At Margate with Louis and Cleve.

Friday 2

At Margate. Wrote to Alan and Mattie

Saturday 3 to Friday 9

At Margate.

Saturday 10

Returned from Margate

Thursday 15

Wrote to Mattie

Friday 16

Wrote to Allan

Saturday 17

J. E H. S. came on the way to Devon

Sunday 18

Went to St. Stephen's

Thursday 22

Wrote to Mattie. Called on Mrs Nelson. Heavy fog.

Friday 23

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 24

Parliament dissolved.

Sunday 25

Went to St. Stephen’s. Holiday. Effie and boy dined here. Called on Ann and took tea at Mme Celli's. Octavia Saltwell called.

Monday 26

Called on Mrs Nelson. Edith and Ursula came. Dined at Mrs Pyne's. General Election.

Tuesday 27

In the city observed the statue of Prince Consort on Holborn Viaduct, rather absurd to fancy a man holding his hat just off his head for ever – an uneasy position

Wednesday 28

[At this point a press cutting: TOWER HAMLETS:
"Five candidates are now in the field for this constituency, and their addresses, which were approved of at private meetings of their supporters held on Monday night, were circulated among the electors yesterday. Mr Ayrton, whom a certain section of the constituency seems anxious to supplant, seems likely to receive a larger measure of support than his opponents calculated upon, and yesterday a willing band of voluntary agents were canvassing the electors in his behalf. Mr Samuda, the other past member, has also decided to seek re-election; and in his address he says: -- "In again asking your confidence and support, it is to enable me to continue my unswerving allegiance to my distinguished leader, Mr Gladstone, to be able to assist him in the great financial policy he has announced." The Conservatives have only been able to secure one candidate. An eminent Conservative lawyer, who was asked on Monday night to come forward, declined to comply with the request, on the ground that his return was extremely doubtful. The party in the borough, therefore, now centre their hopes upon Mr Charles T Ritchie, who is supported by the Tower Hamlets Conservative Club, and also to a certain extent by the licensed victuallers. In his address, copies of which were privately circulated on Monday night, but afterwards recalled, he says, "While I shall give a steady support to the Conservative party, I shall claim to exercise my independent judgement on all the questions that come before Parliament; and while resisting all schemes for the uprooting of our cherished institutions, I shall ever be found on the side of progress." Mr Curry, the fourth candidate, comes forward as the Liberal and the member of the Church of England, while Captain Maxse, the first candidate announced, rests his claims on the fact that he is a Radical in politics, and has for years consistently advocated the interest of working men. The various candidates will address public meetings in the course of the present week. Mr Ayrton's first meeting will not be held till Saturday night. At a meeting of the Tower Hamlets Nonconformist Liberal Association, held in Zion Chapel on Monday evening, Mr Thomas Scrutton, a member of the School Board, in the chair, it was unanimously resolved to oppose any gentleman as a candidate for the borough who was connected with the brewing or distilling interest, and anyone who is in favour of opening museums on Sundays. This resolution excludes both Mr Curry and Captain Maxse. The Committee of the Tower Hamlets Nonconformist Liberal Association have, after careful consideration, passed the following resolution: -- "Under the circumstances in which we are now placed, and having regard to the interest of the Liberal party, it is deemed advisable to urge upon all the friends of the association the support of the old members, Messrs Ayrton and Samuda." They also believe that it will be a false policy for any Liberal elector to abstain from voting on the ground that the old members are not in sympathy with them on all points, and urge that on the day of election each Liberal should feel the duty incumbent on him to exercise his franchise.”]

Thursday 29

At Hereford Sq all day with Julia, engaged on Acton's election work -- 32,900 circulars sent out to electors.

Friday 30

As above

Saturday 31

Went early to Hereford Sq, work done.

February

Sunday 1

Went to St. Stephen’s. Acton called, and Ann

Monday 2

Shopping for W. and Mattie. Called on Mrs Skinner, saw her and Mr S. Called on Effie, out. London generally very empty.

[At this point a press cutting showing that votes were cast as follows in the election:
Mr R Ritchie, MP 7,228; Mr J. D.'A Samuda, MP 5,900; Mr Currie, 5,022; Rt Hon A. S. Ayrton, 3,202; Captain Maxse, 2,992. Total Liberal votes 17,116 and total Conservative votes 7, 228.]

Tuesday 3

Went with Julia to Tredegar, found all well and happy. Johnny left us for Margate. Letters from Japan dated December 1st. Streets full at the Tower Hamlets.

Wednesday 4

To Oxford Street to buy things for Mattie. John Skinner returned late from the meeting at the Tower Hamlets -- a stormy affair. Holroyd and Ayrton were there. Reading "the Parisians".

Thursday 5

Tower Hamlets Election. Shopping for Mattie. Result of election not declared. Wrote to Japan.

Friday 6

Went to Mrs Pyne's. Went to see Ms L. Shurr. Old Ms Shurr very drowsy. The fog heavy.

Saturday 7

Went to Houndsditch with Japan parcels and on to Ayrton's. Ann, Samuel, W. Greathead and John dined with us. W. Clifford and Charlie came in the evening.

Sunday 8

Went to St. Stephen's. Dined with Holroyd.

Monday 9

Letter from Japan dated October 15th. Sent parcel to Agnes. Called on Mrs Saltwell, Mrs Howard and Evegards. Weather fine and frosty.

[Press cutting: To the electors of the Tower Hamlets: "I tender my cordial thanks to the Electors who spontaneously supported me on Thursday last. I regret that the Borough should have taken so little interest in public affairs, and have neutralised the political importance it has hitherto enjoyed. Acton S. Ayrton, 27 Hereford Sq.]

[Was 27 Hereford Square Acton’s address, or his party office?]

Tuesday 10

Letter from Allan. Went to Lancaster Road, to see Mrs Dickens, out, then to Oxford Street on Elliott (?). Called on Mrs Nelson and took dinner at Mrs Pyne's. Ursula came. J E H S here. Read “Parisians”.

Wednesday 11

Called on Ann. Very cold. Mr Skinner dined here, waited until 11.30 to see J E H S.

Thursday 12

Effie called, walked with her. J E H S left in the evening for Paris. Wrote to Louie.

Friday 13

Holroyd called, brought Nugent. Wrote to Allan. Wrote to Mattie, sent eye glass. Wrote to Farquharson.

Saturday 14

Mrs Pyne and Edith called.

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen’s. Called on Georgina with Ursie.

Monday 16

Took Ursula home. Called to hurry Farquharson

Tuesday 17

Began to make some orange wine. Seville oranges only 8/9 for 300 -- wine will be cheap. Letter from Allan.

Friday 20

Went with Ann to Highgate. Ellen much the same. Julia wrote to Mattie with a note from Louie. Weather cold and misty rather than foggy. Called on Mrs William Knight and on Ann. J E H S returned from Paris.

Sunday 22

Carina's birthday. J E H S went to Margate. Holroyd and Effie dined here. Acton called.

Monday 23

Letter from Mattie

Wednesday 25

Rain. Ayrton came.

Thursday 26

Josephine's boy born. All well. Called on Ann -- ill with bronchitis.

Friday 27

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 28

Irene's birthday. Went to Farquharson’s to finish packing Will’s things -- called on Georgina, saw baby. Fine pretty child. Went to see Irving in ‘Philip’..


March

Monday 2

Called on Mrs H. Holroyd, Mrs Whichcote, the Nortons. C Celli came in the evening. Wrote to Mrs Ellis and Russell of Scotsman. Called on Mme Celli. Looked at house in Cambridge Gardens. Called on Ann. Wrote to Caroline, returned Maud's letter. Mr Skinner dined here and read letter from Maud. Letter from Farqharson to say (?) were going tomorrow to Japan.

Wednesday 4

Went to see Miss Shurr on her 97th birthday -- full of affectionate sympathy for us all -- then to Oxford Street. Called on Effie. Wrote to (?) Jay.

Thursday 5

Wrote to Mattie, Mrs Skinner, Louie. Letter from Allan. Called on Ann. Wrote to Mr Relch declining guardianship of F Ayrton.

[This is of interest. I thought this was a J but now I think an F. So who was F Ayrton? See also 30 June. My first idea was that Emma had returned to Germany for good and that Julia was without a parent, her father having died.]

Friday 6

Called on Saltwell's and Mrs Pyne. Emily took dish to Edith. Stayed to tea at Mrs Pyne's. Miss James in bed with bad leg. Julia at Mme Celli's.

Saturday 7

Received letter from E Ellis. Called to enquire for Josephine's baby also on Ann and M Celli. Acton called, also Effie and Nugent.

Sunday 8

Went to early service. Holroyd Effie and Nugent dined here. Ann called. Read life of Sir J. Landseer.

Monday 9

Snow fell, but warm. Rain also. Letter from Florrie, answered it. Wrote to Mrs Skinner. Called on Ann. Read life of (?)impson. Weather intensely cold.

Tuesday 10

Intensely cold. J E H S came and went to debate.

Wednesday 11

Went with Ann to see Landseer pictures. Received tickets from Acton to see procession of entrance into London of the Duke and Duchess of Edinburgh. Reading Life of Dickens. J E H S came to dinner.

Thursday 12

Ground covered with snow. Letter from Allan. Grand entry of D. and D. of Edinburgh, gave my tickets to Effie and Holroyd. Called on Mme Celli. Letter from Louie.

Friday 13

Called on Mme Celli -- better. Wrote to Allan and sent paper about Coomassie(?) burnt. Walked to Paddington Green. Letter from D. Hicks. Called to see C Ellis's baby -- fine child. Called on Miss Skinner, saw Florrie. Mr Skinner called here.

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen's. Florance came to luncheon. Called at Holroyd's and at M Celli’s. Ann came to tea.

Monday 16

Went to Westbourne Grove. In evening had a note asking me to go to Georgina’s as Josephine had had an overdose of laudanum and was very ill -- she rallied about ten o'clock up to which time she appeared to be sinking. Letter from Allan.

Tuesday 17

Came home from Georgina's. Letter from Mrs Williams. Returned to Georgina's to dine and sleep, found Josephine wonderfully better but still requiring care.

Wednesday 18

Slept last night at Georgina's, returned home. Josephine doing well. Called on Effie. Walked to Harrow Road. Ann called.

Thursday 19

Received letter from Mattie Merrill alluding to his father's death. Went to Bow. Mrs. Henvey confined with a girl.

Friday 20

Wrote to Mattie. Went to Georgina’s. Josephine better.

Saturday 21

Ayrton brought Ursula. Took her to Stanley Gardens. Holroyd came in the evening about Edward’s affairs.

Sunday 22

To St. Stephen's, heard Dean Stanley for orphans. C Celli dined here and with Julia went to Bow, called on M Celli. Acton came in the evening

Monday 23

Letter from Louie saying she was coming to town. Called on Georgina with Ursula. Louie arrived with Cleve. Nugent poorly.

Tuesday 24

Edith came to early dinner and took Ursula home. Mrs Pyne called.

Wednesday 25

Took Cleve to British Museum. Met Acton there. Cleve much interested in Greek antiquities. Louie far from well.

Thursday 26

Worked in morning. Mme Celli to lunch. Louie dined with Holroyd. Walked with Cleve.

