William Charles Chamberlain , RN

William Charles Chamberlain , RN

b: 21 APR 1818
d: 27 FEB 1878
From 'A Branch of the Holroyd Family' by Thomas Holroyd, 1879:

William Charles Chamberlain entered the Royal Navy June, 1831, as a Volunteer of the 1st Class, with Lord James Townsend, in H.M.S. Dublin. Served as Mid-shipment in "Acteon," Lord Edward Russell, and passing out of "Excellent," Gunnery Ship, and through the R.N. College at Portsmouth, in 1840 he was appointed Mate of "Stromboli."

At the storming of Acre Mr Chamberlain evinced great coolness and judgement in steering the first Boat of the landing party through a dangerous and intricate passage, and for the conspicuous gallantry he displayed whilst leading the storming party, -- being himself the first man to surmount the Walls, he was recommended for, and obtained, his promotion to Lieutenant, 4th November 1840. After serving for short periods in "Impregnable," "Howe," "Caledonia," "Royal William," "Hyacinth," and "Volage," Lieutenant Chamberlain was appointed to the Command of "Dwarf," (tender to the Royal Yacht,) March, 1844 to February 1845, and had several times the honour of taking the Queen and Prince Consort round the Fleet at Spithead. The "Dwarf" was also employed on special Service off the coast of Island (Commander 1845).

After commanding H.M.B. Britomart and H.M.S. Cormorant, on the West Coast of Africa (Capturing Slavers), and in the Pacific, where he was for a time Senior Officer off Rio, ill-health obliged Commander Chamberlain to go on half-pay, when he visited Malta for the sake of the Climate, and acted as Private Secretary to the Governor, Sir W. Reid, G.C.B., R.E., during the first period of the War in the Crimea, but as soon as his health was sufficiently restored he sought for employment and was sent to Command "Conflict" in the Baltic towards the end of War, and was promoted out of her to Post Rank, 21st February 1856.

The failing health of his first Wife, (Eliza, eldest daughter of Captain Basil Hall R.N., the well-known traveller and writer -- see Burk's Baronetage,) prompted him at this time to seek for the Post of Chief Constable of Lincolnshire, and there was every reason to believe that his efforts -- aided by the very flattering testimonials he obtained from Admirals Sir B. Reynolds, Sir Houston Stuart, Sir William Bowles, Sir William Martin, Fanshawe, and other Flag Officers under whom Captain Chamberlain had served -- would have been successful, when the death of his Wife caused him to withdraw from the contest, and to again seek active Service afloat.

In May 1860, he was appointed to "Racoon" for special Service on the Coast of Syria, and was thanked by Lord J. Russell for the tact and fairness with which he negotiated several vexed questions during the disturbances then existing between Turks and Christians.

In July, 1862, Captain Chamberlain Commissioned the "Resistance" (one of the first Iron Clads) at Sheerness, and whilst in Command of her in Mediterranean, in 1865, he received, by Telegram, the flattering offer, from the Duke of Somerset, First Lord of the Admiralty, of the Command of Steam Reserve at Portsmouth, which he accepted.
In 1868, Mr Corry, then First Lord, selected him for the important post of Captain Superintendent of Chatham Dockyard, the arduous duties of which office he discharged to the entire satisfaction of two successive Controllers of the Navy, and four successive First Lords, the Admiralty testifying their confidence and approval in numerous Letters, and by retaining him in office until he obtained Flag Rank in January, 1874.

He was spoken off as the probable future Controller of the Navy -- or as one of the Junior Lords, but he asked for, and obtained, the first next vacant.Dock Yard, and was appointed, by Mr Ward Hunt, (first Lord) to be Admiral Superintendent of Devonport and Keyham Yards.

Admiral Chamberlain hoisted his Flag 12 August 1875, and devoted himself with his characteristic thoroughness to his professional duties, but his health rapidly gave way under the wear and tear of official life. On the 30th January, 1876, he was struck down by Paralysis, and finally resigned his Post in June of the same year.

(Died 27th February, 1878, at Brighton, and is there buried. Her Majesty was pleased to grant his Widow apartments in Hampton Court Palace.)
Biography
From 'A Branch of the Holroyd Family' by Thomas Holroyd, 1879:

William Charles Chamberlain entered the Royal Navy June, 1831, as a Volunteer of the 1st Class, with Lord James Townsend, in H.M.S. Dublin. Served as Mid-shipment in "Acteon," Lord Edward Russell, and passing out of "Excellent," Gunnery Ship, and through the R.N. College at Portsmouth, in 1840 he was appointed Mate of "Stromboli."