Sunday 29

C. Martin and Acton called


April

Wednesday 1

Louie left us for Margate.

Friday 3 (Good Friday)

Wrote to Allan. Went to Bow.

Saturday 4

J E H S, Florance and Miss Skinner lunched here. Went to Effie's. Wet evening.

Sunday 5

Went to Bow, Audrey poorly.

Monday 6

Went with Cleve to C. Martin for the first sitting for his portrait. Letters from Japan.

Tuesday 7

Went to C. Martin's

Thursday 9

Went to C. Martin's. Letter from Allan.

Friday 10

Went to C. Martin's with Ottie. Wet afternoon. Wrote to Mattie.

Saturday 11

Holroyd came to breakfast. Ann called. Walked with the boys to the Serpentine where Holroyd met them and took them on the water. Called on Mrs Whichcote -- Holroyd came to dinner.

Sunday 12

Went St. Michael’s Cornhill intending to go to Bow -- rained too much so I returned. Allan, Miss Skinner and A Wesby called.

Monday 13

Went to Mr Martin’s for Cleve’s portrait – walked there and back through pouring rain.

[Included here is a press cutting: "THE LAST DAYS OF DR. LIVINGSTONE." It consists of a letter from Frederick Holmwood, assistant to the Consul-General, Zanzibar, March 12th 1874, addressed to the president of the Royal Geographical Society.
"My dear Sir Bartle, -- no doubt you will hear from several interested in Dr. Livingstone; but, as I do not feel sure that anyone has thoroughly examined the men who came down with his remains, I briefly summarise what I have been able to clean from a careful cross-examination of Majwara, who was always at his side during his last days; and Susi, as well as the Nassick boys, have generally confirmed what he says. I enclose a small sketch map, merely giving my idea of the locality, and have added that dotted line to show his route during this last journey of his life.....
(At this point a detailed account of his movements towards the place where he died)
Only Majwara was present when he died, and he is unable to say when he ceased to breathe. Susi, hearing that he was dead, told Jacob Wainwright to make a note in the Doctor's diary of the things found by him. Wainwright was not quite certain as to the day of the month, and as Susi told him the Doctor had last written the day before, and he found this entry to be dated 27 April, he wrote 28th April, but on comparing his own diary on arrival at Unyanyembe he found it to be the fourth of May; and this is confirmed by Majwara, who says Livingstone was unable to write for the last four or five days of his life. I fancy the spot where Livingstone died is about 11.25 degrees South and 27 degrees East; but of course the whole of this is subject to correction, and although I have spent many hours in finding it all out, the Doctor's diary may show it to be very imperfect. I fear you will find this is a very unconnected narration, but my apology must be that the Consul-General is not well, and the other assistant absent on duty, and there is much work for me to do.....”

Tuesday 14

Went to C Martin's for last sitting. Cleve wanted to continue these sittings which he found charming, with reading British (?). On leaving I went to Kensington Museum, saw Bayeux tapestry. Note from Allan.

Wednesday 15

Took Cleve and Ottie to the Tower. Met Edith in the London throng in (?)gate Street.

Friday 17

Wrote to Allan. Agnes came in the rain having been to the sale of her father's property. Slept here. Holroyd and J. E H. S. dined at Ayrton's.

Saturday 18

Boys at home in the morning. Afternoon at Crystal Palace with boys and J. E H. S.. Met Mr Grove. J. slept here.

Sunday 19

Went with boys to St. Stephen’s -- J. took them to Scott Bussell’s. Acton called, poorly with rheumatism. Holroyd saw and liked Cleve's portraits.

Monday 20

J. E H. S. took Cleve home -- sad farewell. Ottie went to Greenwich with B. Westby. I went to Bow.

Tuesday 21

Mr Skinner and M A lunched here. I took Ottie to station to return to Brighton. Julia returned from Margate.

Wednesday 22

Letter from Allan. Went to C. Martin's for first sitting. Pleasant conversation.

Thursday 23

Went to C. Martin's -- thence to M. A. Skinners wanted to see Coomapie gold wares - could not succeed.

Friday 24

Went to C Martin's. Wrote to Mattie, to Will.

Sunday 26

Went to St. Stephen's. ? after to Wimbledon with Holroyd saw Mr R.(?)ey and Marion interesting with little girls in their arms -- all genial as usual.

Monday 27

To C. Martin's

Thursday 30

Saltwell's, Mrs Whichcote, Mrs Nelson and Miss Dardis called. Went to C. Martin's.


May

Friday 1

Went with ticket from Acton to private view of Royal Academy. Exquisite pictures by Leighton -- a remarkably good one by a lady said to be only 23 years of age -- her first in the R A. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 2

Went with Holroyd to International interesting collection of old lace.

Sunday 3

Went to St. Stephen's, heard a very fine sermon from Dr Farrar of Marlborough. Acton called here. Holroyd and Nugent dined here.

Monday 4

Weather very cold and fires required. Received letters from Will and Mattie -- all well and happy. Mattie expecting. Went to C. Martin's -- interesting conversation -- then on to Bow -- did not see Edith. Children very well also Ayrton.

Tuesday 5

Went to C. Martin’s -- portrait like but too well looking I think. Letter from Allan. Went to Debenhams for Mattie. Called on Effie.

Wednesday 6

Went to C. Martin's. Occupied in garden, put in geraniums. Wrote to Miss Leighton.

Thursday 7

Shopping for Mattie. Ann called. Received hamper from Agnes. Wrote to ask Miss James and J. Sharpe to dinner.

Friday 8

Wrote to Mattie. Sent papers to Allan.

Saturday 9

Ann, Samuel, Mme Celli dined here. J. Sharpe and Henri C. came in the evening.

Sunday 10

Went to St. Stephen's, heard a good plain sermon from Selwyn, Bishop of (?). Mr Skinner called. Miss S. and Ashley Westby supped here.

Monday 11

Spent all the afternoon at Shoolbred’s shopping for Mattie. Letter from (?) saying he liked Cleve's portrait.

[A press cutting pasted here headed UNIVERSITY OF LONDON: Admission of women to degrees. It reads as follows: "Yesterday the annual Convocation of the University of London was held in the University Theatre, Burlington-gardens; Doctor Storrar in the chair. The first business set down for discussion was the adjourned debate on the motion "that in the opinion of Convocation it is desirable that women should be permitted to take degrees in the University of London." Mr Fitch commenced the discussion. Amongst the objections made to the motion was this, that the University had already recognised the claims of women, and that there was no necessity for going further. During the last six years that women had been omitted, what loss had the University sustained by their admission? The University had made a distinction between men and women; but he never heard any intelligible explanation of that distinction. He thought the whole curriculum of instruction should be open to women as well as to men. He never heard that the examiners made any difference in the questions asked or that they were made easier in the case of females. The number of female applicants for the higher University honours would always be very small. He quoted the late Mr Grote to show what women were capable of doing in literature and science, and that it was unjust to exclude such women from University honours. He pointed out that the opening of examinations by Oxford and Cambridge to girls had stimulated education throughout the country. He hoped that, both on grounds of generosity and of justice, this claim of women would be conceded. Mr Goldsmith, MP, said that it by no means followed that those who opposed this motion were opposed to the education of women. His opinion was, that women were in many respects vastly superior to men, but the qualities required in men were different from those required in women, and therefore their education should be kept distinct. He believed, therefore, that the curriculum of women should be different from that of men. The intellect was more powerful in man, the sentiment in women, and this distinction of nature ought to be carried out in their education. Mr Elliott thought that women who proved that they had the ability should be admitted to the higher degrees. Mr Crick said that, as an examiner, he could say that he found no difference in intellect between boys and girls. Indeed, the result of his experience was that the girls did better than the boys. But he did not think any of them would wish to see their girls write B A and M A after their names. He was not opposed to the education of women, but he thought that refinement, which was their chief characteristic, should be preserved. He moved the following amendment: -- "That, in the opinion of Convocation, it was desirable that women should be permitted to present themselves for examinations in arts, and that the successful candidates should receive not degrees, but certificates of having passed." Mr Lawson seconded the amendment. The Reverend Mr Conway supported the motion. The Reverend Mr Miller called on Convocation to do justice to the better part of mankind by passing the motion. Dr Quain opposed the motion, on the ground that women were unfitted by nature from following the practice of physic or law. They might be better fitted for the profession of the Reverend gentleman who had just spoken. The Reverend Mr McKenna said it would be absurd to separate the certificate from the degree. How would boys like to be treated in that way? Mr Robbards, Dr Simpson, and Mr Osler having addressed the Convocation, Mr Hensman (who moved the original resolution) replied, and said that in passing it the House would not only be doing justice to women but honour to themselves. The amendment was then put, and a division was taken on the original motion, when there appeared -- For the motion, 83; against it, 65. The result was received with cheers. The motion, therefore, in favour of the admission of women to degrees, was carried.]

Tuesday 12th

Went to Shoolbred’s with Ann.

Wednesday 13

Walked to Charles Martin's. Ayrton and Edith dined with us. Holroyd called.

Thursday 14

Went to Shoolbred's for Mattie. Holroyd came in the evening, signed agreement to settle affairs with Edward’s widow. Received letter from Victoire Johnson.

Friday 15

Walked to Marshall and Snellgrove. Johnny came in the evening from Margate. Wrote to Victoire Johnson and to Allan.

Saturday 16

Received letters from Maud and Allan

Friday 22

Wrote to Mattie. Louie and Cleve with Baby came -- splendid child.

Monday 25 to Thursday 28

Louie and children with us

Wednesday 27

Children came in the afternoon. Holroyd's, Ayrton's, Louie’s, Josephine’s and Mrs H. Smith's -- with their parents except J. E H. S. -- also Mrs Skinner, Florrie and Kate -- Constance Pyne and Arthur Grenfell. All very merry playing in garden.

Thursday 28

Went with Cleve to Royal Academy. Louie went to see Miss Shurr with baby. Lucy and Emily went to see Cleve’s portrait and mine. Anne called in the evening, also Holroyd. Letter from Allan.

Friday 29

Wrote to Allan.

Sunday 31

Went to St. Stephen's


June

Monday 1

The 61st anniversary of my birthday. Very happy, children all well and no bad news from the East. Went to Bow.

Tuesday 2

Called at Georgina’s. Cleve, baby Nugent, Irene had tea there.

Wednesday 3

Went to Highgate. Dined at Mrs Pynes -- met Ayrton and Edith there. Ann and Samuel called -- heard of the sudden death from cold of Mr and Mrs Knight's eldest child. Left London (?) steamer John (?) with Louie and children for Etretat at 1 p.m., arrived outside Havre at 9 p.m.

Friday 5

Could not get in until 12 o'clock, tide not high enough - having been duly (?) reached Etrétat at 8 o'clock -- all comfortably prepared for us.

Saturday 6

Nugent's birthday.

Wednesday 10

Received letter from Mattie.

Monday 15

Walked on the West Hill with Cleve. Weather cold

Tuesday 16

Rain all afternoon

Wednesday 17

Wrote to Mattie via England, also Julia. Weather warmer. Letter from Julia telling me of H. Henvey going to India

Saturday 20

Holroyd's second girl born, to be named Matilda.

[Attached is a letter from Holroyd on the back of a telegram from Kate Skinner at Notting Hill delivered at Lincoln’s Inn, June 20 and reading: "E and baby girl doing well -- born a quarter past eight. I am on my way with the children." He writes "My dear mother, I (?) Mrs Miller this morning at 7am and here is the result. It is a curious coincidence that it is Allan's and Mattie’s birthday. I think we must call the young one Matilda after you and after Mattie as the patron saint of the day. Gwendoline has been staying with us: she and Nugent are a very droll little couple. Kate takes them back to Brighton today, so the house will be nice and quiet for Effie. I wish you were at home if only to give us hints about furniture. Love to all at Etretat and thank Johnny for his letter. Your affectionate son, Holroyd Chaplin]

Tuesday 23

Reading Le (?) d’Augebault. Julia went to Walland Carey. Received letters from her and Holroyd.

Wednesday 24

J. -- went to London. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 27

Letters from Julia and Holroyd.

Tuesday 30

J. returned from London, reported Emma had returned to Germany. Letter from Holroyd.


July

Wednesday 1

Received letter from Allan via Walland Carey and from Johnny.

Sunday 12

Service at Miss Wilkes’s only (?) and Mr and Mrs Surties(?).

Wednesday 15

[A press cutting is inserted here concerning Garibaldi:
Garibaldi had addressed the following letter to General Bordone à propos of the fifth centenary of the birth of Petrarch, the celebration of which begins at Avignon to-morrow:
“Caprera, July 1, 1874. – My dear General
De’ vivi inferno (Roma) un gran miracol fia
Se Cristo teco alfine non s’adira.
These magnificent lines of the great poet of Vaucluse prove the anti-clerical character of his immortal genius. Petrach, as much as Dante, is certainly one of the most vigorous of the great pioneers who struck at the very foundation of the monstrous edifice of superstition at a time when inquisitors of all orders roasted human flesh with as much ardour as could be shown by the anthropophagi of the Cannibal Islands. The men who prepared the great French Revolution, and to whom the world is indebted for the immortal Declaration of the Rights of Man, the Voltaires, the Diderots, the d’Alemberts, and all the members of that galaxy of giants would certainly blush to find themselves succeeded by the poor pigmies of to-day who constitute the misfortunes of humanity. But before those glorious forerunners of human emancipation, as well as by the side of them, we may justly place the Songster of Laura, and, under his auspices, as an antitheses of Clericalism, we may cement the fraternity of peoples, and, above all, that of France and Italy, who are destined to march together in the path of civilisation. – Yours faithfully,
G Garibaldi]

Thursday 16

Wrote to Mattie and Julia.

Saturday 18

All went to Fécamp -- good town in a wide valley with pretty little docks. Enjoyed the drive. Weather hot but air fresh.

Sunday 19

Service at Miss Wilkes’s by a Mr Bussell. Fourteen persons, English, French and American.

Monday 20

Letters from Mattie and Julia.

Tuesday 21

Miss Wilkes (?) having tenanted she came to us, dined here. We went to her in the evening and she being afraid to sleep alone in her cottage, John slept there.

Wednesday 22

John went to London. Called on Miss Wilkes. Read in paper of two persons deaths, ages respectively according to ‘acte de naissance’ 107 and 130 years.

Thursday 23

Letters from Holroyd and Allan

Friday 24

Left Etrétat by diligence for Havre, arrived there at 7 o'clock and proceeded by boat to Southampton. Baby and Cleve very well and slept all-night, both delighted to see Lucy, saw them off and came to London with Emily on morning.

Saturday 25

Found Julia well -- enjoyed the comforts of home -- this cheerful neatness has an undue effect upon me.

Sunday 26

Went to St. Stephen's. Mrs Pyne called, Edith's children dined here. Ayrton gone to Liege. Ursula so like her father at the same age in manner and face. Holroyd called. Went to see Effie, pretty well

Monday 27

Went to Schoolbred’s to pay Will’s bill. Letter from Louie.

Wednesday 29

Acton called, said he was going to America.

Thursday 30

Called on Miss Shurr -- spoke of the wealth of the Landseers’ who in their youth lived with the greatest economy, now have (Sir E L’s two sisters) £200,000 between them.

Friday 31

Went to Ann's to get an answer to our invitation. She came to dinner with C Celli. Wrote to Mattie and to Allan.

August

Saturday 1

Acton went to America. Took Nugent to Zoological Gardens. He was well amused, Rode grandly on the elephant looking as solemn and amiable as the animal.

Sunday 2

Mrs Smith called. Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd dined with us and took home Nugent.

Monday 3

Long and pleasant letter from Mattie. Photo from Allan of his child -- pretty. Went with Julia to Royal Academy -- last day. All sorts of people there. Letters from Ayrton (Liège) and Edith (Rugby).

Tuesday 4

Called on Holroyd, saw Mr McGill and Edward.

Wednesday 5

Called on Georgina. Sent pictures to Allan. Wrote to Mrs Ellis about Ayrton. Holroyd went to Brittany with W. McGill

Thursday 6

Called on C Martin about photographing Cleve's portrait -- he out, saw his wife. Called in Hereford Square, all right.

Friday 7

Dined at Mrs Pyne's. Wrote to Mattie via United States.

Saturday 8

M. Celli dined here by invitation. Mr Skinner dropped in at 6 p.m.

Sunday 9

Went to St. Stephen's. Read life of Dante who, like all the greatest men, is adverse to the papal establishment. Called on Ann, saw Edward.

Monday 10

Letter from Louie and Cleve. Wrote to Ayrton at Liege. Went to C Martin’s about photographing Cleve's portrait.

Tuesday 11

Went to Highgate. Ellen not so well but cheerful. Nellie very funny.

Wednesday 12

Went to C Martin’s about frame, he out, twaddled with Mrs Martin. Mr Skinner called and Mrs Whichcote with Miss Caley. Mrs Pyne called. M. Celli dined here.
[Twaddled: From Shorter Oxford English Dictionary - twaddling a. (a) having the character of twaddle; senseless, rubbishy; trifling, insignificant; (b) uttering or prone to talking twaddle – Late 18th Century]

Thursday 13

Weather wet and cold. Julia to dentist for stopping. Read "Innocent" by Mrs Oliphant. Letter from Effie (At Weston).

Friday 14

Wrote to Allan. Called on Miss Saltwell.

Saturday 15

Letter from Holroyd.

Sunday 16

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Ann.

Monday 17

Went to Baker Street to buy things for Maud.

Tuesday 18

Called on Miss Caley. Letter from Edith.

Thursday 20

Edith Ursula and Audrey came from Clifton.

Friday 21

Wrote to Mattie. Bought sewing machine. Edith went to Bow.

Saturday 22

Went with Edith to call on Mrs Pyne, heard that Constance was engaged to Mr Baines.

Sunday 23

Went to St. Stephen's with Edith. Ann came.

Monday 24

Papers from Japan. Edith returned home with Audrey. Leaving Ursie with me.

Tuesday 25

Louie came from Exeter where she had slept en route from Walland Carey -- with brilliant baby and Cleve and Lucy. Ann called. Letter from Allan and photo of his baby. Mrs Pyne called.

Thursday 27

Sent parcel to India. Edith and Ayrton dined here.

Friday 28

Called with Louie and children at Ann's. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 29

Letter from Acton. Letter from Mattie.

Sunday 30

Went to St. Pauls morning service. Then on to Bow with Cleve. Walked in Victoria Park.

Monday 31

Louie and children went to Shirley to see Mrs Williams. Packed for Margate. Wrote to Holroyd and to Acton.


September

Tuesday 1

Came to Margate with Julia and Ursula -- found it much fuller than we had expected to find it – so, were glad to get apartments in the Royal Crescent even at a high price as there were none on coast to suit us. Letter from Allan.

Wednesday 2

Louie and children arrived having much enjoyed their visit to Mrs Williams.

Thursday 3

Weather fine, enjoyed the sea. Went with Louie to look for school for Cleve, saw a rather vulgar wife at Mr Head's school.

Friday 4

Went again to seek for school, had an interview with Mr Boulder, a pleasant looking person and unpretentious. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 5

Went to see Mr Boulder, Dane Hill House. He out, saw Mrs (?)eney, a lady-like person. Cleve beseeched Louie on his knees not to send him to school.

Sunday 6

Went to church at St. Johns Hall, service well done. Wet afternoon.

Monday 7

Louie took Cleve to Dane House. He controlled himself on parting having been diverted by the examination he had gone through. I met him at the school at half past five, when he rushed into my arms saying it was a splendid school, no teasing.

Tuesday 8

Weather bright. Letter from Allan. Wrote to Mrs Nelson and Emily. Went to meet Cleve, missed him.

Wednesday 9

Went to show Cleve's school to Ursula -- being late returned home.

Saturday 12

J E H S came to Margate. Letter from Acton, just starting for San Francisco. Bill of Lading of things from Japan.

Monday 14

[Press cutting here, very long, about the Late M. Guizot, from Paris. About his life and family and very descriptive of his home at Val Richer near Lisieux. MAC may have known him or others of his family, or perhaps it was just that he was evidently a Protestant and an Anglophile, as well as a historian of note, so may have been well known to English Francophiles like her.]

Wednesday 16

Went with children to the Hall-by-the-Sea -- saw the wonderful performing fleas.

Thursday 17

Julia caught cold.

Friday 18

Wrote to Mattie. Julia not well -- bad cold. Letter from Ursula. John and Louie went to Calais by day return ticket.

Saturday 19

Cleve’s birthday. Parkie Willie(?) here -- all very happy. Julia in bed with a cold.

Sunday 20

Went to church at St. Johns Hall.

Friday 25

Wrote to Allan

Sunday 27

Went to Old Church

Monday 28

Went with Julia to Ramsgate to dine with Mrs Perrey -- drove with them to Pegwell Bay, saw the mad erection of (?) the Granville Hotel -- why that high tower?

Tuesday 29

Returned to London with Julia and Ursula.

Wednesday 30

Holroyd called. Took Ursie to Bow, saw Ottie. Audrey very well -- also Edith and Ayrton. Note from Louie.


October

Thursday 1

Letter from Allan. Called on Mrs Nelson. Ordered Allan's photographs.

Saturday 3

Letter from Acton (Salt Lake City)

Sunday 4

At home waiting for Ottie.

Monday 5

Wrote to Acton and to Mattie. Took Ottie to Bow (?) and dined at Mrs Pyne's, saw Mary and A Baines -- Holroyd came in, and walked home with me -- saw Edith there.

Tuesday 6

Letter from Louie telling that Lucy has been overcome by temper. Went to see Miss Shurr - Miss L. S. for the first time looked an old lady -- she is above 80; 84 I think. Received notice of arrival of Japanese goods.

Wednesday 7

Weather wet. Looked at 16 Westbourne Park which I should like to have. Wrote to Louie. Sent Bill of Lading to Scrutton.

Thursday 8

Letter from Louie. Went to International, called on Mrs Whichcote. Holroyd dined with us.

Friday 9

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 10

Went to Scruttons, St. Dunstan's house, (?) thence on to Ayrton's -- all well. Audrey beginning to talk.