At the storming of Acre Mr Chamberlain evinced great coolness and judgement in steering the first Boat of the landing party through a dangerous and intricate passage, and for the conspicuous gallantry he displayed whilst leading the storming party, -- being himself the first man to surmount the Walls, he was recommended for, and obtained, his promotion to Lieutenant, 4th November 1840. After serving for short periods in "Impregnable," "Howe," "Caledonia," "Royal William," "Hyacinth," and "Volage," Lieutenant Chamberlain was appointed to the Command of "Dwarf," (tender to the Royal Yacht,) March, 1844 to February 1845, and had several times the honour of taking the Queen and Prince Consort round the Fleet at Spithead. The "Dwarf" was also employed on special Service off the coast of Island (Commander 1845).

After commanding H.M.B. Britomart and H.M.S. Cormorant, on the West Coast of Africa (Capturing Slavers), and in the Pacific, where he was for a time Senior Officer off Rio, ill-health obliged Commander Chamberlain to go on half-pay, when he visited Malta for the sake of the Climate, and acted as Private Secretary to the Governor, Sir W. Reid, G.C.B., R.E., during the first period of the War in the Crimea, but as soon as his health was sufficiently restored he sought for employment and was sent to Command "Conflict" in the Baltic towards the end of War, and was promoted out of her to Post Rank, 21st February 1856.

The failing health of his first Wife, (Eliza, eldest daughter of Captain Basil Hall R.N., the well-known traveller and writer -- see Burk's Baronetage,) prompted him at this time to seek for the Post of Chief Constable of Lincolnshire, and there was every reason to believe that his efforts -- aided by the very flattering testimonials he obtained from Admirals Sir B. Reynolds, Sir Houston Stuart, Sir William Bowles, Sir William Martin, Fanshawe, and other Flag Officers under whom Captain Chamberlain had served -- would have been successful, when the death of his Wife caused him to withdraw from the contest, and to again seek active Service afloat.

In May 1860, he was appointed to "Racoon" for special Service on the Coast of Syria, and was thanked by Lord J. Russell for the tact and fairness with which he negotiated several vexed questions during the disturbances then existing between Turks and Christians.

In July, 1862, Captain Chamberlain Commissioned the "Resistance" (one of the first Iron Clads) at Sheerness, and whilst in Command of her in Mediterranean, in 1865, he received, by Telegram, the flattering offer, from the Duke of Somerset, First Lord of the Admiralty, of the Command of Steam Reserve at Portsmouth, which he accepted.
In 1868, Mr Corry, then First Lord, selected him for the important post of Captain Superintendent of Chatham Dockyard, the arduous duties of which office he discharged to the entire satisfaction of two successive Controllers of the Navy, and four successive First Lords, the Admiralty testifying their confidence and approval in numerous Letters, and by retaining him in office until he obtained Flag Rank in January, 1874.

He was spoken off as the probable future Controller of the Navy -- or as one of the Junior Lords, but he asked for, and obtained, the first next vacant.Dock Yard, and was appointed, by Mr Ward Hunt, (first Lord) to be Admiral Superintendent of Devonport and Keyham Yards.

Admiral Chamberlain hoisted his Flag 12 August 1875, and devoted himself with his characteristic thoroughness to his professional duties, but his health rapidly gave way under the wear and tear of official life. On the 30th January, 1876, he was struck down by Paralysis, and finally resigned his Post in June of the same year.

(Died 27th February, 1878, at Brighton, and is there buried. Her Majesty was pleased to grant his Widow apartments in Hampton Court Palace.)
Facts
  • 21 APR 1818 - Birth -
  • 27 FEB 1878 - Death -
  • Nobility Title - Admiral
Ancestors
   
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William Charles Chamberlain , RN
21 APR 1818 - 27 FEB 1878
  
 
  
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Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
MWilliam Charles Chamberlain , RN
Birth21 APR 1818
Death27 FEB 1878
Marriage29 OCT 1872to Sarah Morgan Holroyd
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) William Charles Chamberlain , RN
Birth21 APR 1818
Death27 FEB 1878
Marriage29 OCT 1872to Sarah Morgan Holroyd
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (F) Sarah Morgan Holroyd
BirthABT 1824
Death
Marriage29 OCT 1872to William Charles Chamberlain , RN
FatherThomas Holroyd
MotherSarah Morgan
CHILDREN
FHarriett Sarah Chamberlain
Birth
Death
Evidence
[S25250] International Genealogical Index (Ancestral File)
[S1464] Thomas Holroyd "A Branch of The Holroyd Family" - a copy which includes some handwritten annotations.
Descendancy Chart