Sunday 11

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Ann.

Monday 12th

All morning unpacking cases from Japan. Letters from Allan and Louie.

Tuesday 13

Mme Celli and Holroyd dined here. Holroyd, H. and C Celli came in evening. Walked in the neighbourhood. Weather very mild and damp. No fire.

Wednesday 14

Ann, Samuel and Holroyd dined here -- looked at Japanese "curios". Julia called on Mrs Pyne.

Thursday 15

Very wet

Friday 16

Wrote to Mattie via India.

Saturday 17

Constance Pyne married to A J. Baines. Went to Bow to take care of Audrey and boys. Florrie came and slept here.

Sunday 18

Went to St. Stephen's. Ayrton brought Ottie. I took him back. Holroyd dined here. Miss S. came

[At this point a letter is pasted in dated Monday October 11, presumably from Louie:
"Dearest Mama, I enclose the note from "die Lady Frances" which will interest you and Julia. Please return it as soon as convenient that I may send it to Mr Skinner. I went to Canterbury with Cleve on Saturday. It was a delightful trip -- successful in every way. Our fares there and back by coach 4, 6 altogether. We went outside and enjoyed seeing the country, dined at a snug little eating house close by the cathedral. Cleve enjoyed this. Then we did the cathedral. Cleve's earnest demeanour attracted much attention. Afterwards I took a fly for an hour and did all the other sites. Most interesting of all was St. Martin's Church, the first ever built in England and adapted from a Roman Temple. It contains the font wherein Ethelbert was baptised, and Queen Bertha's tomb. The clerk who showed us over was enthusiastic about it and repeated conversations with Stanley etc. Cleve glowed. We got back by 8 pm. doing most of the return journey inside the coach. Baby had a bad cold on Friday but Mrs Willy’s homoeopathic remedy of tying a lump of camphor round her throat and J’s remedy of grease in her hair and head answered wonderfully and she is quite (page ends here)]

Monday 19

Called on C Martin, went to International.

Tuesday 20

At home all morning. Went to see "School for Scandal." Well got up and Mrs Candour well done. Minuet danced, not too gracefully, at Prince of Wales.

Wednesday 21

Went to Bow. Letters from Mrs Skinner and Florrie.

Thursday 22

Mrs Nelson called. Went to Shoolbred’s for cloth for children's coats. Called at Holroyd's to see house and on Mrs W. Knight -- they at St. Leonard’s.

Friday 23

Sent photos to Allan. Went to Highgate. Ellen’s left-hand quite paralysed and very little use of right.

Saturday 24

Called on Ann and Mrs Pyne who was just going to Clifton as Alice is very ill. Letter from Acton dated from St. Louis.

Monday 26

Went to Bow. Little Audrey had badly inflamed eyes.

Wednesday 28

Went to Stratford atte Bow. The old houses round the church and the church itself have some interest.

Saturday 31

Took Ottie to Holroyd's and came on home.

November

Sunday 1

Acton returned from America. Miss Skinner called.

Monday 2

Returned to Bow with Ottie who was poorly with the (?) disorder of overeating, not that he is at all greedy.

Thursday 5

Returned from Bow. Audrey pretty well.

Friday 6

Louie came to Town. Called with her on Ann and on Effie. Forgot to write to Allan.

Saturday 7

Went with Louie to Bow -- saw there Mrs Pyne and Bernie. Audrey well.

Sunday 8

Louie went to Ashley House. Mrs Pyne, Alice and Bernie, Ann and Samuel, Holroyd and Effie called

Monday 9

This Lord Mayor’s day was like a May day, so bright and mild, as if made for the show.

Tuesday 10

Called on Florrie. Letters from Allan and Mattie. Went to the Lyceum, saw Irving play Hamlet, wonderfully perfectly absorbing himself into the character.

Wednesday 11

Went to Bow. Gardener at work. Wrote to Mattie via US,

Tuesday 12

Julia went to Highgate. Called on Mrs Nelson, saw them all.

Friday 13

Wrote to Allan. Alice Grenfell and Bernie, Effie and Nugent lunched here.

Saturday 14

Holroyd breakfasted here. Called on Georgina, saw Mrs F. Whitcombe and two daughters. Shopping.

Sunday 15

Went to St. Stephen's. Florance, Miss S. and A Westby called. Very wet all day.

Monday 16

Called on Ann

Tuesday 17

Went to Billiter(?) Street to see all sorts of things especially Japanese from the East.

Wednesday 18

Looking after gardener. Acton called.

Thursday 19

Wet. Called on Effie. Sent pictures to Mattie.

Friday 20

Bought dress. Called on Evegards -- Mrs E ill.

Saturday 21

Walked in the neighbourhood. Wrote to Mattie.

Sunday 22

Heavy fog all day. Church at St. Stephen's. Holroyd Effie and Nugent dined here. Miss Skinner came in the evening.

Monday 23

Nugent slept here last night. Walked in the neighbourhood. Dined at Acton's. Frosty. Josephine called.

Tuesday 24

Very cold. Called on Mrs Nelson.

Saturday 28

Letter from Mattie announcing birth of child. Wrote to Mattie.

Sunday 29

C. Celli dined here

Monday 30

Ursula's birthday. Lucy with me. Very wet.


December

Tuesday 1

Called on Mrs Nelson. Went about Will’s book to Evans.

Wednesday 2

Called on Mrs Howard and Mrs Pyne. Dined at Holroyd's, met Kate and A Westby.

Thursday 3

Went to bootmaker for Will. Called on Florrie, did not see her. Julia went to Highgate.

Friday 4

Called on Miss L. Shurr. Wrote to Allan about his boy’s illness.

Monday 7

Went to Bootmakers for Will.

Tuesday 8

Brought India rubber for doors [Edgware Rd]. Called on Miss Caley, thus making a triangular walk of about three miles.

Wednesday 9

Letter from Allan about the severe illness of his little boy. Julia went to Mrs Pyne's, saw Edith and children all well.

Thursday 10

Called on Ann. Mrs Armstrong and Josephine -- baby charming but does not appear strong though not unhealthy and very pretty.

Friday 11

Went to Chapel Street about cupboard for Japanese things. Weather very variable. M Celli dined here. J. Skinner came.

Saturday 12

Went to see Effie, found her in bed with a little cold. Saw Acton there. Went on to Miss Shurr.

Sunday 13

Holroyd called. Went to St. Stephen's. John Skinner left. E Feild called.

Monday 14

Went to Mme Celli’s to see Scatola’s boxes opened -- he spent his money very foolishly. To Oxford Street, bought a lamp for Will and Mattie. Julia dined at M Celli's.

Tuesday 15

Letter from Allan, child better - and from Louie to say Cleve was coming -- went to meet him at 10.30. So pleased to see me. Julia took him to Aunt Ann. Went to (?) about Will’s things.

Wednesday 16

Snow had fallen rather dry, thawed a little. Letter from Mattie - going on well. Shopping with Cleve in grove. Effie came with Nugent to lunch.

Friday 18

Went with Cleve to British Museum.

Saturday 19

Holroyd called to ask me to go there, as baby was very ill -- got a wet nurse -- too ill to give hope of rallying.

Sunday 20

Went to Holroyd after breakfast. Baby very ill, remained there. She died at 2.30 pm., sadly emaciated. [This was my mother’s sister who had Downe’s Syndrome]

Monday 21

Edith came in the evening. Went to see Effie.

Tuesday 22

Ayrton came to dinner with Ottie. Called on Mrs Pyne.

Wednesday 23

Ottie left in the morning. Cleve went with Emily to Circus. I went with Holroyd -- to de(?) the poor little worn out body in Kensal Cemetery at the left side of the path to the left of the Chapel -- a bitterly cold day, snow and ice on the ground

Thursday 24

Julia took Cleve to the station for Margate. I went to Bow. They had a juvenile(?) party -- of pupils and their sisters. Wrote to Allan.

Friday 25

All met at Ayrton's except Effie. Louie and John at Margate. Miss Cole there. Holroyd brought little Nugent.

Saturday 26

Julia and I returned home. Effie came to fetch Nugent.

Sunday 27

Went to St. Stephen's. Called on Ann. Julia to Misses Shurrs’, all well

Monday 28

Telegram from Margate to say that Louie was ill. Decided to go there at once.

Tuesday 29

Found Louie better. Cleve poorly. Baby too much coddled, but healthy.

Wednesday 30

At Margate

[At the end of the diary, on the Addresses pages, the following:
" Knowledge has a very limited power when it informs the head only; but when it informs the heart as well, it has power over life and death, the body and the soul, and dominates the universe.” -- C. Dickens.

In M A Chaplin’s handwriting:
Serpents in Zoological Gardens - - - - - -Dickens
I have been (by mere accident) been seeing the serpents fed today, with the live birds, rabbits, and guinea pigs – a sight so very horrible that I cannot get rid of the impression, and am, at this present, imagining serpents coming up the legs of the table, with their tongues like the devil’s tail (evidently taken from that model in the magic lanterns and other such popular representations) elongated for dinner. I saw one small serpent whose father was asleep, go up to a guinea pig (white and yellow and with a gentle eye – every hair upon him erect with horror); corkscrew himself on the tip of his tail; open a mouth which could not have swallowed the guinea pig’s nose; dilate a throat which would not have made him a stocking; and show him what his father meant to do with him when he came out of that ill-looking Hookah into which he had (?) himself.
The guinea pig backed against the side of the cage – said “I know it, I know it!” – and his eye glared and his coat turned wiry, as he made the remark. Five small sparrows crouching together in a little trench at the back of the cage, peeped over the brim of it, all the time; and when they saw the guinea pig give it up, and the young serpent go away looking at him over about two yards and a quarter of (?), struggled which should get into the innermost angle and be seized last. Every one of them then his his eyes in another’s breast, and then they all shook together like dry leaves – as I dare say they may be doing now, for old Hookah was as dull as laudanum………. Please to imagine two small serpents, one beginning on the ttail of the white mouse, and one on the head, and each pulling him one way, and the mouse very much alive all the time, with the middle of him madly writhing.
(To my mind the most powerfully written thing I remember to have read – MAC)

This is followed by another extract, from the life of Dickens, on President Lincoln’s premonition of his own death, also a poem by Lord Houghton on Dr Livingstone’s death in Africa and a brief report of it.]

END

Diary, 1875

Diary of Matilda Adriana Chaplin for 1875. In this year she became 62, her husband John Clarke Chaplin had died 19 years earlier. Transcribed by Alan Ray-Jones, 2000

[Loose inside the cover, three press cuttings:

A press cutting headed THE JEWISH NEW YEAR by a Jewish correspondent. I have transcribed only the parts of it concerned with the New Year festivals in London at that time:
"Today the Jews celebrate the New-Year Festival, and the occasion is marked with great solemnity in all parts of the world in which Jewish congregations are established. This day the Jewish year 5635, reckoning from the creation of the world, commences. The festival lasts two days; but the Reform Jews keep one only as sacred. The occasion is also termed "The Day of Memorial," and its observance is enjoined in Leviticus xxiii. 23, 24, 25, and in Numbers xxix. 1. It is supposed that the transgressions which Israelites have committed during the past year are considered by the Almighty during the first ten days of the new year, and that on the tenth (the Days of Atonement) punishment or reward, as the case may be, is meted out. Trumpets are blown in the synagogue to call the worshippers to a sense of their spiritual position, and to remind them that the Day of Judgement is at hand. In fact, the New-Year’s Festival is also designated "the Day of Blowing."
On this occasion the services commence in the London Synagogues at six o'clock in the morning, and do not terminate in the larger places of worship till nearly one. The majority of the congregation, however, and especially those of the wealthier houses of worship, do not make their appearance till about 10, when more than half the services have been completed. But most Israelites, women included, deem it binding upon their conscience to hear the sound of the trumpet – a ram’s horn, and it is a curious and not very uncommon sight to see a large number of females congregated outside the synagogue in their dishabille, eagerly awaiting the sounds, before hearing which they will not partake of breakfast.

Then follows a detailed account of the ceremonies, with no special reference to London. Then:
Walking through the Jewish quarters of London today, Israelites may be seen dressed in their best clothes, and while many of them -- and especially the foreign portion -- exhibit a rather ultra-fashionable style in their apparel, they display none of the objectionable vagaries which characterise Christians of the lower classes at Christmas or Easter. The morning after the New Years Day, drunken Jews do not figure in the police-courts, and however much ignorant people may be inclined to sneer at the Oriental peculiarities of their worship, too much praise cannot be bestowed upon them for the manner in which they conduct themselves out of synagogue.
On New Years Day, a very peculiar scene is enacted at the Custom House Quay, to which they repair for the purpose of prayer. As the water washers away all impurities, so the Israelites hope their sins may be taken from them. It is somewhat curious to notice hundreds of Poles praying with their faces turned towards the river; the officials of the Custom House gazing on in utter bewilderment, and the "roughs" who abound in the neighbourhood indulging in certain eccentricities not altogether satisfactory to the Jews.
I may mention, in conclusion, that previous to the Day of Atonement, a Jew, meeting another, says "May you be written down for a good year;" on the Day of Atonement he says, "May you be sealed for a good year," it being supposed that the future of a man is written on the first day of the New Year, and sealed on the tenth. As may be expected, synagogic accommodation is now at a premium, and hundreds of little synagogues are improvised in order to meet the universal demand. Some of the temporary places of worship are situated in dirty thoroughfares, and in unhealthy dwellings; but the piety of the worshippers is sincere, if their surroundings are not very refined. The large room of the Jews' Free School, in Bell-lane, Spitalfields, is thrown open as a synagogue for the benefit of the poor, and here above 3000 persons assemble. In the Great Synagogue, Dukes-place, not a seat is to be had for love or money, so general is the adherence of the Jews to their ancient traditions.]

The next press cutting, from an Indian newspaper, is headed THE TEMPLE OF THE MONEY LENDERS and after this someone has written ‘Nagpur.’ It starts:
"It stands near the city gate, but turns its back to the city. Staring across the muddy waters of the tank towards the railway station, fort and the European bungalows, the Small Cause Court wears the air of one not quite at home in his surroundings and longing to move "up town." It is made the more uncomfortable by the progress towards completion of a new Hindu temple within a peon’s call from its door. There are already three close by; and should this sort of thing go on much longer, the Khafifa Adalat will come to be regarded as an approach to a temple -- if not a temple itself. It might, indeed, even now be fairly denominated the "Temple of Money-Lenders."
Then a description of its operation including:
Its lofty mission is to give practical force to the sacred laws of contract as framed by the Legislature and interpreted by Full Benches, but the mahajan’s muktiar’ who instructors his witnesses in the Temple-porch, regards the Court as an automaton so ingeniously constructed that if you put a stamp in at one end a decree will come out at the other. The mahajan is indeed, the favoured child of British rule.
And more of the same, about the lack of compassion for illiterate debtors in India under British rule]

The third and last press cutting has no heading but one paragraph from it illustrates its message:
"For my part I am ready to forgive the members of an ancient and venerable Church which in the dark Middle Ages of Europe thought to symbolise the creed of Christians, and to awaken the devotion of millions who could neither read nor write by statues to attract worship, and by pictures to represent the Virgin Mary and the disciples of Christ, who followed His preaching and inculcated His doctrine. But at the present time the question is totally altered. The millions who before the Revival of Letters could only be told by signs and emblems have now been replaced by millions who have learnt to read the Bible, who have been told the words of Christ in their own native language, and are no longer bound by the theology of subtle logicians. Indeed, it is absurd to suppose that we are on the brink of a great contest between those who have learnt the principles of the Reformation and those who wished to lead us by crooked paths, and windows that shut out the light, to the temples where truth is lost amid a blaze of light, a great pomp of dresses, and the strains of melodious music. It is very evident that the disciples of the Church of Rome wish to lead us from Confession and Absolution to the doctrine of Transubstantiation; from thence to the worship of images, and from thence to all the abuses which at the end of the fifteenth century and at the beginning of the sixteenth excited the anger and the scorn of Luther, Calvin, Zwinglius, and others.”

Next, on the Memoranda page, a poem:

Dirty days hath September
April June and November
And from February until May
The rain, it raineth every day
All the rest hath thirty-one
Without a single gleam of sun
And if any should have thirty-two
They’d be dull and dirty too.

Various quotations from Macauley, whose work MAC evidently admired.

And some addresses:
Maud, 55 York St,
A Grenfell, 41 Devonshire St,
Mrs Vine, 7 Devonshire Terrace, Ventnor, a desirable situation 2-3 and McQueens.


January

At Margate with Louie, John, Cleve and Carina, all with colds except self. Weather intensely cold -- sea surf frozen. Alfonso proclaimed King of Spain by the Republican Party. Effie poorly. Ayrton's children slept at my house last evening as the fog was so thick.

Saturday 2

Thaw in sight, the frost intensely slippery -- fell down.

Sunday 3

Went to service at St. Johns Hall. Weather very fine -- walked after dinner.

Monday 4

Weather fine, quite spring-like.

Tuesday 5

Walked with Louie. Called on Mrs Willy.

Wednesday 6

Called on Miss Barnes. Wrote to Julia. Read "When George 3rd was King," by unknown author -- pretty. Julia forwarded letters from Mattie.

Thursday 7

Wrote to Allan. Letters from Japan.

Friday 8

Wrote to Mattie.

Saturday 9

The little Willys’ dined here. Emma the nurse went home. I undertook baby, who on hearing of Emma having gone said "Who will attend to me?"

Sunday 10

Did not go to church, received Japanese newspaper.

Tuesday 12

John went to London. Louie took children to see Pantomime at Ramsgate, did not remain till the end.

Wednesday 13

I took Cleve to see rest of Pantomime. Walked on Ramsgate Pier having last walked there about 1830.

Thursday 14

Louie went to London and in the evening to a party at Evegards. Being anxious about Baby I called in Mrs Willy. She is not ill beyond an ulcerated mouth.

Friday 15

Louie returned as a baby was not very well.

Sunday 17

Church at assembly rooms. Walked with Cleve in afternoon.

Monday 18

Wrote to Julia. Reading "Wilfred Cumbermede (?)," cleverly written by George Macdonald.

Tuesday 19

Received letters from Allan and Maud.

Thursday 21

Letter from John dated from Paris -- Florance very ill. Cleve not very well. Baby bonnie. Wrote to Allan.

Friday 22

Mrs Willy came.

Saturday 23

Mrs C. Boulden dined here. Weather stormy. Skies very fine. Reading G. McDonald's clever book "Wilfred Comingham."

Sunday 24

Letter from Holroyd, had a slight rheumatism -- did not go out.

Monday 25

Walked on the jetty with Cleve. He told me a pretty incident of poetical justice of a Greek person to a Turk who was afterwards captured by him -- which he remembered my having taught him to read four years ago, and another which he read about a year after. Wind very high, NW. Letter from John, Marseilles. F [Florance] better.

Tuesday 26

Sent letter to Mattie. Received long letter from Allan. Weather very mild.

The Friday 29

Dined with Mrs Willy. Reading a good novel by George Macdonald, supposed diary of a young married woman, very well done.

Saturday 30

Weather very bright, mild, NW wind -- walked with Cleve to Westgate.

Sunday 31

Went to service at Assembly Rooms, moderate sermon by Valpy(?) curate. Walked with Cleve to Westgate, weather very fine.


February

Wednesday 3

Went to Theatre to see Macbeth -- that is we took Cleve, expecting it would be over early -- however it was as late as in London. Cleve enjoyed it much. A pretty little theatre. Letter from Allan. Newspaper from Japan. Weather cold. Called on Mrs Willy.

[Press cutting: Attempt to garrotte the Lord Chief Baron: The Ipswich Journal gives the following: "a rumour prevailing that the Lord Chief Baron had been attacked by garrotters, whom he had succeeded in beating off, we wrote to his Lordship a few days since to beg of him the facts concerning the matter. We received yesterday a reply from his Lordship's private secretary, conveying to us these facts. It appears that the attack was made as far back as Wednesday, January 6. His Lordship was walking home at half past eleven o'clock on the night, by the Bayswater Road, to 8, Connaught Place. When he was the some distance below the Marble Arch, he suddenly found himself surrounded by four men, one of whom struck him a violent blow on the head, while at the same time he felt himself tripped up and thrown to the pavement. Fortunately his Lordship was not stunned, and with great pluck and activity regained his legs and whirled the a thick stick around him with such force that he broke it -- on the head of one of his assailants, let us hope. Upon this the rascals all made off, and his Lordship was able to walk home. So far this account is sufficiently remarkable, when we remember that the Chief Baron is in his 79th year, and is not a man of very powerful frame. But what follows, though quite in accordance with a quiet determination which we all know to be one of the marked features of his Lordship's character, is even more striking. Our informant adds that his Lordship at first thought that he had only sustained a few bruises, but ultimately it was discovered that a rib had been broken. This injury, though painful, and causing some annoyance, has not at all interfered with the performance of his duties. Neither would he take any rest from his work. His Lordship is now, we are happy to say, rapidly recovering. We hardly know which to admire most in this remarkable instance of courage and insurance -- whether the courage with which a man of nearly four score years beats off for assailants; or the quiet indifference to personal ease and comfort with which his Lordship has day by day appeared in Westminster Hall, and merely regards the broken rib and as a matter of "some annoyance."]

Thursday 4

Wrote to Allan. Weather cold. Cleve too tired (after being up late) to go to school.

Friday 5

Cold

Saturday 6

Cold -- walked with Cleve.

Sunday 7

Did not go to church. Weather very cold.

Monday 8

Called on Mrs Willy and Miss Barnes.

Tuesday 9

Returned from Margate where I left all well. J E H. not returned home.

Wednesday 10

Went to Bow (in three-quarters of an hour by junction with Great Eastern to Old Ford Station for the first time -- great gain). All well. Mrs Pyne there. Letters from Japan and from Allan.

Thursday 11

Sent pictures via Southampton to Mattie. Holroyd called. Dined at Mrs Pyne’s. Called on Mrs Nelson. Paid Lubourn(?) and inspected Hospital in Marylebone Road. Girls public day schools not likely to pay dividend.

Friday 12

Wrote via Brindisi to Mattie. Weather bad. Mme Celli dined here. Wrote to Louie.

Sunday 14

Went to St. Stephen's.

Monday 15

Went to Hild(?)’s Cheapside to buy a new dress. Silks all very expensive but rich in colour, and good.

Tuesday 16

Called on Mrs Pyne, then by rail to call on Ann. Saw Constance, returned home covered with a rash after fever, must be of the nature of ringworm or scurvy.

[Attached, a letter: " When Cleve laughed loud Baby said "What are you doing Brubber? You are laughing like a laughing hyena." I have never said anything of the sort, it was quite her own idea. You know that she always says "'esterday" for "yesterday." Last evening she suddenly exclaimed “’esterday is Esthers day!” “’esterday is Esthers day!” Then laughed with delight at the joke. I heard her saying to herself "I love Grangeggar, I do. Grangeggar will come, Grangeggar will.” February 16th/75]

Wednesday 17

Called on Mrs F. Jones. Went to Marshall and Snellgrove. Walked home -- rather tired. Reading XV Chapter of Gibbon whose writings would not be esteemed so ill now as they were 50 years ago.

Thursday 18

Weather very bad, walked in the neighbourhood. Posted paper to Mattie via Southampton. Letter from Louie announcing John's return from Italy where he saw Garibaldi.

[Another scrap: "Baby looked at me gravely this morning but was soon sociable. She said today at tea " I want to go to London town to see Grangeggar. I will walk to London town if you will hold my hand, Mama. February 28th 75"]

Friday 19

Effie and Nugent lunched here. Always more satisfactory to entertain little children than elders. Nugent enjoyed himself thoroughly and wanted to come again soon. Weather very wintry: did not go out. Julia braved it and went as usual.

Saturday 20

Did not go out. Weather very bad. Snow and sleet.

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's. Holroyd called, also Edward. C. Celli dined here. Called on Mme Celli.

Monday 22

Letter from Allan.

Tuesday 23

Called on Mrs Norton and Mrs Whichcote.

Wednesday 24

Very cold. Snow and sleet.

Thursday 25

Called on Mrs Pyne, then to Bow by rail all the way. All well there, Ottie included

Friday 26

To the dentist’s. Wrote to Allan. John Skinner came from Margate en route for Devon. His father popped in to dinner full of Allan S's projected marriage to Miss Shelford.

[Allan Maclean Skinner (junior) married Ellen Shelford on 23 September 1875]

Saturday 27

Effie brought Nugent. Julia went to Margate. Nugent and (?) here. Miss H. Holroyd called.

Sunday 28

At home all day. Holroyd dined here. Nugent went home.

[Press cutting: DEAN STANLEY ON SIR CHARLES LYLE AND SIR STERNDALE BENNETT. "It is not often that Westminster Abbey is so crowded as it was yesterday afternoon, in spite of the bleakness of the weather, when Dean Stanley preached a funeral sermon in memory of the late Sir Charles Lyle and Sir Sterndale Bennett. The aisles were completely blocked with people who stood throughout the service, and many distinguished members of the scientific, musical and religious world were present….. and much more]


March

Monday 1

Letter from Julia. Called on Ann. While there, Edith came in, walked back with me. Ursie here. Reading "Malcolm," a charming novel by George McDonald. Letter from Julia.

Tuesday 2

Weather very damp -- thawing but cold. Walked out to call on Effie -- too wet, returned. Called on Mme Celli at Vagence.

Wednesday 3

Bottling orange wine. Walked to see Effie. Letter from Louie. Sent Spencer’s Sociology to Allan and book from J E H S for his child.

[Margate, March 3rd/75
"Dearest dear Mama, having Julia here makes me think so much of you and long for the visit to London which is the point of the year to me, though all my days are happy. Cleve is so well. He has taken a fancy to go long walks on half holidays, timing himself to do the distance fast. It is much better for him than hanging about in the Crescent. You know how Cleve and J. and I always say to Baby "don't eat like a piggy," "you're jumping like a gee gee," etc. Yesterday, I told her not to touch some hot water. "If I do touch it," said Baby "I will be burnt, I will be like..." -- then pausing, she looks around for an appropriate simile, exclaiming after an instant with delight "I will be like a kettle if I am burnt with hot water." I thought it funny and witty. Yesterday Julia said "Shall I go back to London town?" To our surprise she said "yes." "Why?" asked Dardy. "To bring Papa back," said Baby. "Which do you love best, Papa or Auntie Dardy?" asked Julia. Baby looked very thoughtful for an instant as if trying to understand the double question, then said sturdily "I love Papa best." She is very fond of Julia.]

[Julia was the wife of James, son of Percy, son of Mary neé Dardis. Why she should be known as Aunty Dardy – if she was – I don’t know.]

Thursday 4

Holroyd came to breakfast. Helen Grenfell and boys came to lunch. Interview with dentist. Took Allan's photo to frame and dress to be cleaned. Letter from Louie. C. Celli called in evening. Sent newspaper to Mattie.

Friday 5

Called on Mrs F. Jones and on Georgina -- children looking very delicate. Weather fine and warmer.

Saturday 6

Very wet. Went to see Effie, dined there.

Sunday 7

At St. Stephen's. Charlie Celli dined here. Wet afternoon. Edward Feild called.

Monday 8

Went to Bow. Children rather relaxed by the warm weather.

Tuesday 9

Received two letters from Mattie, one via Hong Kong, posted the week before the second via San Francisco. Mrs Frederick Jones and daughter lunched here. I talked in spite of my teeth, though not quite naturally.

Wednesday 10

Went to Dudley Gallery, good picture by Leaern of Cheyne Walk, Chelsea -- a familiar spot in my childhood as it was one of our school walks. Ayrton, Holroyd and Effie dined with me.

Thursday 11

Enquired about wine casks in old neighbourhood of Blandford Square, called on Evegards and Blacklock. Sent newspaper to Allan.

Friday 12

Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 13

Wrote Mattie, enclosed letter from Carry. Went to Highgate, called on Ellen Knight, saw Finley there.

[Press cutting: MARRIAGES: on the 13th instant, at St. Johns, Notting Hill, George, only son of the late George Squire, of Clarendon-road, Notting-Hill, to Emma Sophie, widow of Edward Nugent Ayrton, barrister-at-law, eldest daughter of Herman Althof, of Munster.]

Sunday 14

To church at St. Stephen's, dined with Ann and Samuel. Holroyd and Acton supped here. Effie at Clapham

Monday 15

Nugent came -- walked with him -- engaged making marmalade.

Tuesday 16

Took Nugent home, called on Miss Shurr who is in her 99th year, looking well and enquiring after all the children of the family.

Wednesday 17

Holroyd's birthday, dined there met Ann and Samuel. Julia came home.

Thursday 18

Went to St. Johns Wood about education for Lucy

[Part of letter stuck in: “……in a conversational voice “Do you like Grangeggar, Brubber?” Cleve is infinitely amused at there being a question about this.
Yours in haste,
Much love
L Sk….]

Friday 19

Went to Bow. Mrs Nelson called, and Pauline.

Saturday 20

Boat race. Called on Ann. J E H S arrived late in the evening

Sunday 21

Went to St. Stephen's. Acton, Holroyd, Effie and W. Clifford called. Julia went to Ann's.

Monday 22

Dined at Mrs Pyne's. John went to Margate.

Thursday 25

Cleve came -- went to meet him at Victoria. Called on Georgina, children looking delicate. Went to St. Stephen's in the evening to hear Dean Stanley. Cleve much pleased with his sermon.

Friday 26 (Good Friday)

Went to St. Stephen’s. Walked to Kensal Green Cemetery. Wrote to Allan.

Saturday 27

Took Cleve to see St. Pauls. Went into the crypt and Whispering Gallery for the first time

Sunday 28

To St. Stephen's, walked with Cleve to Kensal Green Cemetery -- tired.

Monday 29

Took Cleve to Wimbledon to see Mr Bonomi, saw all the family -- day fine -- many holiday folks all orderly -- not overcrowded. Wrote to Mattie.

Tuesday 30

Called on Ann -- thence by cab to Miss Shurr’s -- old Miss S. in her 99th year much pleased to see Cleve and quite cheerful.

Wednesday 31

Took Cleve to the British Museum. He looked at the Assyrian figures and coins.


April

Thursday 1

Went after breakfast to the Tower. Our guide at that early hour more brisk and intelligent than usual -- thence by tram on to Bow, saw Mrs Pyne -- got home at half past six.

Friday 2

Cleve breakfasted with Holroyd. I went there and took him on to the Soane. Mr Bonomi spent nearly two hours explaining the hieroglyphics and pictures on Belgoni’s sarcophagus to Cleve. Very interesting.

Saturday 3

Weather cold and wet. Dined at Acton's to meet Holroyd and Effie. Cleve returned home by morning train.

Sunday 4

Went to St. Stephen's

Monday 5

Went to Bow -- all well especially the children. Several new boys on this first day of term.

[Attached here a printed poem: THE DEFEAT OF THE AMAZONS (April 6, 1875) No explanation given but ‘Chaplin’ is mentioned in it:

Once more the country’s saved,
The foe is held at bay;
All honour to the brave
Who won the glorious day.

Who swore they would maintain
Each heaven-born institution,
And battled to sustain
The British Constitution.

What valour they displayed --
What pen can e’er extol it --
What weighty jokes were made
By Leatham and by Smollett.

And Chaplin for a season,
Abandoning "Isthmian games,"
Hurled back the bands of Treason,
Backed up by Henry James.

And Hope, that's man of churches,
When fairly under weigh,
With many smiles and lurches
Pitched deep into the fray.

Yes, deadly was the fight
In which they had to strive,
But the champions of the right --
They won by Thirty-Five.

So the women had to yield,
And betake themselves to flight,
Pursued across the field
By Hartington and Bright.

And we're saved from grave disasters,
Contrived by female hordes,
Who on their lords and masters
Had dared to draw their swords.

Who had dared to say to men
(The vain, presumptuous crew),
With threatening voice and pen,
"We're just as good as you."

Yes they dared refuse compliance
To be looked upon as slaves,
Which roused to stern defiance
Leatham Smollett and the braves.

And all the deadly courage
Of their manly bosoms rose
To guard the rights of men
Against their female foes.

The battle now is over,
The victory is gained,
And the triumph with the stronger sex
Has righteously remained;

And women still shall hold the place
Of idiots and of thieves,
Which is their very fitting place,
As Parliament believes.

And we're saved from revolution,
From rapine, sword and flames,
By the strength and resolution
Of Leatham, Hope, and James.]

Wednesday 7

Called on Effie. Weather cold and wet.

Thursday 8

Went to Exeter Hall to the hear Moody preach and Sankey sing. Wondered what there could be in either the singing or the preaching or praying to draw so many to listen -- many like myself probably went from curiosity to see why? Neither had any special power in music or oratory and the substance of all that Moody said I have heard better said by others, especially Ruishon(?).

Friday 9

Wrote to Allan. Went to Highgate and to Mrs Thorne’s at Totteridge -- all well. Letter from Mattie to Julia. Weather very wet.

Saturday 10

Went to H to see Irene who is suffering from inflamed eye.

[The beginning of my grandmother Irene Kate’s eye problems?]

Monday 12th

Went to Holroyd's to keep house during Effie's absence at Walland. Irene with bad eye and eruption on face.

Tuesday 13

Letter from Will.

Thursday 15

Reading "Life of Colonel Hutchinson," gives a vivid idea of the troubled times of the Civil War between Charles and the parliament.

Friday 16

Went to Lincoln’s Inn and walked home with Holroyd.

Saturday 17

Kate Skinner and Lilian came. Called on Mrs Evegard and Mrs Nelson.

Sunday 18

Went to Iron church in Palace Gardens Terrace.

Monday 19

Kate came with Lilian to Palace Gardens Terrace

Tuesday 20

Returned home. Kate and Lilian here. Letters from Allan and Maud who expects another child.

[Mabel Florance Ida Chaplin, who married Charles Nugent Hope-Wallace.]

Wednesday 21

Went to Fancy Bazaar for French protestant church.

Thursday 22

Went to Fancy Bazaar. Kate Skinner went to Walland Carey and left Lilian.

Friday 23

Wrote to Allan and Mattie. Called on Miss Saltwell and Mrs Haward. Went to Fancy Bazaar. J. E H. S came. Effie took Lilian to the Fletchers.

Saturday 24

Expecting Marion Clifford all-day -- she did not come. Ayrton brought Ursula and dined here.

Sunday 25

Ursula, Lilian and Nugent here, took them out, the novelty of running through passages into the Harrow Road delighted them. Acton called, also Effie and H.

Monday 26

Audrey’s birthday, took Lilian to Bow. The children very happy. Lilian slept there. J E H.S here.

Tuesday 27

Took Lilian to Zoological Gardens, observed a fine pheasant from central China.


May

Monday 3

Went to Walland Carey. Slept at Bideford. Letter from Mattie before I left.

Tuesday 4

Proceeded to Walland Carey, at 7 am weather so misty could only see fifty yards in any direction.

Thursday 6

Wrote to Allan and Mattie.

[Here another scrap about Baby: " Baby keeps so well. We met the little Benhams in a field the other day. They gave her buttercups, telling the name. "Where is the butter?" asked Baby after a good look at them. She tries hard to understand all conversation. Mr Benham met me, went out with Baby and talked of books -- histories of France. "What's that gentleman talking about?" asked Baby. "You can't understand, said I. She listened intently a little longer there and said "What books does the gentleman say he likes?" Mrs Skinner will be amused with this. Love to all, your ever affectionate child,
L. Skinner.]

Monday 10

Drove with Carry to the Hobby. Left Walland Carey, slept at Exeter. Weather very fine.

Tuesday 11

Left Exeter about 1/4 to 7 am and arrived at home about 1/2 past two o'clock.

Thursday 13

Mrs Brenner came.

[Another scrap of letter pasted in: ‘The other day when I told Baby of something she said with a smile: “Dear Mamma I must take you upstairs and put you to bed, I really must.”]

Saturday 15

Strained my heel. Letter from Allan asking me to take care of his boy in case he should be obliged to send him to England.

Sunday 16

Allan Skinner returned to England after an absence of 61/2 years at the Straits Sett’nt. In bed all-day.

Monday 17 (Whit Monday)

Got up but remained indoors all-day. Holroyd and Effie and Ayrton dined here.

Tuesday 18

Called on Miss James and Mrs Nelson.

Wednesday 19

Effie and children and Edith and children dined here, played and seemed very happy. Reading "Off the Skelligs" by Jean McGelow, prettily written - but wanting in incident.

Thursday 20

Weather stormy and wet all-day. Dined with Ann and Samuel

Friday 21

Wrote to Allan and to Mattie. Called on Miss Shurrs

Saturday 22

Called on Miss Caley. Weather stormy but pleasant.

Sunday 23

Went to St. Stephen's. Charlie C. dined here. Edward F. called, also Acton. Holroyd to supper

Tuesday 25

Louie and children came

Wednesday 26

Cleve went daily to Mrs Acton's for Algebra lessons.


June

Friday 4

Wrote to Allan. Called on Georgina, Mrs Norton and Miss Shurrs with Cleve.

Saturday 5

Cleve, Louie and Julia went to the Lyceum to see Irving act Hamlet.

Monday 7

Went with Louie to see Salvini play Othello

Tuesday 8

Cleve dined with Acton. Then went to India Museum. Florance, Kate and M A S lunched here. F. sang, Carina delighted and moved. Cleve was also much pleased.

Wednesday 9

Edith and children, Ann, Miss Adshead and Nellie called and the children played prettily together. Cleve going daily to Mrs Acton's.

Thursday 10

Shopping with Cleve. Louie and children left at 1/2 past 12 for St. Katherine's to go by Havre to Etrétat -- leaving a blank in my household which only children can leave.

Friday 11

Called on Mrs Dixon at Mrs Pyne’s -- saw Alice and Bernard. Wrote to Mattie. Weather stormy.

Saturday 12

Madame Schnabel called. Went to Church Street to take toys to be mended.

Sunday 13

Went to St. Stephen's where £411 was collected for hospitals.

Monday 14

Letter from Louie -- they had a very stormy passage to Havre of 36 hours.

[Attached, a letter: "Sunday.
Dearest Mama, The tea has arrived safely so Johnny had better not bring any more. There is quite enough to last me during my stay here. I have quite abolished tea in the afternoon. Emma does not require it when she dines late and I am better without it. Baby’s cough is much better today in spite of the rainy weather, and my cold is better too tho’ I have not got back my voice. The violent sea-sickness and I suppose a little cold too took it right away. By the way Baby was very patient under sea-sickness. She was sick whenever she was awake from Thursday night until late on Friday afternoon. When it first came on she was very frightened for an instant, but directly she had been told about it she took it quite quietly, only saying each time to me "Do you feel sick too?" The chief trouble was that she could not bear to lose sight of me for an instant, though directly she'd arrived here and was told that she was "in France," and at Etrétat she became quite calm and lets me go in and out without a farce. She noticed we kept on saying we were "on the sea" and asked me why we said "in France" and not "on France." She is much less tired with the journey than I expected -- in fact looks extremely well. Cleve is very rosy and clear after his bout of sickness. Will you send by J. two pots of Lieby for making soup? I think that the size we generally use is 1d a pot, but it does not signify so long as it is not too large a pot, in which case it might go bad. Emma cried a good deal last night and this morning says she wanted Emily and it was "all so strange," but she has cheered up now. Ever your loving child. Much love to Dardy”
On the same page a letter from Cleve: “ My dear Manah, We have arrived safely at last. We were all terribly seasick. Last year the boat was 20 hours, this time 36. Love to all. Goodbye from your affectionate Cleve”.]

Tuesday 15

J E H S came. Mr Skinner called and shewed me cutting from paper of Allan having passed his examination for Staff.

Wednesday 16

Mr Skinner dined here and left with J E H S, the latter for Etrétat.

Friday 18

Wrote to Allan. Went to Bow -- all well

Sunday 20

Went to Christ Church. Mrs Pyne and Willy Henvey called.

Monday 21

Received letters from Allan and Maud and Lucy. Child better, called on Effie to tell her - wrote to Miss S and Mrs S. J E H. S. came.

Tuesday 22

Holroyd came to breakfast.

Wednesday 23

Ayrton came to dinner with Ursula to stay.

Sunday 27

Julia with C Celli, took home Ursula. J E H S left for Southampton to meet Maud and child.

Monday 28

Maud arrived with little Wyndham from Madras via Southampton. Maud looked well -- full of suppressed emotion. The child very delicate like a little bird so gentle and light on his feet. Very intelligent and well disposed. Mr and Miss S and Effie came to see Maud.

Tuesday 29

Holroyd came to breakfast.

Wednesday 30

Went with Maud and boy to Dr West, much relieved to hear that he has no alarming disease. Doctor thinks he will do well with care and time, the digestive organs are the most affected.


July

Saturday 3

Ayrton dined with us and Ottie with A. Westby and Miss Skinner

Thursday 8

Went to Ann's with Julia, Maud and child to meet Ellen -- Maud thought her not much altered in the last 3 years -- She admired Wyndham very much

Saturday 10

Called on Ann, found her very poorly with bronchitis.

Sunday 11

Mrs Pyne called on Maud. Holroyd and Effie called and E Feild and C. Celli.

Monday 12

Allan S took Maud to the opera. The black nurse left. Wyndham very good without his mother - having been truthfully treated believed in me when told she would come home to bed. Called on Georgina with Maud and Wyndham.

Tuesday 13

Helped Maud to pack. Edith called to ask me to go to Bow, as she wished to go to Ventnor to assist Alice with her little boy. Rain set in. S Feild called.

Wednesday 14

Maud left at 8 am for Walland Carey. At home all day. Julia went out to bureau in the rain. Weather intensely wet, rain for 36 hours almost constantly pouring. Mrs Rollings called.

[So what bureau did Julia go to? Her regular work?]

Thursday 15

Came to Bow. Edith and children gone to Ventnor. Ayrton busy with exam of boys. Rain continues with scarcely any intermission. Wind North-East. Floods everywhere including Wye and Usk.

Friday 16

Wrote to Mattie, there being a few minutes without rain, posted a letter via America. Received letter from Maud. Reading Maurices lectures on morals. Send card to Julia.

Saturday 17

Wrote to Maud, sent newspaper to J E H. S. Walked with Ayrton, posted letter to Maud at Walland Carey.

Sunday 18

Went to church next to School -- with some of the boys. Ottie went with Ayrton to another church. Fine and hot.

Monday 19

J E H S at W. Pk Rd.

Tuesday 20

Went home, saw Julia

Wednesday 21

Reading in the morning. Walked on the Bow Rd. to Bow Church. Letters from Mattie and Allan. Rain, much rain.

Tuesday 22

Went home, saw Julia and fetched my full canonicals to wear tomorrow in honour of my Lord Bishop. Old Ayah called and I paid her 14 pence for Maud. Wrote to Allan via Brindisi.

Friday 23

The prizes were given at Stepney Grammar School by the Bishop of London. Ottie obtained 4. Holroyd, Effie, Mr and Miss Skinner there. Edith returned. I returned home.

Saturday 24

Went to Ventnor, Miss Joliffe’s, Rosmel House. Found Alice Grenfell well. Bernard much better. Ursie and Audrey well. Pleasant journey. Edith and Ayrton went to Germany.

Sunday 25

Went to Church. Service rather high.

Monday 26

Bathed and enjoyed the beauty and repose here. Went to Luccombe Chine in carriage with Alice and children.


August

Monday 2

John Grenfell and pupils left.

Tuesday 3

Julia came with Emily

Wednesday 4

Wrote to Mattie. Letter from Allan, forwarded one to Maud from him. Bathed.

Thursday 5

Send a letter to Mattie. Walked on E Cliffe with Julia and Ursula. Bernard getting quite well.

Friday 6

I bathed. Received letter from Edith and Ayrton.

Saturday 7

Wrote to Acton and to Mrs Nelson

Sunday 8

Went to Church, wrote to Ayrton. Miss Barker about parcel to Mattie. Same to Holroyd. Letter from Edith.

Monday 9

On the beach and in the town.

Tuesday 10

Bathed. Wrote to Maud. Weather uncertain. Walked on the pier with Ursie.

Wednesday 11
Went to Luccombe Chine in a pony carriage with Julia and Ursie. Weather stormy but picturesque and view good.

Thursday 12

Audrey poorly, found symptoms of Albumenaria.

Friday 13

Received letters from Mrs Nelson and Mrs Skinner. Audrey better. Bathed -- sea rough -- some trouble to coax Ursie in. Walked with Julia on the W Cliff.

Saturday 14

Wrote to Ayrton and Edith. Drove on the Apuldercombe(?) Rd. with Julia, Alice and children. Audrey well, no further symptoms. Walked on East Cliff and through the town home

Sunday 15

Went Church, walked on the rocks and up to the Downs. Letter from Miss Barker.

Monday 16

Wrote to Cleve. Bathed with Julia. Walked in the town.

Tuesday 17

Card from Maud. Letters from Ayrton and Louie. Went with Julia and Ursula in a four-horse charabanc holding 24 persons to Blackgang, very fine cliff - and Carisbrook Castle, an interesting ruin. Pleasant excursion, weather not too hot.

Thursday 19

Wrote and enclosed letter from Ayrton to Allan. Maud at my house with the dear little boy. Wrote to Mrs Skinner.

Friday 20

Alice left with Bernard for Brighton. Wrote to Effie and to Lucy. Went on the pier with Emily and children -- Julia too tired.

Saturday 21

Julia sketched. Enjoyed open windows having suffered much during Alice's residence here from closed ones. Walked with Julia in the evening.

Sunday 22

Went to Church, walked with children. On the Esplanade with Julia until 1/2 p 8 to hear Ld Badstock give a religious exhortation. The people are serious and singing hymns nicely.

Monday 23

Left Ventnor at 1/2 p 9 by train via Ryde with Julia children and Emily. Weather very fine, arrived at home about 3 o'clock -- all very pleasant after the missing of apartments but longed for the bright landscape and sweet air and flowers.

Tuesday 24

Effie called and children. Irene very well. Nugent not looking quite so healthy. Received note from C. Celli.

Wednesday 25

Holroyd and Nugent called, also Ann. C. Celli came in the evening.

Friday 27

Wrote to Mattie, walked with the children

Saturday 28

Ayrton and Edith came, the former looking very healthy. Children delighted to see them. Weather rather wet, but they took the children to Bow.

Sunday 29

Went to St Stephen's Church. C Celli came in the evening.

Tuesday 31

Dr Willis called from Japan, brought parcel from Mattie and two sketches of her dear child.


September

Wednesday 1

Went to see Miss Shurrs.
Voltaire's description of a preacher:- "He divided that which required no division; proved that which needed no proof; put himself in a violent passion with perfect composure, and then concluded -- upon which his hearers awoke and said they had heard an incomparable sermon.”

Thursday 2

Went to Ann's and with her to Bow, found them well. Ann made Ayrton laugh heartily with her comic impersonations. Holroyd called, and C. Celli.

Friday 3

Lent papers to Allan, packed things to send to Miss Barker. Came to Brighton and dined at the Stewards, - A Skinner and his friend Harvey of the party. F. singing in very good voice.

Saturday 4

Wyndham not so well as when I last saw him. Went on the pier in the afternoon with all the family party, saw a man float in the Bay undress and paddling himself about - a pretty thing apparently without effort. Wrote to Julia. At Florrie’s in the evening.

Sunday 5

Went to Church, sermon poor(?) pastoral and congregation thin. In the afternoon called with Maud on Mrs Dixon and on Alice Grenfell. Bernard very well. Wyndham better but very quiet. At St. Leonard’s in the evening.

Monday 6

Nurse going home. I attend to W -- as Maud cannot. Went on Esplanade twice. Wrote to Miss Barker about Mattie's parcel, also to Julia and Edith. Card from Julia.

Tuesday 7

Letters from Mr Skinner, Allan and Julia. Walked in the afternoon with Maud and children who had tea here. W seemed stronger.

Wednesday 8

Out with Maud. Allan Skinner left. Wyndham rather better.

Thursday 9

Out with Maud and Wyndham, have sent newspapers with J E H S's letters to Allan via Brindisi.

Friday 10

Out with Maud and Wyndham

[A lengthy press cutting, headed: THE POLITICAL CRISIS IN SERVIA: From our political correspondent -- Belgrade, August 28. It starts: "Before I make a rapid march to pastures new and quit Belgrade for a region not very remote, let me give a brief sketch of the present political situation. Since my last letter the Skupshtina has met at Kragujevatz and we hear by telephone that Mr Jovanovic has been chosen to be President – or Speaker -- of this hard-named Servian Parliament. He is a member of the Opposition, a "War-Radical" of considerable popularity, and his election is not a good sign for the cause of peace. So, too, the whole organisation of the Assembly, in view of its practical work, is strongly Radical. A new Ministry has become almost a necessity, and it will take office under a moral obligation to do something bold and patriotic. The only difficulty is as to how to set about the task. The Servian people want war, heart and soul, but the governing classes know too much to be very enthusiastic for a life and death struggle with Turkey. And much more.]

[The second is headed: THE BOSNIAN REFUGEES: From our special correspondent -- Agram, September 1. It starts: “ There are, no doubt, a great many refugees from Bosnia now seeking safety on Austrian soil. Hundreds, perhaps thousands of them have crossed the frontier within the last few days; but when you see it stated by some of your foreign contemporaries that as many as 20,000 Bosnians are now in Austria you must hesitate to accept the figure, or anything like it, as historically true. And much more.]

[There is a third cutting, headed: THE INSURRECTION IN BOSNIA
(by submarine telegraph) (from our special correspondent) Ragusa, Sept 8.
The Turks are reported to have lost fifty men in some skirmishes the day before yesterday. Two battalions marched from Trebinje to Bilek, a village to the eastward of the town, which it was thought desirable to occupy for strategic reasons, as threatening the rear of the insurgents. The Turks reached their destination without difficulty, and one ………..
The Consular meeting at Mostar will fail, and all because the insurgents have hopes of help from their nighbours. I have met men from Herzegovina, who say that the very fact of this Consular meeting gives the Christians great encouragement. The Great Powers, they think, must really mean something in their favour. The meeting has somewhat discouraged the Mahometan inhabitants of the province.]

Sunday 12

Did not go to Church.

Monday 13

Surprised by a visit from Mrs Pyne with Bernard. Letter from Julia. Wyndham looking better. Kate S poorly with rheumatism.

Tuesday 14

Went to tea with Mrs Pyne and Alice -- all gone, so proceeded to Mrs Dixon.

Wednesday 15

Wrote to Holroyd.

Thursday 16

Sent Examiner to Allan. Out with Maud.

Friday 17

Florrie called with Mrs and Miss Holland. Went to see May dance. Wrote to Mattie with Maud’s invoices via United States.

Saturday 18

Sent cheque £11.19.5 to Maud & same for Mattie -- also PO order to pay laundress at Ventnor. Louie family come to London and Julia goes to stay with E Taylor.

Sunday 19

Went to Church. Out with Maud. Florance dined here. Mr Skinner, H and Effie dined at W Pk Rd

Monday 20

Wyndham better.

Tuesday 21

Went to station to see Florance. Reading "The Dilemma" -- Indian novel in Blackwood. Florrie, children and Kate left Brighton going to winter at Cannes.

Wednesday 22

Received letter from Mattie. She and babe well, acknowledged receipt of small box sent in May through Whiteleys. Julia returned home.

Thursday 23

Sent newspapers containing J E H S's letters to Allan. Allan Skinner married today to Miss E Shelford. Louie, John and Cleve there and all Allan S's family: grand wedding. W. Steward came to sleep here.

Friday 24

Weather cold and stormy. Sale of furniture at W Steward, Silwood Place.

Saturday 25

Holroyd came with Nugent. I walked out with Maud in chair.

Sunday 26

Went to church in Waterloo St, after driven to Aquarium with Holroyd and Nugent, then to call on Mrs Dixon. Letter from Louie to say Carina has measles.

Monday 27

Holroyd and Nugent with W Steward left after breakfast.

Tuesday 28

Did not go out. Weather cold and raw. Letters from Allan and Louie.

[In this page there is a lengthy press cutting headed: THE ARCTIC EXPEDITION: letter from Commander Markham, HMS Alert, off Cape Dudley Digges, July 25, 1875: “I think a passage from Upernivik to Cape Yak is quite without precedent. Captain Nares adhered to his original determination of giving up Melville Bay and trying the Middle Passage. We left Upernivik at eight o'clock last Thursday evening, and the following morning, on account of a dense fog, attempted to anchor in a small Bay near the island of Kingitok, and within a mile or two of the settlement, a man in a kayak from that place actually piloting us in; but he was evidently ignorant of the pilotage, for we ran on to a rock and remained immovable for five hours, getting off, however, without any difficulty at high water. And much more.]


October

Sunday 3

Very wet, went to Church close by old Jackson (?)divinity by an old parson one of sermons of his youth and long ex-tempore prayers before and after. Maud complaining of pain, preparations made but all (?) off

Monday 4

Today she was up and about and went out in a chair.

Tuesday 5

Maud pretty well again. Wyndham much improving in health. Wrote to Mattie.

[A press cutting headed: EXECUTION OF HENRY WAINWRIGHT which started: "Henry Wainwright was hanged in Newgate yesterday morning, as the clocks were striking eight. The arrangements for the execution were of the most decorous character, and all the more revolting circumstances formerly attendant upon the public hanging of a man were conspicuously absent from the scene. There was no spectacle made of the pinioning, and only for a moment was the full figure of the doomed man exposed to the gaze of the curious. Persons authorised by the Sheriffs to be present at the execution were admitted between half past seven and a quarter to eight, and were conducted through the prison to the chapel-yard. Here a space was railed off, beyond which they were not allowed to pass. In the right-hand corner of the yard stood the gallows, which, as far as might be seen from behind the barricade, was composed simply of a beam running across a shed. The shed was boarded up for a space of about three feet from the floor, and was thence open to the roof, after the fashion of a shop-front with the windows taken out. From the beam depended a short iron chain painted black, and to this was attached a strong hempen rope knotted and looped. One or two policemen walked about within the barricade, whilst in the outer portion of the courtyard the crowd, which by eight o'clock had grown till there were about a hundred present, clustered, leaning against the barricade, silently waiting till the shed opposite should be tenanted.

The bell had been tolling slowly ever since the spectators entered the yard; but just as the whisper went about that it was "a minute to 8," the bell rang out with a deeper and more solemn sound. On the first stroke of the hour a door opposite the shed, and distant a few paces from it, opened, and thence issued the expected prossession. First came the Governor of the jail, then Henry Wainwright with a warder at his side, and Marwood, the executioner, close at hand. Next walked the chaplain in his gown, and bringing up the rear came Mr Sheriffs Knight, Mr Sheriff Breffit, and Messrs Baylis and Crawford, the Under-Sheriffs. Wainwright was neatly dressed in black, his hair and beard carefully brushed trimmed. He was pinioned with broad leather straps, but these bound only his arms, and his legs being free, he walked with a firm step wither t